Chemistry Sitemap - Page 15 2016-09-26

Chemistry Cat - Lick the Spoon
Chemistry Cat knows: The first rule of Chemistry Lab...Never lick the spoon! Page 84.

Chemistry Cat - Iron Deficiency
Chemistry Cat explains why his pants are wrinkly. Page 87.

Chemistry Cat - Sulfuring
Chemistry Cat is sorry for the smell and your sulfuring. Page 85.

Chemistry Cat - Antigravity Book
Chemistry cat cannot stop reading the book on anti-gravity. Page 80.

Chemistry Cat - Poor Moon
Chemistry cat branches into astronomy and notices the moon has hit hard times. Page 77.

Chemistry Cat - Subatomic Ducks
Chemistry cat knows about subatomic waterfowl. Page 79.

Chemistry Cat - Light Prism
Chemistry cat explains how bad light is punished. Page 78.

Chemistry Cat - Nobelium
Chemistry cat denies knowing about nobelium. Page 86.

Chemistry Cat - Degrees
Chemistry cat lets us know degrees are better than just graduating. Page 81.

Chemistry Cat - BrB
Chemistry cat suddenly remembers something he forgot and will be right back. Page 82.

Chemistry Cat - Sodium Fish
Chemistry Cat is quite knowledgeable about fish. Page 83.

Chemistry Cat - Blowing In The Wind
Chemistry Cat asks,

Chemistry Cat - LiAr
Chemistry cat does not believe you. Page 75.

Chemistry Cat - Copper More
Chemistry cat has more puns. Page 76.

Chemistry Cat - Lead and Jelly
Chemistry Cat: No, I'm not trying to poison you...now finish your Pb and jelly sandwich. Page 62.

Chemistry Cat - Nitric Oxide
Chemistry Cat: Wanna hear a joke about nitric oxide? NO. Page 58.

Chemistry Cat - OK Date
Chemistry Cat: Did you hear oxygen and potassium went on a date? It went OK. Page 56.

Chemistry Cat - Old Chemists
Chemistry Cat: Chemists don't die, they just stop reacting. Page 55.

Chemistry Cat - Oxidants Happen
Chemistry Cat: I blew up my chemistry experiment. Oxidants happen. Page 63.

Chemistry Cat - Potassium Joke
Chemistry Cat: Tell a potassium joke? K. Page 59.

Chemistry Cat - Precipitate
Chemistry Cat: If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate. Page 64.

Chemistry Cat - Smooth Pickup Line
Chemistry Cat: You must be made of uranium and iodine...because all I can see is U and I. Page 60.

Chemistry Cat: No Alcohol Problem
Chemistry Cat: Alcohol is not a problem, it's a solution. Page 57.

Chemistry Cat Periodically Likes Jokes
Chemistry Cat: How often do I like jokes about chemistry? Periodically. Page 61.

Chemistry Cat - Radioactive Cat
Chemistry Cat: Radioactive cat has 18 half-lives. Page 65.

Chemistry Cat - Boron
Chemistry Cat: No one uses this meme anymore, I guess people think it's boron. Page 66.

Chemistry Cat - Oxidants Happen
Chemistry Cat: I blew up my chemistry experiment...oxidants happen. Page 68.

Chemistry Cat - Sneeze
Chemistry Cat: What sound did the chemist make when calcium acetate got up his nose? Ca(CH3COO)2. Page 67.

Grumpy Cat Meme - Nitric Oxide Joke
Grumpy Cat is a newer meme than Chemistry Cat, but he has a lot of potential. Page 69.

Chemistry Cat - That's A Salt
My science teacher threw sodium chloride at me. That's a salt. Page 70.

Chemistry Cat - Two Types of People
There are two types of people in this world: Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data. Page 71.

Chemistry Cat - Boron Date
Chemistry Cat has a 'boron' date. Page 72.

Chemistry Cat - Sore Teeth
Poor Chemistry Cat had some painful dental work done. Page 73.

Cheap Chemistry Cat
Chemistry Cat: Why do chemists like nitrates so much? They're cheaper than day rates. Page 47.

Chemistry Cat - 007
Chemistry Cat: The name's bond. Ionic Bond. Taken, not shared. Page 39.

Chemistry Cat - Chemistry or Cooking?
Chemistry Cat: What's the difference between chemistry and cooking? In chemistry, you never lick the spoon. Page 52.

Chemistry Cat - Heavy Metal Fan
Chemistry Cat: What's my favorite heavy metal group? Lanthanides. Page 34.

Chemistry Cat - Lost An Electron
Chemistry Cat: Lost your electron? Gotta keep an ion them. Page 36.

Chemistry Cat - Medical Elements
Chemistry Cat: Why do they call helium, curium and barium the medical elements? Because if you can't 'helium' or 'curium', you 'barium'. Page 44.

Chemistry Cat - Mole of Moles
Chemistry Cat: If a mole of moles are digging a mole of holes, what do you see? A mole of molasses. Page 43.

Chemistry Cat - Neutrons Drink Free
Chemistry Cat: Neutron wants to pay tab. Bartender says

Chemistry Cat - No Chemistry
Chemistry Cat: A physicist and a biologist had a relationship, but there was no chemistry. Page 45.

Chemistry Cat - No Reaction
Chemistry Cat: I told a chemistry joke. There was no reaction. Page 50.

Chemistry Cat - Noble Gas Jokes
Chemistry Cat: I hate telling noble gas jokes. There's never a reaction. Page 46.

Chemistry Cat - None of Your Bismuth
Chemistry Cat: What am I working on? None of your bismuth. Page 51.

Chemistry Cat - OMG
Chemistry Cat: Did you hear about oxygen and magnesium? OMG! Page 54.

Chemistry Cat - Optimist or Pessimist?
Chemistry Cat: The optimist sees the glass half full. The pessimist sees the glass half empty. The chemist sees the glass completely full, half in the liquid state and half in the vapor state. Page 35.

Chemistry Cat - Sodium Hypobromite
Chemistry Cat:

Chemistry Cat - Sodium Jokes
Chemistry Cat: Do I know any jokes about sodium? Na. Page 41.

