Chemistry Sitemap - Page 17 2016-09-26

Beer Is Radioactive
Beer is mildly radioactive. Chemistry.

Kitty Litter Is Radioactive
Clay kitty litter emits radiation.

Bananas Are Naturally Radioactive
Bananas contain radioactive potassium as well as non-radioactive isotopes.

Radioactive Smoke Detectors
Many common smoke detectors emit radiation.

Fluorescent Lights Emit Radiation
Fluorescent light bulbs emit radiation.

Irradiated Gemstones
Some gemstones are radioactive, either naturally or from a treatment.

Radioactive Ceramics
Some ceramics and glasses are radioactive.

10 Radioactive Everyday Products
You are exposed to radioactivity every day, often from the foods you eat and the products you use. Here is a look at some common everyday products and foods that are radioactive.

Bubble Science Projects and Experiment Ideas
It's fun to play with bubbles! You can do much more with bubbles than simply blow a few here and there. Here's a list of fun science projects and experiments involving bubbles.

What Chemical Turns Fire Green?
This is a list of 10 chemicals that produce green flames. Learn what chemicals to use and how to make sure the green color isn't ruined by other compounds.

Amethyst Specimen
This is an example of an amethyst found in NC. Page 6.

Blue Gem from North Carolina
This blue gem was included in a seeded bucket at Emerald Hollow Mine. Page 10.

Bunch of Beryls from North Carolina
This is an assortment of beryls from the Emerald Hollow Mine. Page 21.

Creeking for Gems
Creeking is what you call the act of looking for gems in a creek or stream. Page 3.

Emerald Crystals from Emerald Hollow Mine
These are typical emeralds from the Emerald Hollow Mine. Page 19.

Green Gem from North Carolina
Emerald? Aventurine? Emerald crystals tend to be associated with white and black minerals (matrix). The beryls I saw ranged from pale green to deep vivid emerald green. If you don't find any emeralds on your own, you can purchase an inexpensive 'beryl bucket' with is sure to contain some gems. Beryls include aquamarines (blue), though I did not see any. Page 7.

Garnet from Emerald Hollow Mine
Garnet comes in red as well as other colors. Page 14.

Gemstone Point from North Carolina
Some samples at the mine included points, which retain their crystal structure. Page 9.

Hiddenite Mineral Sample
This is a sample of hiddenite from Hiddenite, NC. Page 4.

Jasper from Emerald Hollow Mine
Jasper comes in many colors. Chemistry. Page 18.

Mica from Emerald Hollow Mine
Mica is a common silicate mineral. Page 17.

Monazite from Emerald Hollow Mine
Monazite is a rare mineral that may be radioactive. Page 16.

Quartz with Rutile
This is an example of a specimen of quartz containing rutile. Page 11.

Rough Ruby from North Carolina
Rough ruby is a heavy stone. Chemistry. Page 12.

Ruby Specimen
This is an example of a ruby from the Emerald Hollow Mine. Page 5.

Ruby from the Emerald Hollow Mine
Ruby and sapphire are often found together. The Emerald Hollow Mine is a good source of both gems. Page 15.

Sapphire from North Carolina
Sapphire is a heavy gemstone. Chemistry. Page 13.

Sluicing at Emerald Hollow Mine
Here is what sluicing at a mine looks like. it's dirty work, but fun. Page 2.

Sluicing Through the Mud
This is a basic sluicing set-up for gemstone mining,

Small Emeralds from Emerald Hollow Mine
Small emeralds like this are common in this part of North Carolina. Page 20.

Sodalite from Emerald Hollow
Sodalite like this probably was added to the bucket to miners would leave with pretty stones. Page 8.

Argon - Noble Gas
Argon is the current carrier in this discharge tube. Page 5.

Radon Gas
Radon would glow red in a gas discharge tube. Page 10.

Xenon
Xenon is a colorless gas that emits a blue glow is a discharge tube. Page 9.

Krypton - Noble Gas
Krypton in a discharge tube displays its green and orange spectral signature. Page 8.

Argon Glow in a Discharge Tube - Noble Gas
This is the purple glow of argon in a gas discharge tube. Page 7.

Argon Ice
This is a piece of argon ice. A drop of liquid argon is melting on the argon ice. Page 6.

Hiddenite Gems - Emerald Hollow Mine
The Emerald Hollow Mine in Hiddenite, NC is the only emerald mine in the United States open to the public for prospecting. I went to North Carolina to check the mine out for myself. Can you find emeralds? Yes! And rubies, sapphires, amethyst, citrine, the rare gemstone hiddenite, and much more.

Olivine from Hawaii's Green Sand Beach
This is a close up of a sample of olivine from Hawaii's green sand beach. Page 14.

Waikoloa Beach in Hawaii
This is a photo of Waikoloa Beach on the island of Hawaii. Page 4.

Waikoloa Coral Sample
This is a sample of coral from Waikoloa Beach. Page 5.

White Sand at Waikoloa Beach, Hawaii
This is a close up photo of the sand at Waikoloa Beach, Hawaii. Page 6.

Helium - Glowing Helium in a Tube
This is a glowing vial of ionized helium in a gas discharge tube. Page 2.

Neon - Noble Gas
This discharge tube displays neon's characteristic reddish-orange emission. Page 3.

Neon Discharge Tube - Noble Gas
This is a photo of a glowing discharge tube filled with ionized neon. Page 4.

Helium - Noble Gas
This is a photo of helium filled discharge tube shaped like the element's atomic symbol.

Kilauea Overlooking the Pacific in Hawaii
Kilauea Overlooking the Pacific. Chemistry. Page 16.

Tree Ferns at Kilauea on Hawaii
These are giant tree ferns near Kilauea volcano on Hawaii. Page 18.

Royal Kona Resort Beach
This is the beach at the Royal Kona Resort.

Volcanic Fumes Warning at Volcanoes National Park
This is a volcanic fumes warning sign at Volcanoes National Park. Page 17.

Waipio Overlook
Waipio Overlook. Chemistry. Page 10.

White Sand from Hawaii
This is a sample of white sand from a Hawaiian beach. Page 3.

Waipio Wild Horse on the Big Island
This is a baby wild horse on the island of Hawaii. Page 11.

Black Sand Beach on the Big Island
Black Sand Beach. Chemistry. Page 7.

Green Sand Beach Trail at the South End of the Big Island
This is part of the trail you walk to get to the Green Sand Beach on the island of Hawaii. Page 12.

Green Sand from a Volcano
This is a sample of green sand from the island of Hawaii. Page 13.

