Investing for Beginners Sitemap - Page 3 2016-09-26

What Does Deleveraging Mean?
Deleveraging is the process of reducing the ratio of debt to equity, or the overall size of the liabilities, on the balance sheet.

SIMPLE IRA Contribution Limits
The annual SIMPLE IRA contribution limit and catch-up contribution limit is set each tax year by Congress and announced by the IRS.

Family Limited Partnerships for Lower Taxes
By pooling investments in a special type of legal structure known as a family limited partnership, investors can pass on more of their wealth to children, grandchildren, friends, and family by taking advantage of the gift tax exclusions. This makes limited partnerships a great estate planning tool as well as a way to teach young family members about the value of saving and investing.

Master Limited Partnership Investing for New Investors
As a new investor, you may not realize it, but there are limited partnerships that are publicly traded and they are called master limited partnerships

Benefits and Drawbacks of LLLPs
A limited liability limited partnership, or LLLP, is a new form of limited partnership that allows the general partner to avoid personal liability.

Reasons to Form a Limited Partnership
There are major advantages to forming a limited partnership. These include flexibility, the ability to pool money and access to economies of scale.

The Beginner's Guide to Forming a Delaware LLC
By incorporating a limited liability company in the State of Delaware, you can enjoy many significant benefits that aren't available to other LLCs.

How Families Can Invest Together with an LLC
Discover the benefits of pooling your family's money together via a limited liability company to invest in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and more!

How Much Money Does It Take To Be Happy?
Money really does buy happiness. When you ask yourself how much money do you need in your portfolio to be happy, it turns out science has an answer!

The Secret Philosophy of Successful Investing
You may get the impression that your highest purpose in life should be to amass as much money as possible. That is foolishness. Here is the real story.

Why Many New Investors Lose Money
New investors often lose money because they are caught between the emotions of greed and fear precisely at the wrong time.

How to Form a Limited Partnership
If you want to know how to form a limited partnership, perhaps to pool money with your family and start a business, the good news is, it's not hard.

Basic EPS and Diluted EPS in the Stock Market
What is EPS and why does the definition matter so much to investors, especially those who invest in stock? Great question! Here's the answer.

Convertible Preferred Stock for Beginners
Convertible preferred stock is a special type of preferred stock that can be converted into shares of common stock. Learn more with real world examples.

Making Money from Real Estate Investing
From an investment standpoint, there are usually three ways to make money in real estate, each with its own advantages and potential pitfalls.

Vienna Philharmonic Gold Coin
A popular way to invest in gold is to buy Vienna Philharmonic gold coins, which are available in a variety of sizes ranging from 1/10th a Troy ounce to 1 Troy ounce.

Is Life Insurance a Good Investment?
Learn whether you should invest in a life insurance policy, and which type - whole life, term life, variable life or universal life - is best for you.

What Is a Mutual Fund Sales Load?
Understand the differences between the two mutual fund sales loads to make better decisions about how to keep more of your money in your own pocket.

What Is a Mutual Fund Prospectus?
A mutual fund prospectus is a legal document filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission that explains certain things about the fund and its costs.

Global Mutual Funds vs. International Mutual Funds
Have you ever come across a global mutual fund or an international mutual fund and wondered if there is any difference?

What Is the Mutual Fund Expense Ratio?
The mutual fund expense ratio is a financial metric that shows you, in part, how much you are paying for your mutual fund investments.

If You Are Investing in Mutual Funds, Avoid These 5 Mistakes
If you are a typical mutual fund investor, you should watch out for five common mistakes that beguile even the best-intentioned person.

What Is a Mutual Fund Share Class?
Mutual fund share classes are a special class of a mutual fund company that have their own unique expense ratio, fee structure, or voting rights.

Saving Money and Spending Money Only Matter Relative To Your Income and Net Worth
When it comes to saving money and spending money, it is relative, rather than absolute, dollars that matter to solvency and net worth accumulation.

What Is Dividend Investing?
Dividend investing is an investing strategy that focuses either on collecting high dividend yield stocks or stocks with fast growing dividends.

Three Strategies to Help Manage Your Inflation Risk
A high inflation rate can wreck havoc on your investment portfolio. There are three strategies you can try for coping with high inflation.

What Are the Effects of Inflation on the Economy?
As a new investor, what are the specific effects of inflation? Why should you be concerned about its spectre haunting the economy?

3 Traits You Need To Be a Great Investor
Do you want to become a great investor? There is a lot in common with becoming a great heart surgeon or a great athlete. Having the right temperament, skills set, and discipline all play into whether or not you will be successful. There is also an element of luck involved.

What Happens to Investments If a Broker Goes Bankrupt?
What happens to investments when a broker goes bankrupt? If your stocks were covered by SIPC insurance, you might be fine.

Making Money from Dividends
This basic guide was put together to help you understand how making money with dividends is possible.

The 5 Most Important 401(k) Terms You Should Know
There are five primary 401(k) plan terms you should know that include your 401(k) matching limit, contribution limit, tax deduction, and more.

401(k) Penalties to Avoid
There are two major 401(k) penalties you should try to avoid since they will can deeply into your retirement nest egg.

Strategies For Creating Monthly Income
If you're looking for safe (or relatively safe) ways to create a regular monthly stream of income, these investment ideas can help.

Open a Roth IRA for Your Kids to Help Them Build Wealth
Opening a Roth IRA for kids can be one of the best ways to help your children invest their money, saving cash tax-free to grow for decades.

- By Category
An index of categories in the

Series I Savings Bond Gallery
These high resolution images of the Series I savings bonds are provided by the United States Treasury department and feature some of the most remarkable Americans throughout the nation's history. Each high resolution I bond graphic shown is what investors receive when they invest in the paper certificate version of the savings bond program.

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Recession Political Cartoons - Evidence That Stocks Were Cheap
Warren Buffett has always told investors to buy when there is blood in the street. To prove that it is clearly evident when this happens, I've put together a collection of recession political cartoons and other economic political cartoons that were published in major media sources that prove Buffett's point that it isn't difficult to spot when the markets are in panic. The question is, how many new investors took advantage of the opportunity?

Ten Part Guide to Beating the Market
How can an average investor beat the market without taking on additional risk? This step by step guide could help.

Know What Risk You Are Trying to Avoid
Imagine the following scenario: You have $100,000 in capital. You decide to invest $20,000 of it in a bank that is trading at only 10x earnings with a 4.5% cash dividend yield in a world of 2.5% inflation and the company looks to have great growth potential with a healthy mix of fee and interest income. The next day, the markets crash and your position loses 20% of its value. How do you feel?

Avoid Wipeout Risk at All Costs
Wipeout risk is one of the biggest dangers in investing. One of the keys to success and consistently beating the market is to avoid wipeout risk even if it means foregoing seemingly huge potential gains.