Chemistry Cat - Water Joke
Chemistry Cat: HOH HOH HOH Water Joke. Page 40.

Chemistry Cat Can't Think of Good Joke
Chemistry Cat: Sitting at computer for hours. Ion-estly can't think of one good joke. Page 53.

Chemistry Cat Complains
Chemistry Cat: I got this extra electron I didn't want. My friend said don't be so negative. Page 49.

Chemistry Cat Keeping Tabs
Chemistry Cat: Hey Baby I got my ion you. Page 38.

Chemistry Cat Pay Scale
Chemistry Cat: How much do I make? Iron enough. Page 37.

Chemistry Cat - Argon
Chemistry Cat: I think all the good chemistry jokes argon. Page 12.

Chemistry Cat - Batman
Chemistry Cat: sodium sodium sodium sodium sodium sodium sodium sodium BATMAN! Page 15.

Chemistry Cat - Bohring
Chemistry Cat: Electron Configuration? How Bohring! Page 14.

Chemistry Cat - Cat-astrophe
Chemistry Cat: If you don't mix these chemicals correctly -- it could be a cat-astrophe. Page 20.

Chemistry Cat - Cations
Chemistry Cat: Cation ions are

Chemistry Cat - Corny Joke
Chemistry Cat: I had a joke about cobalt, radon, and yttrium...but it's kind of CoRnY. Page 18.

Chemistry Cat - Covalent Bond
Chemistry Cat: You have a joke about covalent bonds? Do share. Page 17.

Chemistry Cat - Dead Chemists
Chemistry Cat: What do you do with a dead chemist? Barium. Page 16.

Chemistry Cat - EDTA Joke
Chemistry Cat: Jokes about EDTA? Too Complex. Page 25.

Chemistry Cat - Elemental Chemistry Joke
Chemistry Cat: Don't understand chemistry jokes? They're elemental. Page 24.

Chemistry Cat - Ether Bunny
Chemistry Cat: What is the name of the molecule bunny-O-bunny? An ether bunny. Page 23.

Chemistry Cat - FeLiNe
Chemistry Cat: Cats are composed of iron, lithium and neon: FeLiNe. Page 21.

Chemistry Cat - Febreeze
Chemistry Cat: Wht do you call iron blowing in the wind? Febreeze. Page 22.

Chemistry Cat - God Particle
Chemistry Cat: Every time a journalist says

Chemistry Cat - Gold Joke
Chemistry Cat: Au wanna hear a joke about gold? Page 33.

Chemistry Cat - Gone Fission
Chemistry Cat: Lab closed...Gone fission. Page 29.

Chemistry Cat - Guacamole
Chemistry Cat: What do you get when you cut an avocado into 6x10^23 pieces? Guacamole. Page 28.

Chemistry Cat - H2O2
Chemistry Cat: Two men walk into a bar. One orders H2O. The second orders H2O too. The second man died. Page 27.

Chemistry Cat - Lightweight Hydrogen
Chemistry Cat:

Chemistry Cat - Little Timmy
Chemistry Cat: Little Timmy took a drink, but he shall drink no more for what he thought was H2O, was H2SO4. Page 26.

Chemistry Cat - Organic Carbon
Chemistry Cat: Summary of organic chemistry: Carbon is a whore. Page 13.

Cool Chemistry Cat
Chemistry Cat: Exothermic reactions? I studied them before they were cool. Page 32.

Chemistry Cat - Chemistry Puns
Chemistry Cat: Chemistry puns? I'm in my element. Page 2.

Chemistry Cat - Gold Joke
Chemistry Cat: Gold? Au Yeeeeaaaaah! Page 11.

Chemistry Cat - Periodic Table
Chemistry Cat: Chemistry cat does it on the table, periodically. Page 5.

Chemistry Cat - Prephosphorus!
Chemistry Cat: Most people find chemistry jokes funny. I find them prephosphorus. Page 3.

Chemistry Cat - Schrodinger's Cat
Chemistry Cat: Schrodinger's cat walks into a bar...and doesn't. Page 7.

Chemistry Cat - Spanish Silicon
Chemistry Cat: Is silicon the same in Spanish? Si! Page 6.

Chemistry Cat - Tungsten Joke
Chemistry Cat - I know there's another chemistry joke...it's on the tip of my tungsten. Page 4.

Chemistry Cat - Yo Mamma Joke
Chemistry Cat: Yo' mamma so ugly...not even fluorine would bond with her. Page 10.

Chemistry Cat - You Positive?
Chemistry Cat: Lost an electron? You positive? Page 9.

Chemistry Cat - Zero K
Chemistry Cat: I've recently decided to freeze myself to -273 degrees C. My family thinks I'll die but I think I'll be 0K. Page 8.

Chemistry Cat
Chemistry Cat - Uncaptioned

Best of Chemistry Cat - Science Meme
This is a collection of the best of the Chemistry Cat meme.

Best of Chemistry Cat - Science Meme
This is a collection of the best of the Chemistry Cat meme.

Best of Chemistry Cat - Science Meme
This is a collection of the best of the Chemistry Cat meme.

Best of Chemistry Cat - Science Meme
This is a collection of the best of the Chemistry Cat meme.

Best of Chemistry Cat - Science Meme
This is a collection of the best of the Chemistry Cat meme.

Best of Chemistry Cat - Science Meme
This is a collection of the best of the Chemistry Cat meme.

Best of Chemistry Cat - Science Meme
This is a collection of the best of the Chemistry Cat meme.

Functional Groups
Functional groups are groups of atoms found within molecules that are involved in the chemical reactions characteristic of those molecules. Functional groups can pertain to any molecules, but you will usually hear about them in the context of organic chemistry. The symbol R and R' refer to an attached hydrogen or hydrocarbon side chain or sometimes to any group of atoms.

Functional Groups
Functional groups are groups of atoms found within molecules that are involved in the chemical reactions characteristic of those molecules. Functional groups can pertain to any molecules, but you will usually hear about them in the context of organic chemistry. The symbol R and R' refer to an attached hydrogen or hydrocarbon side chain or sometimes to any group of atoms.