Hawaiian 'White' Sand Beach
This is an example of a white sand beach on the island of Hawaii. Page 2.

Kilauea Lava Flow on Hawaii
This is a photo of a lava flow from Kilauea on Hawaii. Page 15.

Sea Turtle at Black Sand Beach
Sea Turtle at Black Sand Beach. Chemistry. Page 9.

Black Sand
Black sand from Punaluu's beach park on the island of Hawaii. Page 8.

Hawaii Chemistry
Take a look at the Big Island of Hawaii, Kona, from a chemistry perspective.

Basic Color Printable Periodic Table
Get the PDF file of this essential color periodic table printable. Page 7.

Basic Printable Periodic Table
This is a basic black periodic table you can print to use for chemistry work. Page 8.

Blank Periodic Table
Fill in the boxes of this blank periodic table. Page 3.

Periodic Table of the Elements with Boiling Points
This color printable periodic table indicates each element's symbol, atomic number, and boiling point. Page 13.

Color Printable Periodic Table of the Elements
This is a colored periodic table of elements to print, containing all essential information. Page 10.

Color Printable Periodic Table of the Elements
This is a free color periodic table printable you can download and use. Page 4.

Electron Configuration Printable Periodic Table
Use the electron configuration periodic table to look up element electron shells. Page 9.

Color Printable Periodic Table of the Elements - Abundance of Elements in Earth's Crust
This color printable periodic table lists the element abundance in the earth's crust. Page 17.

Periodic Table of the Elements - Melting Points
This color printable periodic table indicates each element's symbol, atomic number, and melting point. Page 12.

Color Printable Periodic Table of the Elements - Abundance of Elements in Seawater
Color Printable Periodic Table of the Elements - Abundance of Elements in Seawater. Page 18.

Printable Periodic Table Black/White HD
This is a high def black and white periodic table of the elements that you can save or print. Page 6.

Printable Periodic Table of the Elements
This is a basic black and white HD periodic table to print, Page 5.

Tabla Periódica de los Elementos
This color printable periodic table of the elements includes the element name, atomic number, symbol, and atomic weight. The colors denote the element groups. (Esta tabla de colores para imprimir periódicos de los elementos que incluye el nombre del elemento, número atómico, símbolo, y el peso atómico. Los colores indican los grupos de elementos.). Page 19.

Valence Periodic Table
This color printable periodic table indicates each element's symbol, atomic number, name and maximum valence. Page 16.

Water - Classic Alchemy Symbol
This is the classic alchemy symbol for water. Page 94.

Alchemical Symbols in 1775
This is a record of the alchemy symbols in use in the year 1775. Page 104.

Astrological Symbols in Alchemy
This is a collection of astrological symbols found in alchemy texts. Page 103.

Elegant Tin Alchemy Symbol
This is one of the

Common Zinc Alchemy Symbol
This is one of the common alchemy symbols for the element zinc, often denoted by the letter Z. Page 99.

Elegant Gold Alchemy Symbol
Here is one of the alchemy symbols for the element gold. Page 38.

Alchemy Symbols
See the alchemical symbols for the chemical elements.

Alchemy Symbols
See the alchemical symbols for the chemical elements.

Converting Pounds Per Square Inch or PSI to Millibars - Pressure Unit Conversion Problem
This example problem demonstrates how to convert the pressure unit pounds per square inch (psi) to millibars (mb).

Limiting Reactant-Theoretical Yield Worked Chemistry Problems
This worked chemistry example problem demonstrates how to solve the limiting reactant and theoretical yield of a reaction in an aqueous solution.

Converting Celsius to Kelvin - Worked Temperature Unit Conversion Example
This example problem illustrates the method to convert temperatures from Celsius to Kelvin.

Non-Newtonian Fluid Definition
This is the definition of a non-Newtonian fluid, with examples.

Snowflake Chemistry (Common Snowflake Questions)
Here are answers to common questions about snowflakes. Learn how snow forms, what shapes snowflakes take, why snow crystals are symmetrical, whether no two snowflakes really are alike, and why snow looks white.

How To Grow Black Crystals
You can grow crystals in any color - even black! This crystal growing recipe produces black crystals. You can make them solid black, like black diamonds, or translucent black, like smoky quartz.

Vibrational Bond - New Type of Chemical Bonding
Chemists verified the existence of a new type of chemical bond called the vibrational bond. Here is a look at how the bond works and some of its properties.

What Is Uranium Glass or Vaseline Glass?
Uranium glass or Vaseline glass fluoresces with a characteristic green light under ultraviolet or black light. Uranium glass Here's a look at what uranium glass is and how it is used.

Why Cold Weather Makes You Pee
Have you ever noticed you need to pee more when you're cold or it's cold outside? Here's how your body's chemistry increases urination when the temperature drops.

Haircolor Changes After You Die
If you've ever seen a mummy in a museum, you might have thought the ancients went a little overboard with henna and other red dyes. Actually, haircolor changes after you are dead. Here's why.

Simple Candy Osmosis Experiment
Use gummy bears to demonstrate osmosis with this simple science experiment.

Ten Facts About the Element Iodine
Iodine is an element you encounter in iodized salt and the foods you eat. A small amount of iodine is essential for nutrition. Here are 10 facts about iodine.

Turn Water into Liquid Gold - Alchemy Project
Mix two clear solutions, wait, and watch the liquid turn to gold! This is a simple alchemy project or chemistry demonstration, based on early attempts to make gold from base metals.

Sulfuric Acid and Sugar - Chemistry Demonstration
Ordinary table sugar and sulfuric acid react to produce a growing black column. This demonstration is an example of an exothermic reaction and a dehydration reaction. It is good for discussions about the nature of carbohydrates, hydrogen bonds, and carbon properties.

How to Do the Barking Dog Chemistry Demonstration
The Barking Dog chemistry demonstration is based on an exothermic reaction between nitrous oxide and carbon disulfide. Ignition of the mixture results in a bright blue chemiluminescent flash, accompanied by a characteristic 'bark' or 'woof' sound.

Color Change Liquid Thermometer
This color change chemistry project produces a liquid that oscillates between pink and blue according to temperature.

What Is the Difference Between Osmosis and Diffusion?
Osmosis and diffusion both are transport processes, but the two terms don't mean exactly the same thing. Here's the explanation for the difference between osmosis and diffusion.

Active and Passive Transport
Compare and contrast active and passive transport processes.

Actinium Facts
Get periodic table facts on the chemical and physical properties of the element actinium.