Pay Yourself First
Pay yourself first is an excellent investing strategy for building wealth and building a financial future for you and your family.

Intro to Stock Trading - All-or-None Orders
All-or-None trades are only executed if your broker can fill the order in a single transaction and price. All-or-none trades are often used as a way to minimize trading commissions and account records.

Asset Allocation for Your Income Investing Portfolio
Which is better for your income investing portfolio - stocks, bonds, real estate? Here we discuss some of the important asset allocation decisions you'll need to consider when putting together a strong income investing system to generate money for you in retirement.

Income Investing Portfolio for Beginners
Real estate can be an important part of an income investing portfolio both in the form of direct property ownership and REITs, or real estate investment trusts. In fact, there are many investors who have made a substantial and good living from their income investing profits by buying a rental property and then expanding.

The Role of Saving in an Income Investing Portfolio
Saving and investing are different and this doesn't change even when you've begun focusing on income investing as your philosophy. The purpose of this section is to discuss the importance of saving even when you have regular cash coming in from your investments.

Intro to Stock Trading - Summary
The final summary of our introduction to stock trading provides a summary of the different stock orders we covered. For more stock trading information and lessons, visit our other resources at Investing for beginners.

Intro to Stock Trading - Limit Orders
Limit orders allow an investor to limit the maximum price he is willing to pay or the minimum price is willing to accept for a stock. Limit orders usually have higher associated commissions than market orders.

Intro to Stock Trading - Short Selling
Selling short can lead to unlimited losses and subject you to margin calls. Discover more reasons selling short is generally not recommended for the average investor in this stock trading tutorial.

Day and GTC Orders and Extended Hours Trading
Day orders and Goot-till-Cancelled orders expire at different times. Extended hours orders are generally not recommended for investors. To learn more, read our tutorial on stock trading.

Intro to Stock Trading - Trailing Stop Orders
Trailing stop orders are a way to lock in profits and limit losses. With a trailing stop order, investors can set a stop price as either a spread in points or a percentage of current market value.

Intro to Stock Trading - Bracketed Orders
Bracketed orders are a combination of trailing stop orders and an upper limit that, when triggered, results in a sale of stock. Bracketed orders are traditionally used by sophisticated investors for very specific reasons.

Do Your Portfolio an Enormous Favor: Take a College Course in Basic Accounting
If you want to improve your investment returns perhaps the best course of action is to enroll in a college course in basic accounting. An introductory college accounting course can help you understand debits and credits as well as ways to analyze financial statements.

Stay Within Your Circle of Competence
circle of competence investing Warren Buffett circle of competence

If You’ve Built a Good Portfolio, Only Look at Market Quotations on a Quarterly Basis
If you've built a conservative portfolio you might want to consider looking at stock prices only quarterly. In other words, if you are dollar cost averaging and have chosen blue chip, conservatively valued companies, do not look at stock prices every day.

Dividend Stocks for an Income Investing Portfolio
In our personal income investing portfolios, we would want dividend stocks that had several characteristics such as a high return on equity, increase cash dividends each year, a relatively low dividend payout ratio, and shareholder friendly management. These keys will help you get an idea of what to consider for your own income investing program.

Intro to Stock Trading - Types of Trades
This basic tutorial on stock trading provides twelve different types of stock trading orders investors can use to help manage their portfolio.

Investments That You Can Live Off Of for Life
Income investing is developing a portfolio of assets that generates the highest possible annual income to use now, at the lowest possible risk.

Social Unrest Gave Birth to Income Investing
The rise of income investing could be credited to social prejudice in the 18th and 19th centuries. This page explains how income investing came out of a time when society was very different than it is today before the focus shifted from generating income to generating capital gains.

The Widow's Portfolio Bursts Onto the Scene
A widow's portfolio is a type of portfolio structured for income investing that generates regular cash for a single woman to use for household expenses, bills, medical needs, or other cash requirements she has. For the most part, the term widow's portfolio has gone by the wayside and isn't largely used on Wall Street anymore.

How Much Cash to Expect From Income Investing Portfolio
Have you ever wondered how much money you can withdraw from an income investing portfolio? The general rule on Wall Street is that you can take 4% of your account value out as a cash withdrawal each year without running out of money. Page 4.

What Types of Investments Should I Hold in an Income Portfolio?
When you put together your income investing portfolio you are going to have three major buckets of potential investments including dividend stocks, bonds, and real estate. These are the major foundations of any income investing portfolio and should be used wisely to put together a plan for your retirement.

Adjust Your Expense Structure Immediately
The single biggest reason people get into trouble when they hit an unexpected financial bump is that they continue to live exactly as they did before without adjusting their cost structure. The same house payment. The same car payment. The same luxuries such as $4 coffees and designer salads at power lunch spots – whatever happens to be your individual indulgence.

Don’t Touch Your 401k! Seriously!
I don’t care if your house has burned down and you have gone through every dime of your savings – don’t ever take the money out of your 401k account early because you are having a short-term cash flow crisis. I’m going to say it: It’s STUPID. My apologies for being frank, but given that your withdrawals are not only going to be taxed at regular rates but have an additional ten percent penalty tax levied on top of them – not to mention that you’ve lost all of the compounding.

Don’t Forget to Use a Rollover IRA
A rollover IRA can be used when you leave your employer or are forced into early retirement. A rollover IRA can be made into an existing IRA or into a new rollover IRA established at a brokerage firm, bank, or other financial institution. Distributions made directly to you are subject to a minimum of 20 percent withholding by the IRS.

Check Your Spouse or Partner’s Benefit Coverage
This one is short and to-the-point but it’s absolutely vital. Sometimes, you may be able to get coverage through your spouse’s employer. In addition to saving precious investment capital by lowering expenses, this can help protect you during the time you are trying to find a new job or career path in the event of a major medical or life tragedy. Ordinarily, your spouse or partner will have to check with the human resource department to find out which options are available.

Should You Take a Buyout?
Early retirement buyouts can be an interesting option for those who are sure they are ready to get out of the corporate game and move on to the next stage of their life. Should you take an early retirement buyout? Does an early retirement buyout make sense for you? Help find answers in this article.

It’s Hard … But Don’t Take it Personally
This is the hardest part. Many people view their work as an extension of their identity. They cannot separate their own intrinsic value and self esteem from that which they do; the painter gauges his success on the reception of his community, the opera star on the overtures shown by the audience during curtain call, the business manager on the profits he turns into his boss, and the factory worker on the quality of the product he produces.

Create Cash Generators Just For Investments
One great investment technique is to make more income through specialized cash generators such as taking on more hours at work or starting a side business. These funds will allow you to invest more money without cutting your current standard of living.