Functional Groups
Functional groups are groups of atoms found within molecules that are involved in the chemical reactions characteristic of those molecules. Functional groups can pertain to any molecules, but you will usually hear about them in the context of organic chemistry. The symbol R and R' refer to an attached hydrogen or hydrocarbon side chain or sometimes to any group of atoms.

Functional Groups
Functional groups are groups of atoms found within molecules that are involved in the chemical reactions characteristic of those molecules. Functional groups can pertain to any molecules, but you will usually hear about them in the context of organic chemistry. The symbol R and R' refer to an attached hydrogen or hydrocarbon side chain or sometimes to any group of atoms.

Functional Groups
Functional groups are groups of atoms found within molecules that are involved in the chemical reactions characteristic of those molecules. Functional groups can pertain to any molecules, but you will usually hear about them in the context of organic chemistry. The symbol R and R' refer to an attached hydrogen or hydrocarbon side chain or sometimes to any group of atoms.

Downloadable Graph Paper
You can download this graph paper or grid paper to print it to use whenever you want. Several different types of graph paper are available, including graph paper with X-Y axis and graph paper with different numbers of lines per square inch.

Glowstick Chemical Reaction
Glowstick Chemical Reaction. Chemistry. Page 4.

Translation
This diagram depicts the translation of mRNA and the synthesis of proteins by ribosomes in the cell. Page 6.

Nylon Synthesis - General Reaction
This is the general reaction for the polymerization of nylon as a result of condensation polymerization of dicarboxylic acid and diamine. Page 8.

Chemiluminescence Reaction
Chemiluminescence Reaction. Chemistry. Page 3.

Chemiluminescence Reaction - TCPO
Chemiluminescence Reaction - TCPO. Page 2.

Bromine Photo
This is a picture of the element bromine in a vial encased in a block of acrylic. Bromine is liquid at room temperature. Page 7.

Chlorine Liquid
This is a sample of the element chlorine in its liquid form. Page 5.

Chlorine Liquid
This is a flask of liquid chlorine. Chlorine gas and liquid are yellow. Page 6.

Iodine Crystal
This is a crystal of pure iodine. Solid iodine is a lustrous blue-black color. The crystal is 0.1 g iodine. Page 9.

Iodine Vapor
This is a flask of elemental iodine vapor. Page 8.

Astatine
Astatine possesses characteristics common to other halogens, except with more metallic properties. Page 11.

Chlorine Gas
This is a sample of pure chlorine gas. Chlorine gas is a pale greenish yellow color. Page 4.

Chlorine
Chlorine. Chemistry. Page 3.

Fluorine Simulant
The element fluorine is a greenish yellow gas. This a simulant, showing how fluorine appears. The real element would corrode even borosilicate glass.

Fluorine
Pure fluorine is a corrosive pale yellowish brown gas. Page 2.

Iodine Crystals
These are crystals of the halogen element, iodine. Solid iodine is a lustrous blue-black color. Page 10.

Borax Crystal Snowflake
Dr. Helmenstine is holding a borax crystal snowflake that she grew overnight.

Borax Crystals - Borax Crystals Photo Gallery
See pictures of borax crystal snowflakes and other examples of borax crystals. The photo gallery was created so that I could keep track of my borax crystal pictures. It should give you a good idea of what to expect when you grow borax crystals.

Blue Borax Crystal Snowflake
The simplest way to grow colored borax crystals is to grow clear crystals over a colored surface, such as a colored pipecleaner or string. Page 4.

Borax Crystal Snowflake
Borax crystals are safe and easy to grow. Page 2.

Borax Mineral
This is a photo of borax crystals from California. Borax is sodium tetraborate or disodium tetraborate. Page 3.

Metallic Blue Borax Crystals
These borax crystals appear to be metallic blue because they were grown over a metallic blue pipecleaner. You can achieve the same effect with other colors, too. Page 5.

D-Aspartic Acid Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-aspartic acid. Page 65.

Tryptophan Chemical Structure
Tryptophan Chemical Structure. Chemistry. Page 66.

D-Gluconic Acid Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-gluconic acid. Page 24.

D-Glutamic Acid Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-glutamic acid. Page 25.

D-Glutamine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-glutamine. Page 23.

D-Histidine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of the amino acid D-histidine. Page 26.

D-Isoleucine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-isoleucine. Page 27.

L-Isoleucine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of L-isoleucine. Page 28.

D-Lysine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-lysine. Page 31.

D-leucine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-leucine. Page 29.

L-leucine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of L-leucine. Page 30.

D-Methionine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-methionine. Page 33.

L-Methionine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of L-methionine. Page 32.

D-Norleucine or D-2-Aminohexanoic Acid Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-norleucine or D-2-aminohexanoic acid. Page 34.

L-Norleucine or L-2-Aminohexanoic Acid Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of L-norleucine or L-2-aminohexanoic acid. Page 36.

Norleucine - 2-Aminohexanoic Acid Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of norleucine or 2-aminohexanoic acid. Page 35.

D-Ornithine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-ornithine. Page 39.

L-Ornithine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of L-ornithine. Page 38.

Ornithine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of ornithine. Page 37.

D-Phenylalanine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-phenylalanine. Page 41.

D-Proline Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-proline. Page 42.

L-Phenylalanine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of L-phenylalanine. Page 40.

L-Proline Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of L-proline. Page 43.

D-Serine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-serine. Page 45.

L-Serine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of L-serine. Page 44.

D-Tyrosine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-tyrosine. Page 49.

L-Glutamic Acid Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of L-glutamic acid. Page 7.

L-Glutamine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of L-glutamine. Page 8.

Glycine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of glycine. Page 9.

L-Histidine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of the amino acid L-histidine. Page 10.

Leucine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of leucine. Page 12.

L-Lysine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of L-lysine (lys). Page 13.

Methionine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of methionine. Page 14.

Phenylalanine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of phenylalanine. Page 15.

Proline Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of proline. Page 16.

Serine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of serine. Page 17.

Threonine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of threonine. Page 18.

Tyrosine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of tyrosine. Page 21.

Valine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of valine. Page 22.

D-Threonine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-threonine. Page 46.

L-Threonine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of L-threonine. Page 47.

L-Tyrosine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of L-tyrosine. Page 48.