What Is Road Salt?
Road salt is used to melt snow and ice and keep water from freezing. Here is an explanation of what road salt is made of and how it works.

Salt Crystal Garden
A salt crystal garden produces a tree of white or colored crystals. Learn how to grow a salt crystal garden using a paper towel or toilet paper tube and a salt crystal solution.

How Chemical Hair Removal Works
Have you ever wondered how chemical hair removal (a chemical depilatory) works? Here's the chemistry of the process.

Difference Between Celsius and Centigrade
Learn the difference between Celsius and centrigrade temperature scales.

Chemical Properties
Here is an explanation of what chemical properties are, plus several examples of chemical properties of matter.

How to Make Antibubbles
Learn what antibubbles are and how to observe antibubbles and make them yourself.

What Is Alum? - Alum Facts, Types, Uses, and More
Find out what alum is and the uses of alum.

Chemical Equilibrium
Learn about the basics of chemical equilibrium, including how to write the expression for chemical equilibrium.

What Is Reverse Osmosis and How Does It Work?
Learn about reverse osmosis and find out how it is used to purify water.

Nucleic Acid Quick Facts
If you're taking general chemistry, organic, or biochemistry, you'll need to understand some basic concepts about nucleic acids, the polymers used to code the genetic information of organisms. Here are some quick nucleic acid facts to get you started.

Caffeine and Other Stimulants That Cause Psychosis
While you may know Adderall and other amphetamines can cause psychosis, did you know coffee and other foods that contain caffeine can make you mental, too?

How To Melt Gallium Metal in Your Hand
Gallium is a metal you can melt in the palm of your hand from solid into liquid form. Here's how to do the project safely.

Ionic Compound Properties
Here are the properties shared by the ionic compounds.

Qualitative Versus Quantitative Data
Learn what qualitative and quantitative data are, the difference between them, and get examples of each type of data.

Grow Sheet Crystals - Quick Crystal Growing Project
If you don't have the time or patience to grow crystals over hours, days, or longer, try growing these sheet crystals. You'll get results almost instantly!

Salt Crystal Rings and Ferns - Quick and Easy Salt Crystal Growing Project
This is one of the quickest and easiest crystal growing projects there is! All you need is a bit of salt, water, a steel pan, and a stove to produce salt crystal rings, ferns, and other shapes.

How To Balance Ionic Equations
These are the steps to write a balanced net ionic equation. You'll learn how to balance any equation for mass and charge, plus there are examples.

5 Types Energy and Examples
Energy comes in various forms. Here are 5 main types of energy and examples of them.

Ricin and RCA - Castor Bean Toxin Information
Get information about the castor bean toxins ricin and RCA, including how they work and how poisoning can be treated.

How Neon Lights Work
You've seen bright red neon signs and other colors of lights, but do you understand how they work? Here's a simple explanation of how neon lights work.

Neon Facts and Neon Properties
Learn about the element neon. Get neon facts and find projects and quizzes relating to neon.

Egg in a Bottle Demonstration
You don't see air and might not think much of it is contained in a bottle, but air and the pressure it exerts can be very powerful. The egg in a bottle demonstration illustrates the concept of air pressure.

August 9 Science History
Learn about the history of science by reading about the significant scientific events that took place on August 9 in history.

August 20 Science History
Learn about the history of science by reading about the significant scientific events that took place on August 20 in history.

Explosions: Deflagration Versus Detonation
A deflagration and a detonation are both explosions, but the two terms don't mean the same thing. Here is an explanation of the difference, with examples.

What Does the Moon Smell Like?
Have you ever wondered what the Moon would smell like? Astronauts describe a characteristic scent to the Moon rock and dust. Can you guess what it was?

10 Platinum Facts
Platinum is a beautiful white metal used in jewelry, alloys, and electronics. Here are 10 interesting facts about platinum.

What Is the Best Deicer?
Proper use of a chemical deicer can ease your battle with snow and ice. Here is a look at effective chemicals you can use.

Use Pop Rocks To Make a Volcano (No Baking Soda or Vinegar)
You can make a chemical volcano even if you don't have any baking soda or vinegar. Here's a recipe for an easy Pop Rocks homemade volcano.

Why Is Molality Used Instead of Molarity?
Learn why molality is used instead of molarity for concentration and when you use one instead of the other.

How To Make Smoke Come out of a Volcano
Do you want to add a touch of realism to your homemade volcano? It's easy to make it smoke. Here's what you do.

Science Fair Projects - What They Are, How To Do Them
You may have to do a science fair project or help with one, but be unclear what exactly one is. This introduction to them should help clear up any confusion.

List of All Elements Considered to Be Metals
Most elements are metals. This group includes the alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, transition metals, basic metals, and rare earth elements.

How To Make a Rainbow Rose
A rainbow rose is a real rose with petals all the colors of the rainbow. Find out how a rainbow rose works and how to make one yourself.

3 Ways To Make a Saturated Solution
It's easy to make a saturated solution for chemistry lab or growing crystals. Here's a look at what a saturated solution is and how to prepare one.

Crystal Science Fair Projects - Tips and Ideas
Crystals can make interesting and fun science fair projects. Here's a look at some tips and ideas for science fair projects for crystals and crystal growing.

Does Heavy Water Ice Sink or Float?
Learn whether heavy water ice cubes sink or float and get the explanation for the answer.

Philosopher's Stone - Squared Circle Alchemy Symbol
Philosopher's Stone - Squared Circle Alchemy Symbol. Page 62.

Scheele's Alchemical Symbols
This is a collection of Scheele's Alchemical Symbols. Carl Wilhelm Scheele was a German-Swedish chemist who discovered several elements. Page 102.

Egyptian Symbols for the Metals
This is a collection of ancient Egyptian alchemy symbols used for metals. Page 101.

Sulfur Alchemy Symbol #2
This is one of the versions of the alchemy symbol for the nonmetal sulfur. Page 86.

Common Sulfur Alchemy Symbol
This is a common or popular sulfur alchemy symbol. Page 88.

Alchemy Symbol for Tin
Tin had several alchemy symbols or glyphs. Page 92.

Tin Alchemy Symbol Variant
This is one of the alchemy symbols for the element tin. Page 93.

Tin Alchemy Symbol Version
This is another version of a tin alchemy symbol. Page 91.

Zinc Alchemy Symbol #3
Zinc was a common metal. Here is one of it's alchemy symbols. Page 97.

Zinc Alchemy Symbol #2
This is another common zinc alchemy symbol. Page 98.

