Classic Literature Sitemap - Page 7 2016-09-26

Romanticism & The Supernatural in Edgar Allan Poe's Ligeia
Although the movement began more than 130 years ago, readers today are still trying to define the highly complex genre known as American Romanticism. Read more about Romanticism and the supernatural as they relate to Edgar Allan Poe's

'Robinson Crusoe' Quotes
Robinson Crusoe is a famous novel by Daniel Defoe. The novel was based on the tale of a shipwrecked seaman, Alexander Selkirk. Here are a few quotes from the novel.

'Robinson Crusoe' Questions for Study and Discussion
Robinson Crusoe is the famous first novel by Daniel Defoe. A young man is shipwrecked and stranded on a deserted island. It's the stuff dreams are made of, but there's more to it than that. Here are a few questions for study and discussion.

J.D. Salinger Quotes
J.D. Salinger is one of the most famous writers of the 20th century, known for his controversial novel, The Catcher in the Rye. Read a few of the quotes from J.D. Salinger.

'Antony and Cleopatra' Quotes
Antony and Cleopatra is a tragedy by William Shakespeare (first printed in 1623). The play is based on Plutarch's Life of Mark Antony. The plot follows the story of the Roman, Mark Antony, and Cleopatra. Here are a few quotes from Antony and Cleopatra.

Thanksgiving - What Do Famous Authors Write About Thanksgiving? - Thanksgiving Quotes
What do famous authors write about Thanksgiving Day, and the sentiment that goes along with our famous holiday? Here are a few lines from the greatest writers. Read what Mark Twain, Ambrose Bierce, and others have written about Thanksgiving.

What's so different about an online book club?
What's the difference between an online book club and a traditional one? Why are online book clubs so popular? And, what do you need to consider if you want to start (or join) an online book club?

What is a Book Club?
What is a book club? Why do we love to get together and discuss books? What can you learn from other readers at a book club meeting? Here's a discussion about book clubs.

'Three Chinese Poets' Review
In this slim volume, Vikram Seth offers translations for three eighth-century Chinese poets: Wang Wei, Li Bai (or Li Po), and Du Fu (or Tu Fu). Seth's aim in creating these translations is to be consistent to the form and language of the Chinese poets, not focusing as much on the poetic flow of the lines.

Bram Stoker's Dracula
To commemorate the centenary of Dracula, Carol Margaret Davison has brought together this collection of essays by some of the world's leading scholars. This book offers analysis of Stoker's original work, but also celebrates the influence this famous monster has had upon our literature and culture.

'How to Read Literature Like a Professor' Review
Thomas Foster opens up a new world of literature, drawing from some of the world's greatest classics to explore what literature is, what it means to us, and how we can understand it. It's a fun and entertaining introduction for students and book lovers alike.

'A Christmas Carol' Adaptations
In 1843, A Christmas Carol appeared. It was the first in a series of successful Christmas books by Charles Dickens. He financed the publishing of the book himself--with gilt-edging and hand-colored illustrations. Read on.

'A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court' Review
Mark Twain is often thought of as the great cynic in American literature. A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is perhaps one of the most cynical of his works. In this amusing story, Twain takes an American entrepreneur from his own day and age, and thrusts him back through time to King Arthur's reign. Read more about this famous book, with this book review from Katharine Swan.

'Dracula' Review
Dracula, written by Bram Stoker and published in 1897, reads like any horror novel written today. Read more in this review by Katharine Swan.

The Book Thief
Death walks through

Emma
Emma was Jane Austen's fourth novel, published first in 1816. It stands as a classic romantic comedy--full of wit and irony. Read more about this novel.

'Gulliver's Travels' Review
There are few great satirists who manage to judge their work so finely that it can be considered both a rip-roaring, fantastical adventure story suitable for children and adults alike, as well as a searing attack on the nature of society.

'Howards End' Review
Edward Morgan Forster's fourth novel Howards End came out in 1910, the very year in which, according to Virginia Woolf, the human character changed. The novel's influence in English literature is thus dually related to the social climate of the time and the author's treatment of ideas pertaining to the broad question: who will inherit England?