D-Valine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of D-valine. Page 50.

L-Valine Chemical Structure
This is the chemical structure of L-valine. Page 51.

Amino Acid Structures
These are the structures for the twenty natural amino acids, plus the general structure for an amino acid.

Amino Acid Structures
These are the structures for the twenty natural amino acids, plus the general structure for an amino acid.

Amino Acid Structures
These are the structures for the twenty natural amino acids, plus the general structure for an amino acid.

Amino Acid Structures
These are the structures for the twenty natural amino acids, plus the general structure for an amino acid.

Amino Acid Structures
These are the structures for the twenty natural amino acids, plus the general structure for an amino acid.

Glowing Cocktails
These cocktails glow in the dark due to the presence of fluorescent chemical compounds. Tonic water, vitamins and chlorophyll are glowing chemicals you can drink. Page 30.

Glowing Slime
Make glowing slime yourself! Chemistry. Page 39.

Glowing Jack-o-Lantern
This spooky Halloween pumpkin glows in the dark. The jack-o-lantern face is formed by the areas that aren't coated with phosphorescent paint. Page 9.

Cyalume Chemiluminescence
This is an example of the chemiluminescence produced by the cyalume reaction in a lightstick: cyalume plus hydrogen peroxide plus dye reacts to yield phenol, carbon dioxide and glowing dye. Page 2.

Bioluminescent Squid
This squid is an example of an animal that is bioluminescent. Page 33.

Chemoluminescent Chemistry Demonstration
This chemistry demonstration is an example of a chemoluminescent reaction. Page 34.

Bioluminescent Jellyfish
This is a bioluminescent comb jellyfish or ctenophore. This particular jellyfish is Bathocyroe fosteri, which lives in the ocean. Page 35.

Fungus Foxfire Bioluminescence
This fungus, the saprobe Panellus Stipticus, is displaying the type of bioluminescence known as foxfire. Foxfire is a natural form of phosphorescence. Page 36.

Luminol Luminescence with Blood
Luminol reacts with the hemoglobin in blood to produce a bright characteristic blue luminescence. Page 37.

Amber Fluorescence
One of the ways you can distinguish real amber from fake amber is to shine an ultraviolet light on the amber sample. Real amber fluoresces. I've included a non-fluorescent mineral so you can see the difference in appearance. Page 18.

Glow in the Dark Test Tube
Glow in the Dark Test Tube. Chemistry. Page 28.

Glowing Petroleum Jelly
Glowing Petroleum Jelly. Chemistry. Page 27.

Urine Fluorescence in Black Light
Urine fluoresces or glows when exposed to black or ultraviolet light. Page 38.

Fluorescent Emperor Scorpion
The Emperor Scorpion fluoresces blue-green under a black light. While the scorpion glows under black light, it is sensitive to injury from ultraviolet light, so it should not be exposed to black light for an extended length of time. The Emperor Scorpion is black or dark brown in normal light. Page 5.

Glowing Irish Spring Soap
Irish Spring soap glows a bright greenish-blue under a black light. Page 17.

Banana Fluorescence Under Black Light
The spots of ripe bananas glow fluorescent blue under a black or ultraviolet lamp. Page 10.

Firefly Glow - Bioluminescence
This is an example of the bioluminescent glow from a firefly, Photinus pyralis.

Fluorescent Minerals
Fluorescent Minerals. Chemistry. Page 6.

Glowing Canola Oil
Glowing Canola Oil. Chemistry. Page 23.

Glowing Laundry Detergent
Glowing Laundry Detergent. Chemistry. Page 24.

Glowing Magic Powerballs
Glowing Magic Powerballs. Chemistry. Page 25.

Jellyfish Bioluminescence
Jellyfish Bioluminescence. Chemistry. Page 4.

Tonic Water Glow
Tonic Water Glow. Chemistry. Page 3.

Glowing Fluorescent Dye
Glowing Fluorescent Dye. Chemistry. Page 16.

Glowing Lego Toys
Glowing Lego Toys. Chemistry. Page 14.

Glowing Mentos Fountain
Glowing Mentos Fountain. Chemistry. Page 15.

Glowing Mountain Dew
Glowing Mountain Dew. Chemistry. Page 21.

Mr. Clean in Black Light
Mr. Clean in Black Light. Chemistry. Page 22.

Glowsticks
Glowsticks. Chemistry. Page 11.

Luminol Chemiluminescence
Luminol Chemiluminescence. Chemistry. Page 12.

Glow in the Dark Geode
Glow in the Dark Geode. Chemistry. Page 31.

Glow in the Dark Ice
Glow in the Dark Ice. Chemistry. Page 8.

Glow in the Dark Slime
Glow in the Dark Slime. Chemistry. Page 13.

Glowing Crystal Snowflake
Glowing Crystal Snowflake. Chemistry. Page 19.

Glowing Drink
Glowing Drink. Chemistry. Page 20.

Glowing Paper Airplane
Glowing Paper Airplane. Chemistry. Page 7.

Glow in the Dark Photo Gallery - Materials That Glow
Here's a collection of photos of materials that glow in the dark. Why do objects glow? It could be due to radioactive decay or a chemiluminescent reaction or any of a variety of other types of luminescence.

Glow in the Dark Photo Gallery - Materials That Glow
Here's a collection of photos of materials that glow in the dark. Why do objects glow? It could be due to radioactive decay or a chemiluminescent reaction or any of a variety of other types of luminescence.

Glow in the Dark Photo Gallery - Materials That Glow
Here's a collection of photos of materials that glow in the dark. Why do objects glow? It could be due to radioactive decay or a chemiluminescent reaction or any of a variety of other types of luminescence.

Annie Jump Cannon (1863 - 1941)
Annie Jump Cannon (1863 - 1941). Chemistry. Page 2.

Archibald Scott Couper (1831 -1892)
Archibald Scott Couper (1831 -1892). Page 20.

Claude Cohen-Tannoudji
Claude Cohen-Tannoudji. Chemistry. Page 15.

Ernst Chladni (1756 - 1827)
Ernst Chladni (1756 - 1827). Chemistry. Page 12.