Alchemical Symbol for Zinc
This is an alchemical symbol for the metal zinc. Page 96.

Alchemy Symbol for the Element Silver
This alchemy symbol represents the element silver. Page 78.

Old Silver Alchemy Symbol
This is one of the silver alchemy symbols found in old texts. Page 79.

Silver Alchemy Symbol Variation
This is a variation of the alchemy symbol for silver. Page 73.

Silver Alchemy Glyph
This is an alchemy glyph or symbol for silver. Page 77.

Ancient Silver Alchemy Symbol
This is one of the ancient alchemy symbols for silver. Page 76.

Silver Alchemy Symbol or Glyph
This is an alchemy symbol or glyph for silver. Page 75.

Sulfur Alchemy Symbol #6
This alchemy symbol for sulfur came from old alchemy texts. Page 87.

Sulfur Alchemy Symbol #5
Sulfur was one of the best known elements to the alchemists. Several symbols were used. Page 84.

Sulfur Alchemy Symbol #4
Here is an alchemy symbol for sulfur or brimstone. Page 83.

Sulfur Alchemy Symbol #3
There are several alchemy symbols for brimstone or sulfur. Page 89.

Sulfur Alchemical Symbol
Here is an alchemical symbol for the element sulfur. Page 85.

Sulfur Alchemy Symbol - Variation
This is a variation of the common alchemy symbol for sulfur. Each alchemist had his own special version of the common symbols. Page 82.

Mercury - Old Alchemy Symbol
Mercury was prized by ancient alchemists. Here is one alchemy symbol for the element. Page 57.

Mercury Alchemy Glyph
This is an alchemy glyph for the metallic element mercury. Page 59.

Mercury or Quicksilver Alchemy Symbol
This is a glyph or alchemy symbol for mercury or quicksilver. Page 61.

Old Mercury Alchemy Symbol
There were several alchemy symbols for mercury or quicksilver. Page 56.

Mercury Element Alchemy Symbol
Here is an alchemy symbol for the element mercury. Page 60.

Mercury Alchemy Symbol Variation
This is one of the variations of the alchemy symbol for mercury. Page 58.

Phosphorus Alchemy Symbol
This is one of the alchemy symbols for phosphorus. Page 64.

Old Phosphorus Alchemy Symbol
Here is an old alchemy symbol for the element phosphorus. Page 65.

Platinum Alchemy Symbol
This is an alchemy symbol for the metal platinum. Page 67.

Potassium Alchemy Symbol
This is an ancient alchemy symbol for potassium. Page 69.

Ancient Potassium Alchemy Symbol
This is one of the ancient alchemy symbols for potassium. Page 70.

Silver - Old Alchemy Symbol
Here is one of the old alchemy symbols for silver, a metal. Page 74.

Lead Alchemy Symbol
This is an alchemy symbol for the dense metal lead. Page 44.

Classic Lead Alchemy Symbol
Here is one of the classic alchemy symbols for the metal lead. Page 49.

Lead Alchemy Symbol or Glyph
Here is one of the alchemy symbols or glyphs for lead, a metal known to ancient man. Page 47.

Lead - Ancient Alchemy Symbol
Here is an ancient alchemy symbol or glyph for the element lead. Page 48.

Lead - An Old Alchemy Symbol
This is one of the oldest known alchemy symbols for lead, a metal. Page 45.

Magnesium Alchemy Glyph
This is a glyph or alchemy symbol for magnesium. Page 51.

Old Magnesium Alchemy Symbol
Here is an old alchemy symbol for the metal magnesium. Page 52.

Magnesium Alchemy Symbol
This is one of the alchemy symbols for the element magnesium. Page 53.

Alchemy Symbol for Magnesium
Here is one of the old alchemy symbols for the metal magnesium. Page 54.

Alchemy Symbol for the Metal Gold
Gold was known to man since ancient time. Here is an alchemy symbol for the metal. Page 33.

Classic Gold Alchemy Symbol
Here is a classic symbol used in alchemy to represent gold. Page 30.

Gold Alchemy Glyph
This is a glyph or alchemy symbol for gold, a metal known to the ancients. Page 29.

Gold Alchemy Symbol or Glyph
Here is a representative glyph or alchemy symbol for the metal gold. Page 34.

Learn the Alchemy Symbol for Gold
Here is one of the classic alchemy symbols for gold. Page 24.

Alchemy Symbols - Gold or Aurum
Gold or aurum is one of the metals known to alchemists. Here is the symbol for gold. Page 25.

Alchemical Symbol - Gold
Here is an alchemical symbol for the metallic element, gold. Page 32.

Classic Iron Alchemy Symbol
Alchemists knew about iron. Here is the alchemy symbol for the element. Page 41.

Iron Alchemy Symbol
This is an alchemy symbol for iron. Page 40.

Ancient Iron Alchemy Symbol
Iron Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 42.

Old Lead Alchemy Symbol
This is one of the old alchemy symbols for lead. Page 46.

Copper Alchemy Symbol Variation
Copper Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 17.

Alchemical Symbol for Copper
Copper Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 18.

Copper Element Alchemy Symbol
Copper Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 19.

Copper - Ancient Alchemy Symbol
Copper Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 20.

Copper Alchemy Symbol
Copper Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 16.

Gold - Old Alchemy Symbol
There were many alchemy symbols for gold. Here is an example. Page 28.

Arcane Gold Alchemy Symbol
Alchemy predates chemistry. Here is an old symbol used by alchemists for the metal gold. Page 31.

Gold Glyph or Alchemy Symbol
Here is the glyph for gold or its alchemy symbol. Page 26.

Alchemy Symbol for the Element Gold
Some elements were known to alchemists, including gold. Here is its alchemy symbol. Page 37.

One Alchemy Symbol for Gold
This is one of the numerous alchemy symbols used to signify gold. Page 27.

Typical Gold Alchemy Symbol
Many symbols were used for gold. Here is a typical alchemy symbol for the element. Page 36.

Arsenic - Alchemy Symbol
Arsenic - Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 7.

Arsenic - Alchemy Symbol #3
Arsenic - Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 9.

Arsenic - Alchemy Symbol
Arsenic - Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 10.

Arsenic - Alchemy Symbol #4
Arsenic - Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 11.

Arsenic - Alchemy Symbol #5
Arsenic - Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 12.

Arsenic - Alchemy Symbol #2
Arsenic - Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 8.

Bismuth Alchemy Symbol
Bismuth Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 14.

Earth - Alchemy Symbol
Earth - Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 21.

Salt - Alchemy Symbol
Salt - Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 71.