Learn to Manage the Liability Side of Your Balance Sheet
One way to build your net worth and wealth is to focus on the liability side of your balance sheet and your cost of capital. Is it better to pay off your debt or invest? This depends on the interest rate you are paying and your opportunity cost.

It's Important That You Reinvest All Dividends
According to research by Professor Jeremy Siegel you can dramatically improve your investment returns by reinvesting dividends. Over long periods of time, this can help reduce risk and result in ownership of more shares of stock.

Keep Costs Low - and Consider Indexing
Index funds can make a lot of sense for new investors that need to keep costs low because they don't have a lot of capital. To learn why index funds can make good investing sense, check out our most recent article.

Simplify Your Life
This may not seem intuitive, but trust me on this one. For most people, clutter is not only messy, but it has a financial cost. You spend time looking for things, space storing it, lose tax deductions because you don’t have your receipts cataloged or you can’t find the paperwork to mail-in a rebate, require more time for accountants and lawyers to sort out your affairs when something goes wrong. There is an enormous financial cost to being disorganized.

Go After Free Money
Money given in a matching program of your employee 401k plan is free money. This free money can make a huge difference in the quality of your retirement.

Taxes Matter - A Lot
When attempting to become financially independent it is important that you plan your income taxes and capital gains taxes accordingly - in fact, even your inheritance taxes make a difference. That's because the road to financial independence is fraught with dangers and pitfalls that will require the help of a tax professional such as a qualified and honest CPA.

True Wealth Is Control Over Your Time
How do you know when you are truly wealthy? When you have control over your time. Until you can control how you spend your day by having control over your time, you cannot be considered truly wealthy. It's just that simple.

Financial Independence Takes a Complimentary Spouse
Wealth and money are determined in large part by the spouse you choose. No matter how successful you are, unless your spouse is equally disciplined, frugal, and investment-oriented, your efforts toward a better, financially independent life are going to be like struggling in quicksand.

Niche Markets Aren't Glamorous - But They Are Lucrative
To be economically successful and wealthy, you may want to consider specializing in a niche market just like animals do in biology. This is the advice of billionaire investor Charlie Munger who is also the Vice Chairman of Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway.

Support Your Productive Children - Not the Losers
Giving money to children is an area fraught with danger. There is substantial evidence to support the notion that giving funds to sons and daughters that are not economically successful in their own right is a foolish decision.

Income Is Not Wealth
On the road to financial independence it is important to realize that income is not wealth. Just because you earn a high income doesn't mean you will automatically become wealthy or rich enough to afford the things you want. You need to change your definition of wealth to include the portion of your net worth that generates dividends, interest, and capital gains on its own apart from your labor.

Eight Secrets to Achieving Financial Independence
Discover some of the most remarkable secrets to freeing yourself from that special brand of anxiety that money troubles can elicit.

You Must Have Surplus Funds to Invest
You can't invest unless you save enough money to put something to work. That's the great assumption in all finance articles - that you've done what is necessary to save money so you can have something to invest!

How to Amass the First $100,000 of Your Portfolio
The first $100,000 is the hardest and most difficult part of building your wealth. A few secrets can help making the first $100,000 far easier.

Know the Tax Code
An important part of building your wealth is to know the tax code and to work with a competent professional tax advisor, accountant, and attorney. Here, we'll explain how the tax code can make it hard to build your wealth.

Why We Aren't Seeing Inflation Yet
Why aren't we seeing inflation or hyper inflation with the trillions of dollars the United States government is printing? The answer has to do with the M1, M2, and M3 money multiplier. By understanding what is happening with these money multipliers, you can begin to understand why inflation hasn't yet picked up for the average American.

How Can I Buy Series I Bonds for My Portfolio?
If you are ready to buy series I bonds or invest in I savings bonds, there are four easy ways you can put your money to work in these inflation protected savings bonds. Take some time to browse this savings bond article to learn how you can begin earning interest on your savings bonds investments in a few days or less.

Tax Advantages of Series I Savings Bonds
If you use your Series I savings bonds to pay for qualified education expenses, you may owe no tax on the income you generated from investing in those bonds. This great program was designed to help families afford college expenses and is eligible for anyone who purchased Series I savings bonds after 1989. This special will explain the tax advantages of investing in I savings bonds and other considerations you may want to factor into your decision about whether they are right for your portfolio.

Using I Bonds to Protect Against Inflation
The Series I savings bond from the United States Treasury is a great way for new investors to protect themselves from inflation.

The Ultimate Guide to Dividends and Dividend Investing
The dividend guide teaches you how to invest in dividend stock, find high dividend shares, calculate the dividend yield, and more.

The Ultimate Guide to Dividends and Dividend Investing
The dividend guide teaches you how to invest in dividend stock, find high dividend shares, calculate the dividend yield, and more.

The New Investor's Complete Guide to Brokers
This broker guide for new investors explains some of the things you need to look for when selecting a brokerage firm, fees to watch out for, and more.

The Beginner's Guide to Saving Money
Here are some easy saving money tips for new investors who want to take some of the pain out of putting aside cash to build the funds for investing.

The Most Important Financial Ratios for New Investors
Before you can begin investing in individual stocks, you need to learn how to calculate financial ratios. Even if you decide to get your financial ratios from your broker or financial site, you still need to know what they represent. Otherwise, you may make a mistake and buy into a company with too much debt, not enough cash to survive, or low profitability. This guide to financial ratios will explain how to calculate the most important financial ratios, and, more importantly, what they mean.

The Most Important Financial Ratios for New Investors
Before you can begin investing in individual stocks, you need to learn how to calculate financial ratios. Even if you decide to get your financial ratios from your broker or financial site, you still need to know what they represent. Otherwise, you may make a mistake and buy into a company with too much debt, not enough cash to survive, or low profitability. This guide to financial ratios will explain how to calculate the most important financial ratios, and, more importantly, what they mean.

Short-Term Capital Gains Tax Rates Guide
The short-term capital gains tax rate is based upon your personal income tax rate and applies to stocks or other investments that have been held for less than one year. Short-term capital gains taxes can take a huge bite out of your investment returns and is one of the reasons value investors focus on lowering turnover in their portfolios. Of course, short-term capital gains taxes aren't applied to investments held in tax-advantaged accounts such as a Roth IRA or 401(k).

Capital Gains Tax Guide for Investors
This guide to capital gains taxes will help you do a quick back-of-the-envelope calculation of what you may owe the IRS.

Capital Gains Tax Rates on Collectibles
If you invest in collectibles, such as gold, silver, fine art, bottles of wine, or even decorative plates, the collectibles capital gains tax rates will apply in most cases. These are very different than the capital gains taxes owed on stocks or bonds.

Small Business Stock Gains Section 1202
Investors who owns shares of Section 1202 small businesses may be able to exclude 50% of the capital gains profit from their taxes. They also may be able to use Section 1202 stocks to defer capital gains taxes indefinitely by reinvesting in other small business shares that also qualify under the IRS provision.