Harvey Williams Cushing (1869 - 1939)
Harvey Williams Cushing (1869 - 1939). Page 24.

Martin Cooper
Martin Cooper. Chemistry. Page 16.

Melvin Calvin (1911 - 1997)
Melvin Calvin (1911 - 1997). Chemistry.

Michel Eugene Chevreul (1786–1889)
Michel Eugene Chevreul (1786–1889). Page 10.

William Crookes (1832 - 1919)
William Crookes (1832 - 1919). Chemistry. Page 21.

Anders Celsius (1701 - 1744)
Anders Celsius (1701 - 1744). Chemistry. Page 8.

Dorothy Mary Crowfoot Hodgkin (1910 - 1994)
Dorothy Mary Crowfoot Hodgkin with insulin model. Page 22.

Gustave-Gaspard Coriolis (1792 - 1843)
Gustave-Gaspard Coriolis (1792 - 1843). Page 18.

Howard Carter (1874 - 1939)
Howard Carter (1874 - 1939). Chemistry. Page 4.

Jacques Cassini (1677 - 1756)
Jacques Cassini (1677 - 1756). Chemistry. Page 7.

Jean Antoine Claude Chaptal (1756 - 1832)
Jean Antoine Claude Chaptal (1756 - 1832). Page 11.

John Douglas Cockcroft (1897 - 1967)
John Douglas Cockcroft (1897 - 1967). Page 14.

Nicolas Leonard Sadi Carnot (1796 - 1832)
Nicolas Leonard Sadi Carnot (1796 - 1832). Page 3.

Pierre Curie (1859 - 1906)
Pierre Curie (1859 - 1906). Chemistry. Page 23.

Alexis Carrel (1873 - 1944)
Alexis Carrel (1873 - 1944). Chemistry. Page 5.

Charles-Augustin de Coulomb (1736 - 1806)
Charles-Augustin de Coulomb (1736 - 1806). Page 19.

Giovanni Domenico Cassini (1625 - 1712)
Giovanni Domenico Cassini (1625 - 1712). Page 6.

Nicolaus Copernicus (1473 - 1543)
Nicolaus Copernicus (1473 - 1543). Page 17.

Owen Chamberlain (1920 - 2006)
Owen Chamberlain (1920 - 2006). Chemistry. Page 9.

Per Teodor Cleve (1840 - 1905)
Per Teodor Cleve (1840 - 1905). Chemistry. Page 13.

Famous Scientists Last Names Starting with C
This is an image gallery of portaits and photos of famous scientists.

Famous Scientists Last Names Starting with C
This is an image gallery of portaits and photos of famous scientists.

Neon Atom
This diagram shows the electron shell of the neon atom. Page 15.

Sodium Atom
This diagram shows the electron shell configuration for the sodium atom. Page 16.

Magnesium Atom
This diagram shows the electron shell configuration of a magnesium atom. Page 17.

Aluminium Atom
This diagram shows the electron shell configuration for an atom of the element aluminium. Page 18.

Phosphorus Atom
This diagram shows the electron shell configuration of a phosphorus atom. Page 20.

Silicon Atom
This diagram shows the electron shell configuration of a silicon atom. Page 19.

Sulfur Atom
This diagram indicates the electron shell configuration of a sulfur atom. Page 21.

Chlorine Atom
This diagram shows the electron shell configuration of a chlorine atom. Page 22.

Argon Atom
This diagram shows the electron shell configuration of an argon atom. Page 23.

Potassium Atom
This diagram shows the electron shell configuration of a potassium atom. Page 24.

Barium Atom
This diagram of a barium atom shows the electron shell. Page 61.

Caesium Atom
This diagram of a caesium atom shows the electron shell. Page 60.

Erbium Atom
This diagram of a erbium atom shows the electron shell. Page 73.

Gold Atom
This diagram of a gold atom shows the electron shell. Page 84.

Americium Atom
This diagram of an americium atom shows the electron shell. Page 100.

Bohrium Atom
This diagram of a bohrium atom shows the electron shell. Page 112.

Californium Atom
This diagram of a californium atom shows the electron shell. Page 103.

Dubnium Atom
This diagram of a dubnium atom shows the electron shell. Page 110.

Dysprosium Atom
This diagram of a dysprosium atom shows the electron shell. Page 71.

Einsteinium Atom
This diagram of an einsteinium atom shows the electron shell. Page 104.

Fermium Atom
This diagram of a fermium atom shows the electron shell. Page 105.

Francium Atom
This diagram of a francium atom shows the electron shell. Page 92.

Hassium Atom
This diagram of a hassium atom shows the electron shell. Page 113.

Holmium Atom
This diagram of a holmium atom shows the electron shell. Page 72.

Iridium Atom
This diagram of an iridium atom shows the electron shell. Page 82.

Lawrencium Atom
This diagram of a lawrencium atom shows the electron shell. Page 108.

Meitnerium Atom
This diagram of a meitnerium atom shows the electron shell. Page 114.

Mendelevium Atom
This diagram of a mendelevium atom shows the electron shell. Page 106.

Nobelium Atom
This diagram of a nobelium atom shows the electron shell. Page 107.

Osmium Atom
This diagram of an osmium atom shows the electron shell. Page 81.

Platinum Atom
This diagram of a platinum atom shows the electron shell. Page 83.

Plutonium Atom
This diagram of a plutonium atom shows the electron shell. Page 99.

Protactinium Atom
This diagram of a protactinium atom shows the electron shell. Page 96.

Roentgenium Atom
This diagram of a roentgenium atom shows the electron shell. Page 116.

Rutherfordium Atom
This diagram of a rutherfordium atom shows the electron shell. Page 109.

Thorium Atom
This diagram of a thorium atom shows the electron shell. Page 95.

Uranium Atom
This diagram of a uranium atom shows the electron shell. Page 97.

Calcium Atom
This diagram of a calcium atom shows the electron shell. Page 25.

Chromium Atom
This diagram of a chromium atom shows the electron shell. Page 29.

Cobalt Atom
This diagram of a cobalt atom shows the electron shell. Page 32.

Copernicium Atom
This diagram of a copernicium atom shows the electron shell. Page 117.

Copper Atom
This diagram of a copper atom shows the electron shell. Page 34.