Sulfur Alchemy Symbol
Sulfur Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 81.

Air - Alchemy Symbol
Air was considered to be one of the four classical elements in alchemy, together with earth, water, and fire.

Alchemy Symbol for Antimony
This is an alchemy symbol or glyph for the element antimony. Page 2.

Antimony - Alchemy Symbol #1
This is one of several possible alchemy symbols for antimony. Page 4.

Antimony - Alchemy Symbol #2
Experimenters often used unique alchemy symbols for elements. Here is one of the symbols for antimony. Page 3.

Antimony - Alchemy Symbol
Antimony - Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 5.

Arsenic - Alchemical Symbol
Chemistry. Page 6.

Bismuth - Alchemical Symbol
Chemistry. Page 13.

Copper - Alchemical Symbol
Chemistry. Page 15.

Fire - Alchemy Symbol
Fire - Alchemy Symbol. Chemistry. Page 22.

Platinum - Alchemical Symbol
Chemistry. Page 66.

Silver - Alchemical Symbol
Chemistry. Page 72.

Gold - Alchemical Symbol
Chemistry. Page 23.

Element Symbols - Alchemy Gold Glyph
Early symbols for the elements were alchemy symbols. Here is the glyph for gold. Page 35.

Iron - Alchemical Symbol
Chemistry. Page 39.

Lead - Alchemical Symbol
Chemistry. Page 43.

Magnesium - Alchemical Symbol
Chemistry. Page 50.

Mercury - Alchemical Symbol
Chemistry. Page 55.

Phosphorus - Alchemical Symbol
Chemistry. Page 63.

Potassium - Alchemical Symbol
Chemistry. Page 68.

Sulfur - Alchemical Symbol
Chemistry. Page 80.

Tin - Alchemical Symbol
Chemistry. Page 90.

Zinc - Alchemical Symbol
Chemistry. Page 95.

Alchemy Symbols
See the alchemical symbols for the chemical elements.

Alchemy Symbols
See the alchemical symbols for the chemical elements.

Alchemy Symbols
See the alchemical symbols for the chemical elements.

Alchemy Symbols
See the alchemical symbols for the chemical elements.

Alchemy Symbols
See the alchemical symbols for the chemical elements.

Alchemy Symbols
See the alchemical symbols for the chemical elements.

Melting Snow & Ice with Salt
If you live someplace cold, you have experienced salt on sidewalks and roads. Have you ever wondered why? Here's how salt melts ice and snow.

Blog


How To Extract Caffeine from Tea
Use this procedure to extract and purify caffeine from tea leaves.

What Is the pH of Lemon Juice?
Lemons are acidic fruits. Here is a look at exactly what the pH of lemon juice is and whether it can affect the pH of your body.

Candy Glass Icicle Decorations
Make candy glass icicle decorations and learn about sugar chemistry.

Ideal Gas Example Problem - Constant Temperature
Here is an example of an ideal gas problem where the temperature of the gas is held constant.

Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac (1778 - 1850)
Gay-Lussac was a French chemist and physicist known his work with gases and the composition of the atmosphere. Here is a biography of this scientist.

Why Isn't Water on the Periodic Table?
You won't find water on the periodic table of the elements. Here is the explanation why water isn't considered to be an element.

Why Are Noble Gases Called Noble?
The last column of elements in the periodic table are the noble gases. Here is the explanation why they are called noble.

Introduction to Potato Clock Chemistry Experiment
A potato can function as an electrochemical cell or battery. It's fun to use a potato to power an LED clock.

Materials for a Potato Clock
A potato can function as an electrochemical cell or battery. It's fun to use a potato to power an LED clock.

How to Make a Potato Battery to Power a LED Clock
A potato can function as an electrochemical cell or battery. It's fun to use a potato to power an LED clock.

Potato Battery - More Fun Things to Try
A potato can function as an electrochemical cell or battery. It's fun to use a potato to power an LED clock.

Crystal Snowflake Ornaments - Make Crystal Paper Snowflakes
Make your own crystal snowflake ornaments by crystallizing borax onto homemade paper snowflakes. These sparkling snowflakes can be made in any size to suit your decorating needs.

Endergonic vs Exergonic Reactions (and Examples)
Learn about the difference between endergonic and exergonic reactions and processes and get examples of each type of reaction.

How to Make Yogurt - Homemade Recipe
Yogurt is made by fermenting milk. Here's how to make yogurt and a look at the chemistry of yogurt.

Lewis Dot Structure Example - Octet Rule Exception
Lewis dot structures help predict molecular geometry. This example problem shows the steps to draw a structure where an atom violates the octet rule.

Science Fair Project Poster Image Example
This is an example of how you can organize a science fair project poster to clearly display your use of the scientific method for your science fair project.

Fun Holiday Science Projects
Are you looking for another source of fun for the winter holidays? Why not add some educational science projects with a winter holiday theme? These seasonal activities and experiments will entertain you, plus you may learn something too.

How Do Smoke Detectors Work?
Learn how smoke detectors work and which type of detector is better.

Predicting Formulas of Compounds With Polyatomic Ions
This example problem demonstrates how to predict the molecular formulas of several compounds involving polyatomic ions.

Avogadro's Number - Example Chemistry Problem
Avogadro's number is the number of atoms or molecules in a mole. Here is an example of using this number to determine the number of molecules contained in a known mass of molecules.

Law of Multiple Proportions Problem
This is a worked example chemistry problem using the Law of Multiple Proportions.

Limiting Reactant & Theoretical Yield (Worked Problem)
This worked example chemistry problem shows how to determine the limiting reactant of a chemical reaction and calculate the theoretical yield.

Determine Concentration and Molarity
This is a worked example showing the steps necessary to find the concentration of a solution when given the amount of solute.

Concentration and Molarity Worked Example Problem
This is a worked example showing the steps necessary to create a stock solution of predetermined concentration.

Mole Relations in Balanced Equations Example Problems
These are worked chemistry problems showing how to calculate the number of moles of reactants or products in a balanced chemical equation.

Percent Composition by Mass - Worked Chemistry Problems
This is a worked example problem showing the steps necessary to calculate percent composition by mass of a solution.

Fact Sheet About Poisoning From Ricin Toxin
Ricin is a potent toxin extracted from castor beans (Ricinus communis). There is a lot of fear and misinformation associated with this poison. The purpose of this fact sheet is to help separate fact from fiction regarding ricin poisoning.

What Freezing Point Depression Is and How It Works
Freezing point is one of the colligative properties of matter. Here's a look at what freezing point depression is and how it works.