'King Arthur' Review
King Arthur appears in the literature of Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chretien de Troyes, Geoffrey Chaucer, Marie de France, Sir Thomas Malory, Alfred Lord Tennyson, and Mark Twain. But, who was he? Who was his queen? And what about the other figures of Arthurian myth and legend: Gawain, Lancelot, Merlin, and Modred?

'Little Women' Review
In Little Women, Marmee offers moral guidance and unconditional love to her girls: Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy. Read more about Marmee and her little women in Louisa May Alcott's famous novel.

'The Reef' Review
The plot of The Reef is nucleated around the complexity of relationship between three leading characters: George Darrow, Sophy Viner, and Anna Leath. Darrow enters into a brief liaison with the young and pretty Sophy. His engagement with the wealthy widow, Anna, then suffers in more than one way, especially when Anna's stepson, Owen, proposes to Sophy. The emotional turmoil that results from this complex situation is the main focus of the novel.

'The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson' Review


'Walden' Review
Walden was published around 1854, during the reign of the transcendentalists; in fact, Henry David Thoreau, the book's author, was a member of the movement. If transcendentalism were around today, we would probably call its followers: new-age folk, hippies, or nonconformists. In fact, much of what transcendentalism stood for back then is still alive and well today.

How to Plan Out Your Summer Reading List - - Make a List
The months of summer can be a time when lots of activities are taking place. You may be going on vacation, or to the beach, or hiking, or biking, or you may be participating in all sorts of other activities. Whether you're staying home, or traveling near or far, you'll want to have a summer reading list that's perfect for your needs. Here are some tips!

Edgar Allan Poe Biography
Edgar Allan Poe is one of the most enigmatic figures in American literature. His history was sad and lonely, which makes it hardly a surprise that his tales are known for their bits of horror, mystery and the supernatural.

Robert Louis Stevenson Biography
(1850-1894) Scottish writer. Robert Louis Stevenson was born on November 13, 1850 in Edinburgh, Scotland. He became one of the most famous writers of the 19th century with works like The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886) and Treasure Island (1882). Read more about the life and works of Robert Louis Stevenson.

How to Succeed in Your Literature Class
Whether you're taking an English class in high school or registered for a literature class in college, learn steps you can take to succeed in your literature class. Listening, reading, and being prepared for your class can make a dramatic difference in how you understand the books, poetry, and stories for your class. Read more about how to succeed in your literature class.

Mary Shelley Biography
Famous for Frankenstein, Mary Shelley was the daughter of Mary Wollstonecraft, and the wife of the Romantic poet, Percy Bysshe Shelley. Read more about the life and works of Mary Shelley.

O. Henry (William Sydney Porter)
O. Henry (pseudonym for William Sydney Porter) was born in on September 11, 1862 in Greensboro, North Carolina; and he became famous for his short stories. Read more about the life and works of O. Henry.

Walden - Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau wrote

'A Christmas Carol' Questions for Study and Discussion
A Christmas Carol is always a favorite Christmas story, with Scrooge the famously unrepentant sinner. He is visited by the ghost of past, present and future. Here are a few questions for study and discussion.

'The Gift of the Magi' Quotes
The Gift of the Magi is a holiday favorite. The cherished moments in this work have become a Christmas tradition--in the original and many iterations. Do you remember the quotes? Perhaps you've read or heard the lines without even realizing it. Here are a few quotes from the short story.

'Brave New World' Questions for Study and Discussion
Brave New World is one of the most controversial and best-known works of Aldous Huxley. In this dystopian novel, Huxley foretold technological advances in many facets of society--including test-tube babies, sleep learning, etc. The novel has been listed as one of the top English-language books of the 20th century. Here are a few questions for study and discussion.

'Lord of the Flies' Summary
Lord of the Flies has has a tumultuous history, and it's still controversial even today. But where did the controversy come from, and why (with the controversy) is it still such a well-read book in literature classrooms?

Atticus Finch Biography
Atticus Finch is one of the greatest fictional figures in American literature. Both in the book and in the film, Atticus stands larger-than-life, bold-and-courageous against the falsehood and injustice. He risks his life and his career (seemingly without care), as he defends a black man against charges of rape (which were based on lies, fear and ignorance).