Understanding Real Estate Capital Gains Taxes
This guide will help you understand some of the rules that determine how much money you owe the IRS in taxes when you sell a home or other property.

Capital Gains Taxes and Your Investments
In this collection of capital gains resources, you'll learn about capital gains treatment and how it can help (or hurt) your investment portfolio.

Long-Term Capital Gains Tax Rates Guide
The long-term capital gains tax rate paid on investments such as bonds, stocks, and mutual funds is lower than most other tax rates because the government wants to encourage long-term investments in our nation's economy. This treatment of long-term capital gains versus regular taxable income makes profits from investments more attractive than profits from actively working. This still benefits society because it encourages people to fund job creating businesses.

New Investor's Guide to Limited Partnerships
Understanding the basic traits of limited partnerships will help broaden your investment options. From buying them to starting your own, use this guide to get started.

Limited Liability Companies (LLCs) - New Investor Guide
As an investor and entrepreneur, it is imperative that you understand the role of an LLC, its advantages and disadvantages, to determine if it is right for you.

Real Estate Investing Guide for New Investors
These concepts are important when you start acquiring properties such as rental houses, as well as the importance of different ownership structures.

New Investor's Guide to Inflation & the Inflation Rate
If investments earn 7% but the rate of inflation is 4%, your gain in

How Do I Invest in Mutual Funds?
Have you ever wondered how to invest in mutual funds or what some of the basics of mutual fund investing are? This was a brief overview put together to help give you an idea of how the process works and what you might want to consider before learning more.

Investing in Stocks for Beginners
Investing in stocks can be one of the most rewarding financial decisions you will ever made provided you behave intelligently.

Top Tips from Stock Trading Pros
There are several stock trading strategies that can be used by those who want to begin trading stock to make profit for their own portfolio. This step-by-step series of articles and resources will explain how to begin trading stocks, ways you can improve your capital gains, and much more.

How to Read Paper Savings Bonds and Other Bond Certificates
If you hold paper savings bonds or other types of bond certificates, this guide will explain how to interpret the information printed on them.

Guide to Investing for Beginners
If you want to start investing but have no idea where to begin, this step-by-step guide can help you understand the basics of building a portfolio.

The Wash Sale Rule: Smart Capital Gain Tax Strategies
The wash sale rule prohibits investors from claiming a capital loss on an investment if they repurchase the same investment within thirty days of the sale.

What is a Market Maker and How do They Make Money
Market makers are banks and brokerages which stand by the entire trading day with a firm ask and bid price on a stock.

When Investing in Stocks, Your Job Is to Buy Profits
Wall Street wants you to feel overwhelmed and scared because then, it can charge you higher fees to walk you through the maze that it created!

What Are Dow Futures and How Do They Work?
Have you ever picked up the newspaper or watched CNBC and wondered what the reporters were talking about when they discussed the Dow Futures?

Example of Dual Class Structures in a Public Company
Companies can offer a dual class structure, treating stockholders differently depending upon which class of stock they own.

Secrets to Making Money During a Stock Market Crash
Investing during a stock market crash can be terrifying but there are a lot of ways to make money while blood is running in the streets.

Grades Do Not Equate to Wealth - Secrets of Success
Grades in school have no correlation to wealth and income according to the research of Thomas Stanley, the author of the Millionaire Next Door and the Millionaire Mind. This is because creative intelligence is not accurately measured in grades.

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verywell. Investing for Beginners.

Choosing a Broker
Opening a brokerage account is a decision that should be well-researched. You won't know whether to chose a discount or traditional broker until evaluating your investing experience, net worth and personality. These resources should help in your pursuit of fiscal happiness.

Money Jokes
This collection of money jokes, stock market humor, and parody sights gives a new definition to funny money.

Penny Stocks
Penny stocks are high risk, highly volatile common stocks with very low share prices. They are often a terrible investment for new investors due to a minimal liquidity, large spreads between bid and ask prices, lower quality managements, and lack of dividends.

Business Valuation
Whether you are trying to learn to value a business so you can buy your own company or calculate the intrinsic value of a stock, there are a lot of things to consider when running the numbers. These essays and articles were written to help you make sense of the valuation process, as well as warn you about a few of the pitfalls into which otherwise rational investors sometimes fall. In the end, the goal is to make business valuation less daunting and more approachable.

Dollar Cost Averaging
Dollar cost averaging is a portfolio technique designed to lower investment risk and avoid investing at the height of a market. When combined with dividend reinvestment, Dr. Jeremy Siegel, one of the foremost academic experts on long-term stock market performance, has called it the

Dividend Stocks
Dividend stocks are stocks that pay high or growing dividends to their owners in the form of cash. One approach to building an investment portfolio is to seek out companies that pay safe dividends, then continually purchasing them throughout a lifetime, living off the money they mail their owners rather than trading.

Miscellaneous
Here are some investing articles that don't fit under a specific category.

Options Trading
New investors should not even consider stock options or options trading. That said, there are a lot of questions that keep coming up from readers about using stock options trading, including call options and put options, for portfolio management or speculative purposes. Articles, essays, and lessons involving stock options are listed here so you can at least begin the process of educating yourself about these potentially dangerous forms of gambling and leverage.

What Is the Price to Earnings Ratio or P/E Ratio
The price to earnings ratio, or P/E ratio for short, is the cost an investor pays for every $1 of earnings. If a stock trades at $25 and earns $2.50 per share in profits, then the price-to-earnings ratio is 10. The P/E ratio is used to gauge how

What Does a CEO Do?
A CEO is the highest ranking employee in a company. The CEO is selected directly by the Board of Directors, who represent the stockholders, and answers to them. He or she is responsible for hiring the people who run the company and goals set by the board. Page 5.

What Is a Dividend?
For those of you who want to know the answer to the question what is a dividend, it's simple. When a company earns a profit, it sometimes returns some of the money to the stockholders in the form of a cash dividend. If the Board of Directors votes to pay a $1 cash dividend per share and you owned 1,000 shares, you would get a check for $1,000 from the company. Page 2.

What Does the Board of Directors Do?
The Board of Directors is a group of people elected by the stockholders (the owners) to represent their interest. The board of directors is responsible for hiring the CEO, setting compensation policies, determining dividends, and evaluating performance.

What Is Dividend Yield?
Dividend yield tells you how much you should collect in cash dividends relative to how much you invest in a stock. Dividend yield lets you compare a stock to a bond or CD. For example, a stock with a 4% dividend yield would pay $4 each year for every $100 invested. Page 3.

What Is the Dividend Tax?
The dividend tax changes over time depending upon laws passed by Congress. Based on the total dividends you receive, you will have to pay dividend taxes on any dividends you earn unless you held your stocks (and received the dividends) in an IRA or 401(k). Page 9.