Darmstadtium Atom
This diagram of a darmstadtium atom shows the electron shell. Page 115.

Gallium Atom
This diagram of a gallium atom shows the electron shell. Page 36.

Iron Atom
This diagram of an iron atom shows the electron shell. Page 31.

Krypton Atom
This diagram of a krypton atom shows the electron shell. Page 41.

Manganese Atom
This diagram of a manganese atom shows the electron shell. Page 30.

Rubidium Atom
This diagram of a rubidium atom shows the electron shell. Page 42.

Scandium Atom
This diagram of a scandium atom shows the electron shell. Page 26.

Seaborgium Atom
This diagram of a seaborgium atom shows the electron shell. Page 111.

Selenium Atom
This diagram of a selenium atom shows the electron shell. Page 39.

Tin Atom
This diagram of a tin atom shows the electron shell. Page 55.

Titanium Atom
This diagram of a titanium atom shows the electron shell. Page 27.

Ununhexium Atom
This diagram of an ununhexium atom shows the electron shell. Page 121.

Ununoctium Atom
This diagram of an ununoctium atom shows the electron shell. Page 123.

Ununpentium Atom
This diagram of an ununpentium atom shows the electron shell. Page 119.

Ununquadium Atom
This diagram of an ununquadium atom shows the electron shell. Page 120.

Ununseptium Atom
This diagram of an ununseptium atom shows the electron shell. Page 122.

Ununtrium Atom
This diagram of an ununtrium atom shows the electron shell. Page 118.

Vanadium Atom
This diagram of a vanadium atom shows the electron shell. Page 28.

Yttrium Atom
This diagram of a yttrium atom shows the electron shell. Page 44.

Zinc Atom
This diagram of a zinc atom shows the electron shell. Page 35.

Antimony Atom
This diagram of an antimony atom shows the electron shell. Page 56.

Arsenic Atom
This diagram of an arsenic atom shows the electron shell. Page 38.

Astatine Atom
This diagram of an astatine atom shows the electron shell. Page 90.

Bromine Atom
This diagram of a bromine atom shows the electron shell. Page 40.

Cadmium Atom
This diagram of a cadmium atom shows the electron shell. Page 53.

Europium Atom
This diagram of an europium atom shows the electron shell. Page 68.

Gadolinium Atom
This diagram of a gadolinium atom shows the electron shell. Page 69.

Germanium Atom
This diagram of a germanium atom shows the electron shell. Page 37.

Indium Atom
This diagram of an indium atom shows the electron shell. Page 54.

Iodine Atom
This diagram of an iodine atom shows the electron shell. Page 58.

Nickel Atom
This diagram of a nickel atom shows the electron shell. Page 33.

Niobium Atom
This diagram of a niobium atom shows the electron shell. Page 46.

Palladium Atom
This diagram of a palladium atom shows the electron shell. Page 51.

Radon Atom
This diagram of a radon atom shows the electron shell. Page 91.

Rhenium Atom
This diagram of a rhenium atom shows the electron shell. Page 80.

Rhodium Atom
This diagram of a rhodium atom shows the electron shell. Page 50.

Ruthenium Atom
This diagram of a ruthenium atom shows the electron shell. Page 49.

Samarium Atom
This diagram of a samarium atom shows the electron shell. Page 67.

Silver Atom
This diagram of a silver atom shows the electron shell. Page 52.

Tantalum Atom
This diagram of a tantalum atom shows the electron shell. Page 78.

Technetium Atom
This diagram of a technetium atom shows the electron shell. Page 48.

Tellurium Atom
This diagram of a tellurium atom shows the electron shell. Page 57.

Terbium Atom
This diagram of a terbium atom shows the electron shell. Page 70.

Tungsten Atom
This diagram of a tungsten atom shows the electron shell. Page 79.

Xenon Atom
This diagram of a xenon atom shows the electron shell. Page 59.

Zirconium Atom
This diagram of a zirconium atom shows the electron shell. Page 45.

Actinium Atom
This diagram of an actinium atom shows the electron shell. Page 94.

Berkelium Atom
This diagram of a berkelium atom shows the electron shell. Page 102.

Bismuth Atom
This diagram of a bismuth atom shows the electron shell. Page 88.

Cerium Atom
This diagram of a cerium atom shows the electron shell. Page 63.

Curium Atom
This diagram of a curium atom shows the electron shell. Page 101.

Hafnium Atom
This diagram of a hafnium atom shows the electron shell. Page 77.

Lanthanum Atom
This diagram of a lanthanum atom shows the electron shell. Page 62.

Lead Atom
This diagram of a lead atom shows the electron shell. Page 87.

Lutetium Atom
This diagram of a lutetium atom shows the electron shell. Page 76.

Mercury Atom
This diagram of a mercury atom shows the electron shell. Page 85.

Molybdenum Atom
This diagram of a molybdenum atom shows the electron shell. Page 47.

Neodymium Atom
This diagram of a neodymium atom shows the electron shell. Page 65.

Polonium Atom
This diagram of a polonium atom shows the electron shell. Page 89.

Praseodymium Atom
This diagram of a praseodymium atom shows the electron shell. Page 64.

Promethium Atom
This diagram of a promethium atom shows the electron shell. Page 66.

Strontium Atom
This diagram of a strontium atom shows the electron shell. Page 43.

Thallium Atom
This diagram of a thallium atom shows the electron shell. Page 86.

Thulium Atom
This diagram of a thulium atom shows the electron shell. Page 74.

Ytterbium Atom
This diagram of a ytterbium atom shows the electron shell. Page 75.

Atom Diagrams - Diagrams of Atoms and Isotopes
This is a collection of diagrams of atoms, showing the numbers of protons, neutrons, and electrons present in the atom or isotope of an element.

Atom Diagrams - Diagrams of Atoms and Isotopes
This is a collection of diagrams of atoms, showing the numbers of protons, neutrons, and electrons present in the atom or isotope of an element.

Atom Diagrams - Diagrams of Atoms and Isotopes
This is a collection of diagrams of atoms, showing the numbers of protons, neutrons, and electrons present in the atom or isotope of an element.