'To Kill a Mockingbird' - Banned?
There are several reasons that the content of Harper Lee's great novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, is sometimes considered so controversial (and inappropriate for young audiences) that it is banned, challenged, as well as removed from school/library lists and shelves.

'The Grass is Singing' Quotes
The Grass is Singing was the first novel by Doris Lessing. The book was published in 1950. Here are quotes from the novel.

'Venus in Furs' Review
Leopold Von Sacher-Masoch was a historian, folklorist, collector of stories, and progressive thinker of the mid-to-late 1900s, but even though he produced dozens of books in any number of genres, he’s almost solely known for his infamous novella Venus in Furs.

'The Voyage of Saint Brendan' Review
The historical Saint Brendan was born in Ireland in the late fifth century and is thought to have lived for approximately one hundred years, and although it’s widely accepted that he founded several monastic cells in his native country, little else is known for certain about the true events of his life.

'The Fables of Jean de La Fontaine' Review
Although Molière, Racine, and Corneille are often thought of as the greatest French literary artists of the late seventeenth century—their extraordinary plays standing as what we now think of as Classical French theater—it was the shrewd fable-writer Jean de La Fontaine who produced perhaps the richest body of work of his period.

'Night' Trilogy - Review
Elie Wiesel's memoir Night is perhaps the one document that should be required reading for a world that wants to understand what it's become...

'The Nibelungenlied' ('The Song of the Nibelungs') Review
The Nibelungenlied (or The Song of the Nibelungs) came at a pivotal shift in poetic modes, when the brutal histories that it recounts needed to be tempered to an age of courtly chivalry, creating a strange and complex web of narrative priorities and strategies.

'The Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault' Review
The seventeenth-century French writer Charles Perrault not only solidified the fairy tale as a literary genre, but wrote nearly all of the genre’s most signature stories, his tales entering the culture in ways that far transcend his own personal artistic reach.

'The Magic Toyshop' Review
The Magic Toyshop is the best and most representative of Angela Carter's early work. It's a novel taking up both old and new themes--written in a neo-Gothic style that recalls the creepiness of the Brontes, while being decidedly modern in both outlook and method.

Review: 'Closely Watched Trains'
Worldwide, the most famous Czech-language writer is Milan Kundera, who’s known for fusing the political with the personal and the sexual in his works, but the writer who first started to break away from dogma and into the realm of true art was Bohumil Hrabal, and his breakthrough novel was 1965’s Closely Watched Trains.

Review: 'Confessions of an English Opium-Eater'
Serialized in two consecutive months’ editions of London Magazine in 1821, the first version of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater was hurriedly and haphazardly composed during a short period when De Quincey’s opium-use was at a temporary minimum.

Review: 'Confessions of an English Opium-Eater'
Serialized in two consecutive months’ editions of London Magazine in 1821, the first version of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater was hurriedly and haphazardly composed during a short period when De Quincey’s opium-use was at a temporary minimum. Page 2.

Review: 'Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'
Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography has long stood as one of the most famous and exemplary memoirs in American and world history, and Franklin himself has often been held up as a multifaceted microcosm of America itself, for better or worse.

'Emma Lazarus: Selected Poems' Review
This particular collection is a small treasure previously hidden, laden with literary gold of a previous century for discovery by today’s seekers. This is a book I carry with me.

Review: 'The Remains of the Day'
Written a bare 20 years ago, The Remains of the Day has quickly become a classic of the contemporary canon (aided, no doubt, by the brilliant film version starring Antony Hopkins and Emma Thompson). Written with a keen eye for English manners and the passionate depths that lurk beneath that nation’s well-known reserve, it is a piece that both inhabits and plays with a specific genre of literature.

Review: 'Prime of Miss Jean Brodie'
A book that recently took me for such a surprising series of turns—and one that I’ve owned two copies of and that had passed (or not passed) through nearly two decades’ worth of shelves, boxes, and collection-downsizings because of its ho-hum self-description—is Muriel Spark’s The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie.