What Is the Ex-Dividend Date?
The ex-dividend date is the official day that anyone owning shares will be entitled to an upcoming dividend (which is called the dividend distribution date). If you bought your stock the day after the ex-dividend date, you would NOT receive that dividend. Page 4.

What Is the Dividend Declaration Date?
The dividend declaration date is the date at which a company's Board of Directors officially declares a dividend. At this point, the dividend becomes a legal obligation, or liability, of the company and must be paid at some point in the future. Page 5.

What Is a Property Dividend?
A property dividend is a special type of dividend paid to stockholders. Sometimes, a company's Board of Directors will declare a so-called property dividend. A chocolate maker could literally ship cocoa beans to its stockholders instead of selling the beans and mailing a check. Today, it's the exception rather than the rule. Page 6.

What Is a Bear Market?
A bear market is generally considered to be a stock market or other financial market where prices have crashed by 20% or more. The name is thought to come from the fact that bears swipe down with their claws when attacking prey. Page 4.

What Is the Dividend Payout Ratio?
The dividend payout ratio is the percentage of a company's profits that gets sent to shareholders in the form of cash dividends. Typically, investors don't want to see more than 60% of profits returned because there may not be enough left over for growth. Page 7.

What is the NASDAQ?
Have you ever asked yourself what is the NASDAQ? The NASDAQ, or National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations, is a computerized network for trading stocks. It is headquartered in New York City. Many large companies, such as Microsoft, are traded on the NASDAQ. You can normally tell a NASDAQ traded stock by the fact the ticker symbol has four letters. Page 2.

What Is the S&P 500?
The S&P 500 is a stock market index (list) of 500 of the largest publicly traded stocks in the United States. It is market capitalization weighted, meaning a company worth $100 billion has 100x that impact of a $1 billion company. Page 3.

What Is the PEG Ratio?
The PEG ratio is a more advanced version of the price-to-earnings ratio (or p/e ratio) because it factors in a company's growth. It tries to adjust for rapidly expanding companies so they don't appear more expensive than they really are. Page 4.

Why Don't All Stocks Pay Dividends?
Have you ever wondered why not all stocks pay dividends? Sometimes, a company has a high growth business and it can reinvest its profits at attractive rates of return (typically above 15%). When this happy situation occurs, it doesn't make sense to send money to shareholders. Instead, it should be reinvested. Page 8.

What Is Enterprise Value?
Enterprise value is a stock's market capitalization plus all of its outstanding debt. It is the price you would pay for every single share of stock PLUS the cost paying off all of a company's debt so that it owed not one penny to anyone else. Page 2.

What Does the CFO Do?
The CFO, or Chief Financial Officer, is responsible for overseeing the financial operations of a company including the Treasurer, who handles liquidity needs (e.g., is there enough cash to pay the bills), and the accountants, who prepare the 10K. Page 6.

Revenue and Sales on the Income Statement
Total revenue or total sales on the income statement represents the money generated by a business during the measurement period.

What is SIPC Insurance?
SIPC insurance covers investors that find themselves the victim of a bankrupt brokerage account. SIPC insurance normally covers up to $500,000 in assets. It does not cover market losses. Page 5.

What Does It Mean When a Stock Has Two Classes of Shares?
Some companies have multiple classes of stocks. Each class can have its own dividend rights, voting rights, share price, and other unique features. Multiple classes of stock are useful for families that want to keep control but still go public. Page 11.

What Is a Sector or Industry?
A sector is a broad category used to classify companies - oil, software, or hotels, for example. A sector is a more focused classification - video games, for instance, is a sector that fits under the software industry. Page 3.

What Is The Asset Placement Tax Technique
Investing for Beginners. Page 15.

What Is an Annual Report?
An annual report is a document prepared by a company for its stockholders, the owners. It is often less detailed than the 10K and designed to be more easily understood. Some companies don't issue an annual report, just mail the 10K to shareholders. Page 9.

What Is a Hedge Fund?
A hedge fund is a partnership where investors kick in money and a professional money manager agrees to invest the cash in exchange for a cut of the profits. Hedge funds can specialize in almost anything from real estate to stocks. It's that simple. Page 13.

How Is a Mutual Fund Different Than a Stock?
A mutual fund is different than stock. Stock represents ownership in a business. A mutual fund is effectively a trust fund that invests in stocks, bonds, etc. When you buy a mutual fund, your money is pooled with others and a professional money manager uses it to buy assets including stocks. Page 9.

Can You Buy Stock Without a Broker?
Some investors prefer to hold shares of stock directly and not through a brokerage account. That way, they get their dividend checks directly, they don't have to worry about their broker going bankrupt, and they paid very low, or no, commissions. So no, you don't have to have a stock broker to invest in stock. Page 6.

What Is a Stock Split?
What is a stock split? To make a stock cheaper and more affordable, a Board of Directors may vote to print more certificates and distribute them pro-rata to existing owners (stockholders). This makes each individual share worth less, lowering the price and is called a stock split. A 2-1 split of the common stock is common. Page 10.

What Does It Mean If Stocks Are Held in a Street Name?
When a stock is held in a street name, it means that it is held through a brokerage account. The company isn't aware that you own it because the name of the stock broker will show up on its shareholder roster. Most people hold stocks in a street name. Page 7.

What Is the Definition of a Ticker Symbol?
A ticker symbol is a short, abbreviated collection of letters that the financial markets use to identify a security such as a stock. For instance, the ticker symbol of General Electric is GE. The ticker symbol of Apple is APPL. The ticker symbol of Coca-Cola is KO. Page 8.

What Is a Margin Call?
A margin call happens when an investor's account value has fallen below the net worth required for a broker to continue loaning money. If the investor doesn't immediately deposit funds, the broker will sell stocks or bonds and pay back the loan. Page 2.

What Is Value Investing?
Value investing is a philosophy of finding stocks or other investments that are undervalued (e.g., buying $1 of asset for $0.50). Many people consider value investing dull and as boring as drying paint. Warren Buffett is the most famous value investor and Benjamin Graham is considered to be the father of value investing. Page 18.

stock-trading
Everyone talks about stocks but few people understand them. This investing for beginners guide was put together so you could learn the 101 most frequently asked questions about stocks and the stock market in only a few minutes, putting you years ahead of the average American in understand what stocks are, how they work, and what some common terms mean.

What Is an Inflation Hedge Stock?
An inflation hedge stock is stock in a business that has the power to raise prices along with inflation so that the investor isn't hurt; a company like Coca-Cola is likely going to be able to maintain the price of Coke with inflation, protecting profits. Page 32.