10th Grade Science Fair Projects Ideas
Find an idea for a 10th grade science fair project or a science project targeted at the high school education level.

How to Make Natural Toothpaste Guide
Make your own natural toothpaste using these easy instructions.

Worked Chemistry Problems
The best way to learn chemistry is to practice working problems, but it helps to see how each type of problem is solved. Follow examples of worked chemistry problems. These chemistry problems are arranged alphabetically according to subject. Multiple worked examples are given for several types of problems.

Worked Chemistry Problems
The best way to learn chemistry is to practice working problems, but it helps to see how each type of problem is solved. Follow examples of worked chemistry problems. These chemistry problems are arranged alphabetically according to subject. Multiple worked examples are given for several types of problems.

Worked Chemistry Problems
The best way to learn chemistry is to practice working problems, but it helps to see how each type of problem is solved. Follow examples of worked chemistry problems. These chemistry problems are arranged alphabetically according to subject. Multiple worked examples are given for several types of problems.

Worked Chemistry Problems
The best way to learn chemistry is to practice working problems, but it helps to see how each type of problem is solved. Follow examples of worked chemistry problems. These chemistry problems are arranged alphabetically according to subject. Multiple worked examples are given for several types of problems.

Worked Chemistry Problems
The best way to learn chemistry is to practice working problems, but it helps to see how each type of problem is solved. Follow examples of worked chemistry problems. These chemistry problems are arranged alphabetically according to subject. Multiple worked examples are given for several types of problems.

Dalton's Law of Partial Pressures - Worked Problem
Dalton's Law of Partial Pressures, or Dalton's Law, states that the total pressure of a gas in a container is the sum of the partial pressures of the individual gases in the container. Here is a worked example problem showing how to use Dalton's Law to calculate the pressure of a gas.

Enthalpy Change of a Reaction - Example Problem
Worked Example Chemistry Problems - See how to determine the change in enthalpy of a reaction using Hess's Laws.

Raoult's Law Example Problem - Vapor Pressure Change
This example problem demonstrates how to use Raoult's Law to calculate the change in vapor pressure by adding a strong electrolyte to a solvent.

Raoult's Law Example Problem - Vapor Pressure Calculation
This example problem demonstrates how to use Raoult's Law to calculate the of vapor pressure of two volatile solutions mixed together.

Ideal Gas vs. Non-ideal Gas Example Problem
This example problem demonstrates how to calculate the pressure of a gas system using the ideal gas law and the van der Waal's equation. It also demonstrates the difference between an ideal gas and a non-ideal gas.

What Is a Controlled Experiment? - Definition and Example
One of the most common types of experiment is a controlled experiment. Here is a look at what a controlled experiment is and why this type of experiment is so popular.

Oxidation and Reduction Reaction Example Problem
In an oxidation-reduction or redox reaction, it is often confusing to identify which molecule is oxidized in the reaction and which molecule is reduced. This example problem shows how to correctly identify which atoms undergo oxidation or reduction and their corresponding redox agents.

What Is Collagen?
Collagen is a protein made up of amino acids that is found in the human body. Here's a look at what collagen is and how it is used in the body.

How Do Lightsticks Work? Glowstick Chemistry
Learn how a lightstick or glowstick works. Get information about cyalume and chemiluminescence.

Slime You Can Eat - Recipes and Links
Nearly all of the slime recipes are non-toxic, but that doesn't mean the ingredients or slime are good enough to eat. This is a collection of edible slime recipes. Some edible slime tastes good; some edible slime tastes terrible. All of these recipes are safe to eat as food.

How To Name Simple Alkane Chains
Simple alkane chains are named after the number of carbon atoms in the molecule. It is a good idea to commit the names of the simple alkane chains to memory.

List of Periodic Table Groups
These are the element groups found in the periodic table of the elements. There are links to lists of elements within each group.

What is Gorilla Glass?
Gorilla Glass is the thin, tough glass that protects cell phones and laptops. Here's a look at what Gorilla Glass is and what makes it so strong.

How to Grow Epsom Salt Crystals
Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) crystals are beautiful clear crystals that are quick and easy to grow. This is a simple procedure to make your own magnesium sulfate crystals.

Avogadro's Law Example Problem - Chemistry Problems
Avogadro's gas law states the volume of a gas is proportional to the number of moles of gas present when temperature and pressure are held constant. This example problem demonstrates how to use Avogadro's law to determine the volume of a gas when more gas is added to the system.

Nickel Element - Facts and Properties
Get periodic table facts on the chemical and physical properties of the element nickel.

Equilibrium Constant at Chemical Equilibrium
The equilibrium constant is calculated from the expression for chemical equilibrium. Learn what the equilibrium constant, how to calculate the equilibrium constant and what it means if the equilibrium constant is very large or very small.

Carbon Family - Element Group 14
Learn about the characteristics and properties of element group 14 of the periodic table, the carbon family.

What Is the Most Expensive Element?
Here is a look at the most expensive natural element and the most expensive of any element known to exist.

Learn About the Drug Called Bath Salts
Learn about the chemical composition of bath salts. Additional facts are provided about the class of drugs called bath salts.

How to Grow a Cup of Quick Crystal Needles
Grow a cupful of epsom salt crystal needles in your refrigerator. It's quick, easy, and safe.

Mentos & Diet Soda Chemical Volcano
Add mentos candies to diet soda to create an amazing chemical eruption.

Science Lab Report Template - Fill in the Blanks
If you are preparing a lab report, it may help to have a template to work from. This science lab report template allows you to fill in the blanks, making the write-up easier.

Solubility Rules for Inorganic Compounds
These are the general solubility rules for inorganic compounds, primarily inorganic salts. Use the solubility rules to determine whether a compound will dissolve or precipitate.

Briggs-Rauscher Oscillating Color Change Reaction
These are instructions for performing the Briggs-Rauscher Color Change Reaction or the Oscillating Clock Demonstration.

Hydrogen Bond - Chemistry Glossary Definition
Hydrogen Bond definition, as used in chemistry, chemical engineering, and physics.

High School Science Experiment Ideas
Get ideas for science experiments targeted at the high school educational level. Find out how to perform a science experiment and get a hypothesis to test.

Bending Water with Static Electricity
Use static electricity to bend a stream of flowing water. This is an easy science activity that illustrates how opposite electrical charges attract each other.

Does Nicotine Aid With Weight Loss?
Nicotine is a stimulant, so you might think it helps with weight loss. Here's what you need to know.