Review: 'Prime of Miss Jean Brodie'
A book that recently took me for such a surprising series of turns—and one that I’ve owned two copies of and that had passed (or not passed) through nearly two decades’ worth of shelves, boxes, and collection-downsizings because of its ho-hum self-description—is Muriel Spark’s The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie. Page 2.

How to Start a Book Club
Books are better appreciated and understood when we're able to share in the experience--through discussion and interaction with the text. That's just part of why book clubs are so great! With a book club, you can meet for coffee, wine or beer--just chat about the book, author, time period, and/or related topics of interest. It's a great way to stay connected with your bookish friends, and it can keep you on-track with your reading goals. Here are a few tips to help you get started.

Franz Kafka Biography
Franz Kafka is one of the most famous modernist writers. His life was filled with turmoil, darkness and loss. And, his works grew out of that very tempestuous past. What do you know about the life and works of Franz Kafka? Yes, he wrote about a giant bug, but he created so much more. Here's a bit about his life...

Franz Kafka Biography
Julie Lwy was the daughter of a brewer, when Hermann Kafka met and married her (she was 26). Read more about the life and works of Franz Kafka. Page 2.

Franz Kafka Biography: His Birth
Franz Kafka was born on July 3, 1883. He was the first child of Julie and Hermann Kafka. Read more about the life and works of Franz Kafka. Page 3.

His Childhood
Franz Kafka is one of the most famous modernist writers. His life was filled with turmoil, darkness and loss. And, his works grew out of that very tempestuous past. What do you know about the life and works of Franz Kafka? Yes, he wrote about a giant bug, but he created so much more. Here's a bit about his life... Page 4.

Higher Education and Work
After briefly starting out by studying chemistry, Franz Kafka studied law at Charles Ferdinand University. Read more about the life and works of Franz Kafka. Page 5.

Writing
Franz Kafka saw his writing as being about his father... Read more about his life and works. Page 6.

Bibliography
Franz Kafka is one of the most famous modernist writers. His life was filled with turmoil, darkness and loss. And, his works grew out of that very tempestuous past. What do you know about the life and works of Franz Kafka? Yes, he wrote about a giant bug, but he created so much more. Here's a bit about his life... Page 7.

Wilfred Owen Biography
(1893–1918) British writer. Wilfred Owen is an important 20th-century British writer, famous for poems like

Victor Hugo Biography
(1802-1885) Victor Hugo is a famous French writer: novelist, playwright, essayist and poet. Some of his most well-known works include: Les Misrables and Notre-Dame de Paris (The Hunchback of Notre-Dame).

Gabriel García Márquez Biography
Gabriel Garca Mrquez is a famous Latin American writer, known for One Hundred Years of Solitude and many other novels, plays, essays, and other works. He received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1982. Read more about the life and works of one of the greatest Columbian writers.

'The Boy in the Striped Pajamas' Quotes
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas follows the lives (and friendship) of two young boys--across the Holocaust fence at the Auschwitz Camp. One boy is the son of a high-ranking SS officer, while the other is the son of a Polish Jew. Here are quotes from the novel.

'Hedda Gabbler' Quotes
Hedda Gabbler is one of the most famous (and controversial) plays by Henrik Ibsen.

'A Rose for Emily' Quotes
A Rose for Emily is a short story by William Faulkner. It's one of the most popular (and controversial) works, and it's also often discussed in literature classrooms.

'A Rose for Emily' Questions for Study and Discussion
A Rose for Emily is a favorite American short story by William Faulkner. Here are a few questions for study and discussion.

Jacques Derrida Quotes
Jacques Derrida is a famous French philosopher and writer, known for his work on deconstruction literary theory. He had a way with words, contributing to literary criticism and study. Here are quotes from the famous theorist!

April Quotes - What Great Writers Have Said
April showers bring May flowers... but April also brings National Poetry Month, April Fool's Day, Jazz Appreciation Month, and more. What does April mean to you? Here are some quotes...

Ian Fleming Quotes - Lines from the author of James Bond
Ian Fleming is perhaps most famous as the creator of the James Bond series (infamous spy novels). Fleming was an author, intelligence officer and journalist (an ideal combination to create one of the most unforgettable, and timeless, characters in literary history). Here are a few quotes from the life and fictional works of Ian Fleming.