Should I Pay Off My Debt or Buy Stock?
Whether you pay off your debt or invest depends upon the cost of your debt (the interest rate), the percentage of your income that the fixed debt payment takes, the returns you can earn on your investments, opportunity cost, and much more. Page 34.

How Can I Save More Money to Invest?
There are a lot of ways to save more money. That's why I put together the saving money guide (see link below) that will point out some great tips that may help you put aside more cash so you have a better chance to begin the process of investing. Page 13.

Why Are Investors So Obsessed With the Time Value of Money?
Investors are obsessed with the time value of money because the longer money has to grow (

What Is Margin Debt?
Trading stocks on margin can be dangerous. When someone buys stock on margin, it just means that they are borrowing money from their stock broker to buy more shares than the cash in their account would allow. Your broker can demand repayment immediately and the interest rate is variable.

What Is an Asset Management Account?
Asset management accounts are like super-brokerage and bank accounts. From a single account, you can earn interest on deposits, buy or sell stocks, bonds, or options, write checks, use a debit card, create short-term loans backed by assets, and more. Page 4.

saving-money
Everyone talks about stocks but few people understand them. This investing for beginners guide was put together so you could learn the 101 most frequently asked questions about stocks and the stock market in only a few minutes, putting you years ahead of the average American in understand what stocks are, how they work, and what some common terms mean.

What Is an Asset Class?
Asset classes are a way to classify different types of investments. For instance, stocks are an asset class. Bonds are an asset class. Real estate is an asset class. Private business is an asset class. Page 4.

What Is the Difference Between Saving and Investing?
The difference between saving and investing is an important one. Saving represents money that is supposed to be immediately liquid and safe. Investing is for money that is supposed to be generating more money. Knowing the difference can help lower risk. Page 3.

What Does Pay Yourself First Mean?
Pay yourself first is a method where money is automatically taken out of a bank account or paycheck for investments so that the investor never sees it. It works because studies have shown that people adjust their spending to the total cash they have.

How Can Someone Live Off Their Investments?
The goal of most investors is to get to the point that they can live off their money. This is called income investing. The art of income investing involves learning how to tell how

Where Should I Invest My Down Payment Money?
Down payment money should only be put in the safest, most secure investments available, preferably backed by a sovereign government with good credit. FDIC insured bank accounts, certificates of deposit, and Treasury bills are a few down payment options. Page 5.

Which Is Better - Real Estate or Stocks?
Do you think stocks or real estate is a better investment? Real estate and stocks are two of the most popular asset classes available to investors. Which is better? Both have unique benefits and drawbacks. It depends, in part, upon your background, skills, net worth, personality, and tax laws. Page 29.

Who Is Warren Buffett?
Warren Buffett is considered to be the greatest long-term investor in history. From a tiny partnership in his bedroom at 25 years old to his company, Berkshire Hathaway, someone who invested $10,000 with him now has more than $50,000,000. Page 22.

What Is a Tracking Stock?
A tracking stock is a special type of stock that is supposed to

What Is a Market Order?
A market order is the simplest type of stock trade you can place with your broker. It means that if you want to buy or sell 100 shares of a stock, for instance, it will get transmitted to the exchange and the order will be filled at the current price. Page 6.

What Is Risk Arbitrage?
Risk arbitrage is a special type of operation that involves buying stock in one market and selling it in another, pocketing tiny profits from the difference between the two. These tiny gains can lead to big annual profits if managed correctly. Page 5.

What Is the Par Value of a Stock?
The par value of a stock used to be important to investors. Par value was the face value printed on a stock certificate or bond certificate. It had an important role in bankruptcy but it is virtually meaningless today so you can ignore it for all intents and purposes. Page 19.

what-is-stock
Everyone talks about stocks but few people understand them. This investing for beginners guide was put together so you could learn the 101 most frequently asked questions about stocks and the stock market in only a few minutes, putting you years ahead of the average American in understand what stocks are, how they work, and what some common terms mean.

What Is the Spread?
The spread of a stock represents the difference between the ask and the buy price. The stock spread is the profit for the market maker at the stock exchange that took on the risk of filling an order with his or her own company's money. The smaller the stock spread, the better for you. Page 26.

What Is the Ask Price?
The ask price is the lowest price at which a seller is willing to sell his or her stock or bond. It must always be compared to the bid price to calculate the spread (which is the profit someone called a market maker earns - we'll learn that in a moment). Page 25.

What Exactly Is Stock?
Have you ever asked yourself, what is stock? A share of stock is nothing more than a piece of a business. If a company has 100 shares outstanding, 1 share would equal 1% (1 divided by 100 = 1%). If a company had 50 shares outstanding, 1 share would equal 2% (1 divided by 50 = 2%).

What Are Market Makers
Market makers use their own company's money to stand in at a stock exchange and facilitate trades between buyers and sellers. They sometimes use their own money to keep a stock liquid. Without them, you would have to wait around to find a matched order! Page 27.

What Are Blue Chip Stocks?
What are blue chip stocks? Blue chip stocks are stocks that investors think are high quality and valuable due to strong dividends and balance sheets. Page 3.

What Are ADRs or American Depository Receipts?
ADRs, or American Depository Receipts, represent an interest in shares of a foreign stock held in trust by a bank. Instead of having to buy shares through a foreign stock exchange, you can buy the trust certificates, or ADRs, locally. Page 15.

What Is the Difference Between a Stock and a Bond
What is the difference between a stock and a bond? This question is often asked by new investors. Here's a simple answer to the question of what a stock is versus what a bond is. Page 2.

Pink Sheets Stock Trading?
The pink sheets refer to a market for stocks that are very, very rarely traded. Fluctuations in price can be extreme and sometimes, it can be impossible to buy or sell shares. New investors should not invest in the pink sheets under any condition. Page 22.

How Does Shorting Stock Work?
Selling short or short selling is a way to make money from a crashing stock or a stock falling in price. If you think a company's stock is going to fall, you can borrow shares from other investors and sell them. You pocket the money. At some point in the future, if the stock falls, you can buy back the stock at the lower price and repay the shares your borrowed. Short selling is not without its risks and can lead to unlimited losses. Page 16.

How Can I Find Stocks for My Portfolio?
Finding investment ideas for your portfolio can be fun. A popular method is browsing through the thousands of Value Line pages, Morningstar records, or Standard and Poor's reports. Another way is call your favorite companies and ask if they are public. Page 30.

Bid Price Definition - What Is the Bid Price?
The bid price of a stock is very important. The bid price is the highest price at which a buyer is willing to buy a stock or bond. It must always be compared to the ask price to calculate the spread (which is the profit someone called a market maker earns - we'll learn that in a moment). Page 24.

What is a Call Option?
A call option is a type of stock option that gives the buyer the right - but not the obligation - to buy a set amount of shares in a company at a predetermined price. The higher the stock price above the call option price, the more money the owner makes. Page 15.