Atom Diagrams - Diagrams of Atoms and Isotopes
This is a collection of diagrams of atoms, showing the numbers of protons, neutrons, and electrons present in the atom or isotope of an element.

Atom Diagrams - Diagrams of Atoms and Isotopes
This is a collection of diagrams of atoms, showing the numbers of protons, neutrons, and electrons present in the atom or isotope of an element.

Atom Diagrams - Diagrams of Atoms and Isotopes
This is a collection of diagrams of atoms, showing the numbers of protons, neutrons, and electrons present in the atom or isotope of an element.

Atom Diagrams - Diagrams of Atoms and Isotopes
This is a collection of diagrams of atoms, showing the numbers of protons, neutrons, and electrons present in the atom or isotope of an element.

Atom Diagrams - Diagrams of Atoms and Isotopes
This is a collection of diagrams of atoms, showing the numbers of protons, neutrons, and electrons present in the atom or isotope of an element.

Atom Diagrams - Diagrams of Atoms and Isotopes
This is a collection of diagrams of atoms, showing the numbers of protons, neutrons, and electrons present in the atom or isotope of an element.

Atom Diagrams - Diagrams of Atoms and Isotopes
This is a collection of diagrams of atoms, showing the numbers of protons, neutrons, and electrons present in the atom or isotope of an element.

Lithium Metal
This is a photograph of lithium metal in liquid paraffin oil. Page 2.

Lithium Metal
These are ingots of pure lithium metal, showing a thin layer of black oxide tarnish. Page 3.

Lithium
Lithium is a corrosive silvery metal.

Potassium Metal
These are chunks of potassium metal. Potassium is a soft, silvery-white metal that quickly oxidizes. Page 7.

Potassium
Chunk of potassium metal with peroxides/superoxides (yellow crystals) and ozonide (red coloring) on its surface. Page 6.

Sodium
Sodium metal chunks under mineral oil. Page 4.

Cesium Crystals
This is a high-purity sample of cesium crystals maintaining in an ampule under an argon atmosphere. Page 11.

Cesium
Cesium is a soft silvery-gold metal with a melting point of 28C (83F). The element is shown here in liquid form. Page 10.

Francium Simulant
Francium is extremely rare, so it isn't an element that can be photographed, but it could be expected to look something like this. Page 13.

Potassium Metal Beads
These are beads of the metal potassium. The beads, which sort of resemble pearls, are kept in paraffin to prevent the reactive metal from oxidizing. Page 8.

Rubidium
This is a sample of pure liquid rubidium metal. The colored rubidium superoxide is visible inside the ampule. Page 9.

Cesium Metal
This is an ampule containing pure cesium or caesium metal, which is a liquid at elevated temperatures. Page 12.

Sodium Metal
Sodium is a soft, silvery reactive metal. Page 5.

Alkali Metals Photo Gallery
See examples of the members of the alkali metals element group and learn about the periodic properties of the alkali metals.

Diamond - Carbon
This is an AGS ideal cut diamond from Russia (Sergio Fleuri). Diamond is one of the forms taken by pure carbon. Page 5.

Fullerene Crystals - Carbon Crystals
These are fullerene crystals of carbon. Each crystal unit consists of 60 carbon atoms. Page 4.

Graphite Carbon
Photograph of graphite, one of the forms of elemental carbon. Page 3.

Hydrogen Glow
This is a vial containing ultrapure hydrogen gas. Hydrogen is a colorless gas that glows violet when ionized. Page 2.

Hydrogen
NGC 604, a region of ionized hydrogen in the Triangulum Galaxy.

Liquid Nitrogen
This is a photo of liquid nitrogen being poured from a dewar. Page 7.

Liquid Oxygen
Liquid oxygen in an unsilvered dewar flask. Liquid oxygen is blue. Page 9.

Nitrogen Glow
This is the glow given off by ionized nitrogen in a gas discharge tube. The purplish glow seen around lightning strikes is the color of the ionized nitrogen in air. Page 6.

Oxygen Glow
This photo shows the emission of oxygen in a gas discharge tube. Page 10.

Phosphorus Allotropes
Pure phosphorus exists in several forms called allotropes. This photo shows waxy white phosphorus (yellow cut), red phosphorus, violet phosphorus and black phosphorus. The allotropes of phosphorus have markedly different properties from each other. Page 11.

Nitrogen
Image of solid, liquid, and gaseous nitrogen. Page 8.

Selenium
Selenium occurs in several forms, but is most stable as a dense gray semiconducting semimetal. Black, gray, and red selenium are shown here. Page 15.

Selenium
This is a wafer of ultrapure selenium. This is the vitreous form of amorphous selenium, which is black. Page 16.

Sulfur Crystals
Crystals of the nonmetallic element sulfur. Page 13.

Sulfur Crystals
These are crystals of sulfur, one of the nonmetallic elements. Page 14.

Sulfur
Elemental sulfur melts from a yellow solid into a blood-red liquid. It burns with a blue flame. Page 12.

Nonmetals Photo Gallery
See examples of the members of the nonmetal element group and learn about the periodic properties of the nonmetals.

Artificial Neon Sign
This artificial neon sign glows because the plastic tubing used to make the sign is fluorescent under ultraviolet light, as is the liquid filling the tubing (highlighter ink in water). Page 8.

Black Light or Ultraviolet Lamp
Black Light or Ultraviolet Lamp. Chemistry.

Fluorescent Minerals Key
Fluorescent Minerals Key. Chemistry. Page 6.

Fluorescent Minerals
Fluorescent Minerals. Chemistry. Page 5.

Glowing Fluorescent Dye
Glowing Fluorescent Dye. Chemistry. Page 4.

Glowing Magic Powerballs
Glowing Magic Powerballs. Chemistry. Page 7.

Phosphorescence Example
Phosphorescence Example. Chemistry. Page 2.

Tonic Water Fluorescence
Tonic Water Fluorescence. Chemistry. Page 3.

Uranium Glass - Vaseline Glass
Uranium, usually in the form of the diuranate oxide, is added to glass prior to melting it to produce uranium glass or vaseline glass. Uranium glass exhibits a characteristic green fluorescence under black or ultraviolet light. Page 9.