Medusa Quotes - What do writers say about Medusa?
Medusa is a monstrosity, with a mass of snakes coming out of her head. Here are a few quotes about Medusa.

Night Quotes - What Writers Say About Night
Night is the time of darkness, when secrets lie hidden and unknowable. In literature, some of the most beautiful lines of poetry and prose were written about night.

Genesis Quotes
It's the first book, from the Old Testament of the Bible. Here are a few quotes.

Adam, Lilith and Eve
Adam, Lilith and Eve is a poem by Robert Browning.

A Haunted House - Virginia Woolf
A Haunted House is a fantasy short story by Virginia Woolf, published in 1921. The story is about a ghost couple who haunt the house in which they used to live.

Chinua Achebe Quotes
Chinua Achebe was a famous African writer, famous for Things Fall Apart. He's been called the grandfather of African literature. His work was controversial (even banned), but he also helped to make African literature more popular and mainstream on the world stage. Only time will tell the true scope of his contributions to literary history and culture.

'A Clockwork Orange' Quotes
A Clockwork Orange is a dystopian novel by Anthony Burgess. Here are quotes...

'Little Match Girl' Questions for Study and Discussion
It's a famous tale, but it's also controversial. What can we learn from the story of a little girl, who is trying to sell matches on a cold day?

'The Little Match Girl' Review
When I first heard the story of The Little Match Girl, I was left with the most vivid images. I could see the little girl--so poor and cold and forlorn, as she lit the match. What are your earliest memories of The Little Match Girl?

Cinderella Questions for Study and Discussion
Cinderella is one of the most popular fairy tales. Versions of the story can be found around the world. Here are a few questions for study and discussion.

'The Autumn of the Patriarch' Quotes - Gabriel García Márquez
The Autumn of the Patriarch is a novel Gabriel Garca Mrquez, a Columbian writer well-known for A Hundred Years of Solitude. The author said the book was a

'War and Peace' Quotes
War and Peace is one of the great epic novels by Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy. Here are a few quotes from the book--to give you a taste for this great classic!

'The Beautiful and Damned' Quotes
The Beautiful and Damned is the second novel, published by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The book is about Anthony Patch, a socialite during the 1920s Jazz Age. Here are quotes from the famous classic.

Famous Last Lines of Novels
The last lines of novels are the final word. The author may offer resolution (or just more questions). In the end, we take what we can get. Which of the famous last lines in literature is your favorite?

'The Phantom Tollbooth' Quotes
If you've never played with the conceptualizations of words and numbers, here's a great opportunity. The novel has been compared with Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, as an update to the 1865 classic. Here are a few quotes from the famous fantasy by Norton Juster.

'Young Goodman Brown' Quotes
Young Goodman Brown is a short story from Nathaniel Hawthorne. The work centers around a young Puritan in New England, and his deal with the Devil. The work (and author) are famous for their representation of American Romantic literature.

'Rappaccini's Daughter' Questions for Study and Discussion
Rappaccini's Daughter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, is one of the author's most famous works. Here are a few questions for study and discussion, related to Rappaccini's Daughter.

'To the Lighthouse' Questions for Study and Discussion
To The Lighthouse is one of the most well-known works by Virginia Woolf. Here are a few questions for study and discussion.

'To the Lighthouse' Quotes
To the Lighthouse is one of the most well-known works by Virginia Woolf. Here are a few quotes.

'The Adventure of the Speckled Band' Quotes
The Adventure of Speckled Band is a locked room mystery, a story by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The short story was published in Strand Magazine in February 1892, with illustrations by Sidney Paget.

Rudyard Kipling - Biographical Sketch
Rudyard Kipling was an English poet and fiction writer, famous for The Jungle Book (a collection of stories), Just So Stories, Kim (1901) (a tale of adventure), many short stories and many poems.

'The Evolution of the Short-Story' - Part 1
What are the origins of the short story? William J. Dawson and Coningsby W. Dawson write about the the evolution of the short-story form. here's Part 1.