What Is the Dreaded Wash Sale Rule?
The wash sale rule is a special tax trap that could cause you to get in trouble with the IRS. If you sell a stock at a loss and then repurchase the shares before a 30+ day window, you cannot write the loss off your taxes! Page 14.

What Is the 10 Percent Factor?
The interesting thing about finance is that almost all assets classes (other than bonds) tend to return 10 percent on a non-leverage basis, whether it's stocks, real estate, or even rare pianos. Humans tend to consider this a

What Is an All Or None Order?
An all or none stock trades allow you to tell your broker that you only want an order filled if they can buy, or sell, all of the shares you instructed them to trade. This is important for strategies such as selling covered calls. Page 8.

What Is a Put Option?
A put option gives the buyer the right, but not the obligation, to sell his or her shares of a stock at a predetermined price. It is like an insurance policy. If the stock crashes, the put option owner can exercise his put option and avoid major losses. Page 16.

Are Stocks Just Another Form of Gambling?
Is the stock market just another way of gambling? For fools and the misguided, stocks are unique in that they can be used as a form of gambling, making Wall Street a casino. For disciplined people following a Ben Graham philosophy, stocks are merely pieces of a business and can be bought rationally. Page 23.

What Should I Teach My Kids About Investing?
There are six life lessons you should instill in your kids and teenagers before they leave home. The attached article (see link below) explains what they are and why they are important. These simple money tips could help change their life for the better. Page 9.

Is Investing for Gay Couples Different?
A gay man or gay couple investing faces unique questions when investing such as whether or not to own shares of companies that discriminate, or how to structure holdings in states where marriage equality is not yet a reality. Here are some resources that may help gay couples and gay men invest better. Page 7.

What Is Growth Investing?
Growth investing is a strategy that involves buying shares with high growth rates and rapidly expanding operations. Growth investors typically buy stocks with high price-to-earnings ratios under the belief that growth will make up for it. Page 19.

What Are the Fees I Should Avoid When Investing?
The number one rip-off fee, in my opinion, is something called a

What Is Day Trading?
Day trading is a style of speculation that involves the trader buying and selling stocks or other assets rapidly, hoping to make a few percentage points gain on dozens, or even thousands, of transactions. Page 20.

What Is the Difference Between a Day Order and a GTC Order?
When you are ready to trade stock, you can place either a day order, which will expire at the end of the trading day if it isn't filled, or a good-till-canceled order, which won't expire for up to sixty days, depending upon the broker. Page 10.

The City Lie
Some investors believe the lie they need to live in a big city to become rich. However, studies have shown that it is nearly impossible to become wealthy in places like New York relative to small towns due to the cost of living. Page 12.

How Much Can I Contribute to My 401k, Roth IRA, or Other Retirement Account?
401k contribution, IRA contribution limits, and other retirement account contribution limits all vary based upon the account type, tax law, and your household adjusted gross income. This special guide (see link below) to contribution limits should help. Page 10.

How Do Investors Make Money from Stocks?
There are two ways to make money from owning stocks: 1. dividends and spin-offs, and 2. an increase in the share price. Different investors pursue different strategies, some favoring one type over the other for tax reasons or personality. Page 31.

What Is an Investment Bank?
An investment bank is a special type of financial institution that helps companies go public and issue stock or bonds, raising money for expansion, refinancing, or other causes. They are one of the engines of society and make modern life possible. Page 13.

Why Do Stock Prices Fluctuate?
Stock prices fluctuate because the stock market is basically an auction, like eBay, where buyers and sellers are constantly putting in the prices they are willing to pay (or receive) for their shares. This causes stock prices to move almost by the second. Page 20.

What Are Penny Stocks?
A penny stock is a highly risky, low-priced stock (usually a few cents or even a dollar or two) that isn't traded heavily so it can be manipulated. It is often the subject of scams to steal money from naive new investors and so should be avoided. Page 21.

What are Basket Stocks or Basket Securities?
If you want to buy dozens, hundreds, or even thousands of stocks, you can do it by buying shares of a single

what-is-stock
Everyone talks about stocks but few people understand them. This investing for beginners guide was put together so you could learn the 101 most frequently asked questions about stocks and the stock market in only a few minutes, putting you years ahead of the average American in understand what stocks are, how they work, and what some common terms mean.

What Is a Limit Order?
A limit order lets you set a minimum or maximum price before your stock trade gets converted to a market order and sent to the stock exchange. Until you become very experienced, almost all orders should be limit orders to protect yourself. Page 7.

What Is a Golden Parachute?
A golden parachute is a severance package given to high ranking executives that is so generous, they effectively would never have to work again because they could live off the dividends and interest of the money.

What Is a Bracketed Order?
Bracketed orders may allow new investors to combine the best of both worlds. You can protect your profits, limit your losses, and structure your brokerage orders according to your own outlook for a stock or exchange traded funds. Page 12.

What Is a Non-Assessable Stock?
In the old days, stocks were assessable, meaning if the company had losses, it could charge (assess) you for your share and you'd have to mail in a check! Today, virtually all stocks are non-assessable so you can't lose more than you invest. Page 14.

What are Stock Buy Backs?
New investors should understand stock buy back plans and share repurchase plans because they are important to your profits. When a company buys back its own stock, each remaining share represents a bigger equity ownership stake in the business. Over time, intelligent stock buy back programs can enrich long-term shareholders and lead to higher dividends and per share profits. Page 17.

What Is Preferred Stock?
Preferred stock is a special class of stock issued by a company that pays dividends. Preferred stock is more like a bond than true stock because the main appeal is dividend income. Most preferred stocks are limited in the total profit they can earn. Page 12.

What Is a Trailing Stop Order?
A trailing stop order can let you protect profits. As the stock price goes up, you can tell your broker to keep trailing it and only sell if it falls, say, $2 from its highest price ever. At that point, the order gets converted to a market order. Page 11.

What Is a Stop Order or Stop Limit Order?
A sell stop order would allow an investor to avoid further losses or protect a profit if a stock drops below a certain level. The order then gets sent to the exchange and becomes a market order when triggered. Page 9.

What Is a Stock Broker?
A stock broker is a licensed professional that buys and sells stocks, bonds, or mutual funds for you through a brokerage account. They charge you a commission, often less than $15 per trade. They just execute trades; they are not a financial planner. Page 4.

Is Investing for Women Different?
Investing for women is easy! There is no glass ceiling when it comes to investing because your stocks, businesses, bonds, real estate, and other properties don't know or care which gender you are! I've put together a special step-by-step guide for female investors and those interested in investing for women that you can read. Page 8.

What Is a Stock Spin Off?
A stock spin off can be a great source of profit for investors. Sometimes, a company wants to get rid of a division or business. To avoid taxes, it can spin off the company to its existing stockholders, mailing them shares of the business. After the spin off, the investors owns shares in two separate businesses. Page 18.