Can You Really Run Your Car on Water?
You can make a fuel from water that can be used to power a car. Here's what you need to know.

Reactions in Water or Aqueous Solution
Learn the basic principles for writing balanced equations and performing calculations for reactions in water or aqueous solution.

Molecular Geometry Introduction
Molecular geometry is the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms within a molecule. It is important to be able to predict and understand molecular structure because many of the properties of a substance are determined by its geometry.

How to Get Fluoride Out of Water
Don't want fluoride in your water? Here's how you can (and can't) remove it.

Tattoos, Red Ink, and Sensitivity Reactions
Learn about the relationship between red tattoo ink and sensitivity reactions.

How to Make Moonshine
Learn how a home still can be used to distill moonshine or grain alcohol.

Mercury Fulminate and Crystal Meth in 'Breaking Bad'
Episode 6 of AMC's 'Breaking Bad' has a scene where our hero, Walt, passes a plastic bag of mercury fulminate off as crystal meth. Why mercury fulminate? I

What Is Litmus Paper?
Litmus paper is used to test pH. Here's a look at what exactly litmus paper is and how it's made.

How Much Water Is in the Human Body?
Find out how much water is in the average human body.

Empirical Formula Practice Test Questions
The empirical formula of a compound represents the simplest whole number ratio between the elements that make up the compound. This ten question practice test deals with finding empirical formulas of chemical compounds.

The Chemistry Behind AMC's 'Breaking Bad'
Have you been wondering about the chemistry behind AMC's dramatic television series, Breaking Bad? Here's a look at the science of the show.

Acids, Bases and pH
Learn about acids, bases and pH, including definitions and calculations.

Are Glow Sticks Endothermic or Exothermic?
Glow sticks give off light. Do you know whether they are endothermic or exothermic (or something else)? Here's the answer, from a scientist.

Single Displacement Reaction Definition
This is the definition of single displacement reaction.

IUPAC Atomic Weights of the Elements List
This is the list of the atomic weights of the elements. Elements are listed according to increasing atomic number. The values are those most recently accepted by the IUPAC.

Calculating pH of a Weak Acid - Chemistry Problems
Here is an example of an acid/base problem to calculate the pH of a weak acid solution of known concentration.

How to Balance a Redox Reaction in a Basic Solution
Redox reactions commonly take place in acidic solutions. The could just as easily take place in basic solutions. This example problem shows how to balance a redox reaction in a basic solution.

9th Grade Science Fair Project Ideas
It can be challenging for a 9th grader to come up with an idea for their first high school science fair project. This list may help you with an idea or spark your own creativity for a 9th grade science fair project.

What Is a Toxic Chemical?
You've heard that toxic chemicals are bad for you, but what exactly is a toxic chemical? Here's an explanation of what is meant by the term

How to Write a Science Fair Project Report
Your science fair project may require a lab report or essay. This is a general outline showing how to prepare a report to document your research.

Liquid Nitrogen - Facts, Safety and Uses
Liquid nitrogen is nitrogen that is cold enough to exist in liquid form. It is used for many cooling and cryogenic applications. Here are some liquid nitrogen facts and information about handling liquid nitrogen safely.

Chemistry: Converting Atmospheres to Pascals
This example problem demonstrates how to convert the pressure units atmospheres (atm) to pascals (Pa). Pascal is a SI pressure unit that refers to newtons per square meter. Atmosphere originally was a unit related to the air pressure at sea level. It was later defined as 101325 Pa.

Learn About Dry Ice or Solid Carbon Dioxide
Dry ice is solid carbon dioxide. Here are some facts about dry ice that can help keep you safe when working with it, plus are just fun to know.

Isotopes and Nuclear Symbols - Worked Chemistry Problem
This worked problem demonstrates how to write nuclear symbols for isotopes of a given element.

Predicting Formulas of Ionic Compounds Example Problem
This worked example problem demonstrates how to predict the molecular formulas of ionic compounds.

Avogadro's Number Example Chemistry Problem
Avogadro's number is the number of atoms or molecules in a mole. Here is an example of using this number to determine the mass of a known number of molecules.

Molarity Example Problem
Here is an example of calculating concentration or molarity of a solution.

Theoretical Yield Worked Example Problem
This example problem demonstrates how to calculate the amount of reactant needed to produce a product.

Lewis Structures and Formal Charge - Example Problem
Resonance structures are all the possible Lewis structures for a molecule. Formal charge is a technique to identify which resonance structure is the more correct structure. The most correct Lewis structure will be the structure where the formal charges are evenly distributed throughout the molecule.

Balance Redox Reaction Example Problem
When balancing redox reactions, the overall electronic charge must be balanced in addition to the usual molar ratios of the component reactants and products. This example problem illustrates how to use the half-reaction method to balance a redox reaction in a solution.

What Is Oxidized and Reduced in Oxidation and Reduction Reactions?
In oxidation-reduction or redox reactions, it is important to be able to identify which atoms are being oxidized and which atoms are being reduced. To identify if an atom is either oxidized or reduced, you only have to follow the electrons in the reaction.

Density Example Problem
This example problem shows how to calculate the mass of an object from a known density and volume.

How to Make Snow Yourself Without Mother Nature
If you want snow, but Mother Nature won't cooperate, you can take matters into your own hands and make snow yourself! This is the homemade version of real water ice snow, just like the snow that falls from the sky except without the need for clouds.

Atomic Mass From Atomic Abundance Chemistry Problem
Atomic mass is determined by the weighted average of the masses of naturally-occurring isotopes. Here is an example of how to determine the atomic mass from known atomic abundances.

Mass Relations in Balanced Equations Example Problem
This is a worked example of how to determine the mass of products and reactants used in a balanced chemical reaction.

Boiling Point Elevation Example Problem
This example problem demonstrates how to calculate boiling point elevation.

How to Convert Celsius to Fahrenheit
It is easy to convert Celsius to Fahrenheit with these steps.

Convert Molarity to Parts Per Million Example Problem
This sample problem demonstrates how to convert molarity to parts per million.

Equilibrium Concentration Example Problem
This example problem demonstrates how to calculate the equilibrium concentrations from initial conditions and the reaction's equilibrium constant. This equilibrium constant example concerns a reaction with a

Entropy Change Example Problem and Solution
This example problem demonstrates how to examine the reactants and products to predict the sign of the change in entropy of a reaction. Knowing if the change in entropy should be positive or negative is a useful tool to check your work on problems involving changes in entropy. It is easy to lose a sign during thermochemistry homework problems.