Alum Crystal
Alum crystals are probably the easiest crystals to grow. The chemical is non-toxic and the crystals grow quickly and reliably. Page 10.

Alum Crystal
This alum crystal grew overnight. Page 11.

Aluminium Potassium Sulfate Crystal
This is a large crystal of alum, or aluminium potassium sulfate. Page 12.

Alum Crystal After One Day
You usually can get a nice alum crystal overnight. If you let the crystal grow for a day or more, you can get larger crystals. Page 9.

Alum Crystal Pyramid
Alum crystals can be found in a few different shapes. This is an alum crystal pyramid. Page 5.

Alum Crystal
This is a crystal of alum, a kitchen spice. Alum crystals are easy to grow and can become quite large. Page 6.

Chromium Alum Crystal
This is a chromium alum crystal. Page 4.

Glow in the Dark Alum Crystals
These easy-to-grow alum crystals glow, thanks to the addition of a little fluorescent dye to the crystal growing solution. Page 7.

Potassium Alum Crystal
This is a crystal of potassium alum or potash alum. Food coloring was added to these crystals, which are clear when the alum is pure. Page 3.

Alum Crystal
This is a single alum crystal. The shape of the crystal is the most common form taken by alum crystals grown under ordinary household conditions.

Alum Crystals
Alum crystals are popular crystals to grow because the ingredient may be purchased at the grocery store and the crystals only take a few hours to grow. Page 2.

Blue Rock Candy Crystals
This blue rock candy is practically the same color as the sky. Rock candy is made from sugar crystals. It is easy to color and flavor the crystals. Page 13.

Blue and Green Rock Candy
Rock candy consists of sugar crystals. You can grow rock candy yourself. If you don't add any coloring the rock candy will be the color of the sugar you used. You can add food coloring if you'd like to color the crystals. Page 8.

Brown Sugar Rock Candy
Brown Sugar Rock Candy. Chemistry. Page 9.

Green Rock Candy Swizzle Stick
What's a swizzle stick? It's a stick of sugar crystals or rock candy that you swirl around in a drink to sweeten and flavor it. Page 14.

Homemade Blue Sugar Crystals
The sugar crystals of homemade rock candy tend to be smaller than the sugar crystals you see on commercial rock candy. You can grow larger crystals if you coat your string or stick with crushed rock candy from a previous batch. Page 7.

Multicolored Rock Candy Sticks
You can make rock candy any color or flavor you like. Page 6.

Red Rock Candy
Here's a stick of red rock candy. Page 15.

Rock Candy Swizzle Sticks
Rock Candy Swizzle Sticks. Chemistry. Page 18.

Sucrose Crystals
Sucrose Crystals. Chemistry. Page 4.

Sucrose or Saccharose
Sucrose or Saccharose. Chemistry.

Sugar Crystals Close-Up
This is a close-up photograph of sugar crystals (sucrose). The area is about 800 x 500 micrometers. Page 19.

Sugar Crystals - Sucrose
This is a photo of magnified crystals of sucrose, or table sugar. Page 5.

Sugar Cube
Sugar Cube. Chemistry. Page 10.

Sugar Cubes
Sugar Cubes. Chemistry. Page 11.

Cortisol
Cortisol. Chemistry. Page 3.

Estradiol
Estradiol. Chemistry. Page 4.

Estriol
Estriol. Chemistry. Page 5.

Testosterone
Testosterone. Chemistry. Page 9.

Cholesterol
Cholesterol. Chemistry. Page 2.

Estrone
Estrone. Chemistry. Page 6.

Progesterone
Progesterone. Chemistry. Page 7.

Progesterone
Progesterone. Chemistry. Page 8.

Colored Fire Pinecones
All you need to do to make a colored fire pinecone is sprinkle the pinecone with a non-toxic colorant. (Science Projects). Page 56.

Fake Neon Sign
You can make a glowing fake neon sign using plastic tubing and a black light. (Science Projects). Page 55.

Glow in the Dark Pumpkin
This spooky Halloween pumpkin glows in the dark. The jack-o-lantern face is formed by the areas that aren't coated with phosphorescent paint. (Science Projects). Page 53.

Potassium Alum Crystal
This is a crystal of potassium alum or potash alum. (Science Projects). Page 58.

Borax Crystal Hearts
Grow borax crystals over a pipecleaner shaped like a heart to create sparkling borax crystal hearts. (Science Projects). Page 62.

Charcoal or Sponge Crystal Garden
Make a chemical crystal garden using salt, ammonia and laundry bluing on pieces of sponge, brick or charcoal. (Science Projects). Page 63.

Salt Crystal Garden Science Project
Grow magical-looking salt crystals from household chemicals. This salt crystal garden is a classic crystal growing project. (Science Projects). Page 64.

Glow in the Dark Flower Science Project
Make a real flower glow in the dark. (Science Projects). Page 65.

Borax Crystal Snowflake
Borax Crystal Snowflake (Science Projects). Page 14.

Bubble Print Science Project
Bubble Print (Science Projects). Chemistry. Page 13.

Colored Easter Eggs
Colored Easter Eggs (Science Projects). Page 38.

Density Column
You can make a colorful many-layered density column using common household liquids. (Science Projects). Page 42.

Ectoplasm Slime
You can make this non-sticky, edible slime from two easy-to-find ingredients. It can be used as ectoplasm for Halloween costumes, haunted houses, and Halloween parties. (Science Projects). Page 54.

Flubber
Flubber is a non-sticky and non-toxic type of slime. (Science Projects). Page 47.

Glow in the Dark Alum Crystals
These easy-to-grow alum crystals glow, thanks to the addition of a little fluorescent dye to the crystal growing solution. (Science Projects). Page 50.

Glowing Jell-O
Glowing Jell-O (Science Projects). Page 20.

Handheld Fireball
You can produce a flame cool enough to hold in your hand. (Science Projects). Page 57.

Homemade Firecrackers
Homemade firecrackers are easy and inexpensive to make. (Science Projects). Page 49.

Homemade Smoke Bomb
This homemade smoke bomb is easy to make and only requires two ingredients. (Science Projects). Page 41.