Will I Owe Money If a Stock Goes Bankrupt?
If a stock you owns goes bankrupt, you probably won't owe any money unless you've borrowed on margin. A rare exception would be if you own

financial-statements
Everyone talks about stocks but few people understand them. This investing for beginners guide was put together so you could learn the 101 most frequently asked questions about stocks and the stock market in only a few minutes, putting you years ahead of the average American in understand what stocks are, how they work, and what some common terms mean.

What Is Market Capitalization?
Stock market capitalization is the cost to buy all (every single share) of a company's stock at the current market price. If a company trades at $8 per share and has 1 million shares, market capitalization is $8 million.

What Is a Holding Company?
A holding company is a business that doesn't engage in any activity except owning assets. It is like a big, giant corporate brokerage account (e.g., Berkshire Hathaway owns GEICO and Benjamin Moore but doesn't actually do anything on its own.). Page 12.

What Is an IPO?
An IPO, or initial public offering, is when a company issues stock in itself for the first time to outside investors. Without IPO's, you wouldn't be able to buy any stocks unless you knew the owners of a company and got them to issue shares directly. Page 11.

What is a Proxy Statement?
A proxy statement is sent to shareholders before the shareholder meeting and includes information electing the board of directors, passing corporate by-law changes, approving large mergers or acquisitions, and voting on stockholder proposals. Page 10.

What Is Private Equity?
Private equity is an investment in a private company that is not available to the public through a broker. If you buy stock in or loan money to a family-owned winery, for example, you would be making a private equity investment. Page 16.

What Is the Capital Gains Tax?
Capital gains tax rates often depend upon how long they an investment has been held. The longer an investment is owned, the lower the capital gains tax. Some asset classes, such as real estate, have special capital gains tax rules and benefits. Page 10.

What Is a Bull Market?
A bull market is a stock market or other financial market where prices rise by 20% or more. A bull market is the opposite of a bear market. The name originates from the fact that bulls attack by thrusting their prey into the air with their horns. Page 5.

What is a 10K?
A 10K is a document the Securities and Exchange Commission requires all publicly traded companies to file showing profits, losses, assets, debts, net worth, and much, much more. For those who invest in individual stocks, the 10K is extremely important. Page 8.

What Is the Dow Jones Industrial Average?
What is the Dow Jones Industrial Average? The Dow Jones Industrial Average is an index (list), designed to track the performance of 30 giant corporations that act as a proxy for the entire United States economy. The stocks in the Dow are chosen by the editors of The Wall Street Journal and represent a broad cross section of the American economy.

What is GAAP Accounting?
GAAP, which is short for Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, is a set of rules that all publicly traded companies must use to manage their financial statements so investors have a consistent framework to understand what they are reading. Page 7.

What Is Asset Allocation?
Asset allocation is the discipline of putting a certain percentage of your money into different asset classes so you aren't at risk of losing everything if one market (such as real estate) blows up and crashes. Asset allocation models are a great tool. Page 14.

101 Things You Always Wanted to Know About Stocks (But Were Too Afraid to Ask)
Everyone talks about stocks but few people understand them. This investing for beginners guide was put together so you could learn the 101 most frequently asked questions about stocks and the stock market in only a few minutes, putting you years ahead of the average American in understand what stocks are, how they work, and what some common terms mean.

101 Things You Always Wanted to Know About Stocks (But Were Too Afraid to Ask)
Everyone talks about stocks but few people understand them. This investing for beginners guide was put together so you could learn the 101 most frequently asked questions about stocks and the stock market in only a few minutes, putting you years ahead of the average American in understand what stocks are, how they work, and what some common terms mean.

101 Things You Always Wanted to Know About Stocks (But Were Too Afraid to Ask)
Everyone talks about stocks but few people understand them. This investing for beginners guide was put together so you could learn the 101 most frequently asked questions about stocks and the stock market in only a few minutes, putting you years ahead of the average American in understand what stocks are, how they work, and what some common terms mean.

101 Things You Always Wanted to Know About Stocks (But Were Too Afraid to Ask)
Everyone talks about stocks but few people understand them. This investing for beginners guide was put together so you could learn the 101 most frequently asked questions about stocks and the stock market in only a few minutes, putting you years ahead of the average American in understand what stocks are, how they work, and what some common terms mean.

101 Things You Always Wanted to Know About Stocks (But Were Too Afraid to Ask)
Everyone talks about stocks but few people understand them. This investing for beginners guide was put together so you could learn the 101 most frequently asked questions about stocks and the stock market in only a few minutes, putting you years ahead of the average American in understand what stocks are, how they work, and what some common terms mean.

101 Things You Always Wanted to Know About Stocks (But Were Too Afraid to Ask)
Everyone talks about stocks but few people understand them. This investing for beginners guide was put together so you could learn the 101 most frequently asked questions about stocks and the stock market in only a few minutes, putting you years ahead of the average American in understand what stocks are, how they work, and what some common terms mean.

101 Things You Always Wanted to Know About Stocks (But Were Too Afraid to Ask)
Everyone talks about stocks but few people understand them. This investing for beginners guide was put together so you could learn the 101 most frequently asked questions about stocks and the stock market in only a few minutes, putting you years ahead of the average American in understand what stocks are, how they work, and what some common terms mean.

101 Things You Always Wanted to Know About Stocks (But Were Too Afraid to Ask)
Everyone talks about stocks but few people understand them. This investing for beginners guide was put together so you could learn the 101 most frequently asked questions about stocks and the stock market in only a few minutes, putting you years ahead of the average American in understand what stocks are, how they work, and what some common terms mean.

The Basics - Investing FAQ for New Investors
The Beginner's Corner provides answers to frequently asked questions posed by new investors such as,

Diversification
One of the cornerstones of any good investment portfolio is ample diversification. This includes diversifying your assets, income streams, legal structures, geographic risks, currency risks, management risks, and a host of other factors. This collection of articles was put together to help you learn more about the topic.

Making Money
These articles are devoted to making money and teaching you some ways you might be able to begin making money from your investments. They include articles about stocks, bonds, mutual funds, real estate, and other assets, so you will learn the difference between making money from dividends on stocks to interest income on bonds.

Equity Funds and Stock Funds
Equity funds are a type of mutual fund focused on buying shares of stock in publicly traded companies. Equity funds are also sometimes called stock funds and are among the most popular types of mutual funds available to investors.

Mutual Fund Companies
There are many mutual fund companies offering a wide range of mutual funds. Here, I'll discuss some of the largest and most successful mutual fund companies, including some company history, investment philosophy, and links for more information.

What Is a Mutual Fund?
Have you ever asked what is a mutual fund and why should you consider investing in them? This collection of investment articles was designed to answer your