Utopian Literature - List of Works in Utopia
Utopian literature often portrays a society that seems in some ways perfect--a paradise. But, even in a peaceful and prosperous community, there may be some elements of the dystopian vision (human nature may naturally introduce evil, pain and death--or other elements of repression). The main characters may discover that their utopia is not all that they hoped for and dreamed of. The reality may threaten to destroy everything they believe in. Still, the possibility of Utopia is ever tantalizing. It's a dream that we'd all live in a society where we don't fear each other--when nobody is hungry or sick... Paradise on Earth.

The Revolution
The American Revolution is fertile backdrop for American writers. It's all about the American spirit...

Rudyard Kipling
Rudyard Kipling is one of the most famous writers of the Victorian period in English literature. Read what Robert Huntington Fletcher has to say about his life and works.

'The Snow Queen' Fairy Tale - Fifth Story
The Snow Queen is a fairy tale by Hans Christian Anderson--centering around a brother and a sister. The story was first published in 1845.

Franz Kafka Love Letter
Franz Kafka is a famous writer, known for works like Metamorphosis, his famous buggy tale (variously interpreted as a beetle or cockroach). He was not well known during his lifetime, but some of his works (and letters) have survived. Here's a love letter by Franz Kafka.

Franz Kafka Quotes
He's famous for writing about a man who turns into a bug, and also a man who starves himself to death for his art. The works of Franz Kafka explore alienation, isolation and existentialist angst. Here are a few quotes.

'A Hunger Artist' Short Story - Franz Kafka
In one sense, A Hunger Artist, by Franz Kafka explores our fascination for the bizarre, even grotesque. Crowds are drawn to the spectacles at freak shows or circuses. But, there's a reality associated with this story as well. As human beings, we see people hungry, but do nothing. There's also the biographical connection--Kafka may have actually starved to death at the very end of his life (with complications from the tuberculosis that ravaged his body). Here's the story.

The First Colonial Literature
Bliss Perry writes about Colonial Literature.

The Pioneers
Bliss Perry writes about the pioneers in The American Spirit in Literature.

Frances Hodgson Burnett Quotes
Frances Hodgson Burnett was an important woman writer of her time, famous for works like The Secret Garden and A Little Princess. Here are a few quotes from the author, from her most well-known novels.

'The Hunchback of Notre-Dame' Summary / Overview
The Hunchback of Notre-Dame is one of the most famous novels by Victor Hugo.

Victor Hugo List of Works
Here's the list of works from Victor Hugo.

'To Kill a Mockingbird' Summary
To Kill a Mockingbird is the only known novel by Harper Lee. With this famous and controversial novel, Lee forged her place in American literature as a chronicler of 1930's racial injustice.

'The Cask of Amontillado' Questions for Study & Discussion
The Cask of Amontillado is one of Edgar Allan Poe's most memorable works of horror. The story depicts betrayal and murderous revenge. Here are a few questions for study and discussion.

'The Cask of Amontillado' Short Story
The Cask of Amontillado (The Casque of Amontillado) is a famous short story by Edgar Allan Poe. It's a work of horror, published in November 1846 in Godey's Lady's Book.

'A Simple Heart' - Part 3
A Simple Heart is part of a collection, Three Tales, by Gustave Flaubert. Here's the third part.

'A Simple Heart' - Part 4
A Simple Heart is part of a collection, Three Tales, by Gustave Flaubert. Here's the fourth part.

'The Color Purple' Questions for Study and Discussion
The Color Purple is a novel by Alice Walker. The book is written in epistolary style, through a series of letters, and it's been controversial since it was first published in 1982. The treatment of women and the depiction of life in the American South during the 1930's is striking. Here are a few questions for study and discussion.

'The Scarlet Pimpernel' Questions for Study and Discussion
The Scarlet Pimpernel is an famous adventure novel, by Baroness Emmuska Orczy. Here are a few questions for study and discussion.

'The Hobbit' Terms/Vocabulary
Here's a vocabulary list from The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien. Use these terms for reference, study, and discussion.

'Sense and Sensibility' Questions for Study & Discussion
Sense and Sensibility is one of the great romantic works by Jane Austen. Here are a few questions for study and discussion.