Hess's Law Example Problem - Calculating Enthalpy
This example problem demonstrates strategies and how to use Hess's Law to find the enthalpy change of a reaction using enthalpy data from similar reactions.

Electrochemical Cell EMF Example Problem
The electromotive force, or EMF of a electrochemical cell is the net voltage of the oxidation and reduction half-reactions taking place at the anode and cathode. This example problem shows how to calculate the cell EMF using standard reduction potentials.

Population Standard Deviation Example Calculation
This is a simple example of how to calculate variance and population standard deviation.

3rd Grade Science Fair Project Ideas
Does your 3rd grader need a science fair project idea? Here are a few great ideas for 3rd grade science fair projects. These experiments and topics suitable for grade school level science fair projects.

Chemistry Science Fair Project Ideas
Find ideas for chemistry science fair projects. The experiments and projects are categorized according to topic and age group so you can find the chemistry science fair project that is perfect for you.

Sports-Related Science Fair Project Ideas
Need a science fair project idea and love sports? Why not combine the two and come up with the perfect sports themed science fair project.

Make Ectoplasm Slime for Halloween
You can make this non-sticky, edible slime from two easy-to-find ingredients. It can be used as ectoplasm for Halloween costumes, haunted houses, and Halloween parties.

Boiling Point Elevation Definition and Process
Boiling point elevation occurs when the boiling point of a solution becomes higher than the boiling point of a pure solvent. Here's a closer look at what boiling point elevation is and how it works.

10 Facts About the Periodic Table of Elements
The periodic table organizes the elements according to their periodic properties. Find 10 periodic table facts that are interesting and informative.

What Is Plastic? - Definition in Chemistry
Have you ever wondered about the chemical composition of plastic or what it is made of? Here's a look a what plastic is and how it is formed.

Periodic Table Configuration - Lanthanides and Actinides
The lanthanides and actinides are separated from the rest of the periodic table, usually appearing as separate rows below the rest of the periodic table. The reason for this placement has to do with the electron configurations of these elements.

The Killing Power of Bleach and Vinegar
Some household chemicals should not be mixed. Here's an explanation why it's dangerous, even potentially lethal, if you mix bleach and vinegar.

How to Properly Dispose of Mercury in Your Home
Mercury is an extremely toxic metal that is found in fluorescent light bulbs, mercury thermometers, and other household items. If you break a thermometer or a mercury-containing bulb, it's important to dispose of the mercury properly so that you don't accidentally poison yourself or contaminate the area with mercury.

Home Chemicals List - Make a Home Chemistry Kit
This is a list of chemicals you can obtain easily and safely store at home for projects and experiments.

Four Steps to Finding the Molecular Mass of a Compound
It is easy to find the molecular mass of a compound with these steps.

Rubber Egg & Chicken Bones - Mad Scientist Lab
You can make a hard boiled egg bounce like a rubber ball and cause chicken bones to become soft and rubbery. All you need is a common kitchen ingredient.

How to Make Copper Sulfate - Copper and Sulfuric Acid
Mske copper sulfate or copper sulphate yourself from copper and sulfuric acid.

Make Potassium Nitrate From Lite Salt and a Cold Pack
Make potassium nitrate (saltpeter) from common household ingredients. Potassium chloride from lite salt and ammonium nitrate from a cold pack are reacted to yield potassium nitrate and ammonium chloride. This is an easy way to make your own potassium nitrate if you can't find it in a store or just want to try a fun chemistry experiment.

Newton's First, Second and Third Laws of Motion
Newton's Laws of Motion help us to understand how objects behave when they are standing still, when they are moving, and when forces act upon them. There are three laws of motion. Here is a description of Newton's Laws of Motion and a summary of what they mean.

What Is Plasma and What Is It Used For?
Here's a look at what plasma is, what plasma is used for and what plasma is made of. Examples of plasma also are provided.

Homemade Dippin' Dots Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream
Dippin' Dots consist of ice cream that has been cryogenically frozen. Here's how to make your own Dippin' Dots ice cream.

Why Are Light and Heat Not Matter? - Matter vs Energy
Light and heat are not matter. Here's an explanation of why this is and how you can tell matter and energy apart.

Homemade Fire Extinguisher Science Project
A fire extinguisher is an important piece of safety equipment in both the home and lab. While it's a good idea to have a regulation fire extinguisher for emergencies, you can make your own fire extinguisher using common kitchen ingredients to learn how fire extinguishers work and to learn about gases.

How to Make a Home Made Lava Lamp
Lava lamps are interesting and cool. Have you ever wanted to make your own lava lamp? Lava lamps that you buy use high heat and toxic chemicals, but you can make a lava lamp at home using safe kitchen ingredients. Here's how.

How Hair Detangler Works (With Homemade Recipe)
Learn the chemistry behind how hair detangler works and get recipes to make your own homemade hair detangler.

How To Name Simple Alkene Chains
Simple alkene chains hydrocarbon chains with at least one carbon-carbon double bond and are named after the number of carbon atoms in the molecule. It is a good idea to commit the names of the simple alkene chains to memory.

How to Make Crystals
Learn how to make crystals. This is a collection of easy crystal growing recipes, with photos of what the crystals look like and tips for how to make your crystals a success.

What to Do if You Are Failing Chemistry
Are you failing chemistry? Don't panic. Here's a look at what you can do and how you can make the best of the situation and possibly turn it around.

What Is Deuterium?
What is deuterium? Here's a look at what deuterium is, where you might find it, and some of the uses of deuterium.

Ideal Gas Law - Chemistry Glossary
Here is a look at what the Ideal Gas Law is and how to use it.

Crystal Definition, Examples, and Common Types
Get the definition for a crystal and learn about some common types of crystals.

Graham's Law - Gas Diffusion-Effusion Example Problem
Graham's law relates the rate of diffusion or effusion of a gas to its molar mass. This example problem uses Graham's law to find the difference in effusion rates between two different gases.

Guy-Lussac's Ideal Gas Law Example
Guy-Lussac's gas law is a special case of the ideal gas law where the volume of the gas is held constant. When the volume is held constant, the pressure exerted by a gas is directly proportional to the absolute temperature of the gas. This example problem uses Guy-Lussac's law to find the pressure of a heated container.

Root Square Mean Velocity Example Problem
Gases are made up of individual atoms or molecules freely moving in random directions with a wide variety of speeds. The average of the particle velocities can be calculated using kinetic molecular theory. This example problem shows how to find the average or root mean square velocity of particles in a gas sample for a given temperature.