'Sense and Sensibility' Review
Sense and Sensibility is the first work by Jane Austen. It's not the work for which she is usually most well known, but it demonstrates many of the literary features for which Jane Austen would become so well known. She initially published the novel anonymously, under the byline of

The Story of My Life - Helen Keller's Certain Slant
Helen Keller probably had more tactile experience with the world than the majority of the world’s greatest writers--and more than the rest of humanity. She loved the outdoors, and she strove to experience it (and to describe it) in ways rarely seen in even the finest naturalists. Page 5.

The Story of My Life - Helen Keller's Certain Slant
Helen Keller probably had more tactile experience with the world than the majority of the world’s greatest writers--and more than the rest of humanity. She loved the outdoors, and she strove to experience it (and to describe it) in ways rarely seen in even the finest naturalists.

The Story of My Life - Helen Keller's Certain Slant
Helen Keller probably had more tactile experience with the world than the majority of the world’s greatest writers--and more than the rest of humanity. She loved the outdoors, and she strove to experience it (and to describe it) in ways rarely seen in even the finest naturalists. Page 2.

The Story of My Life - Helen Keller's Certain Slant
Helen Keller probably had more tactile experience with the world than the majority of the world’s greatest writers--and more than the rest of humanity. She loved the outdoors, and she strove to experience it (and to describe it) in ways rarely seen in even the finest naturalists. Page 4.

The Story of My Life - Helen Keller's Certain Slant
Helen Keller probably had more tactile experience with the world than the majority of the world’s greatest writers--and more than the rest of humanity. She loved the outdoors, and she strove to experience it (and to describe it) in ways rarely seen in even the finest naturalists. Page 3.

What inspired 'Lolita'?
Lolita is one of the most controversial novels in literary history? What inspired Vladimir Nabokov to write the novel? How did the idea evolve over time, and why is the novel now considered one of the great fiction books of the 20th century? Here are some answers...

'A Rose for Emily' Importance of the gray hair?
Miss Emily was a mainstay, a fixture in the community. She seemed harmless, and not worth much thought or consideration, but what was she really capable of? What is the meaning of the gray hair?

'The Storm' - Title Meaning?
What is important about the title of the short story,

'A Rose for Emily' - Title
What is important about the title of the short story,

'Wuthering Heights' Title
Wuthering Heights is a great title! It sounds Gothic--it sets the mood for one of the most tragic love stories in literary history.

Women in Wuthering Heights?
What is the role of women in Wuthering Heights? How are mothers represented? What about single/independent women?

What do I do if I'm in love with a Fictional Character?
What do you do if you're in love with a fictional character?

Why was the novel entitled: 'Jane Eyre'?
Why was the novel entitled: Jane Eyre?

Identify a First Edition Book
The first edition or first-run of a book is often worth more (of significantly greater value). So, how do you identify a first-edition book?

Banned Book: 'The Great Gatsby'
The Great Gatsby is one of the great American novels, from the Jazz Age. It's the work for which F. Scott Fitzgerald is often best remembered? So, what's the controversy about? Has it been banned or challenged?

'The Great Gatsby' Movie Adaptations
What are some of the adaptations of The Great Gatsby? Was it made into a movie? What other ways was the text adapted?

What inspired 'The Great Gatsby'?
The Great Gatsby is one of the great American classics, but what inspire F. Scott Fitzgerald to write the book? Was he drawing details from his life, from his imagination, from what he witnessed around him? How well did he turn the rich fabric of material into a novel?

Women: 'The Great Gatsby'
The Great Gatsby is filled with characters who appear to be larger-than-life, living the American Dream in true, BIG 1920's Jazz-Age style. But, if the men are making all the money, and supporting the lavish lifestyles, what are the women doing? What roles do they play on this splendorous stage?

'The Grapes of Wrath' Importance of the Title
What is important about the title of The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck? Where did the phrase come from? Why is it so important to understand the historical context, and how it has evolved over times?

'The Grapes of Wrath' - Biblical Reference
What is the Biblical reference to the grapes of wrath that appears to be the earliest known source or inspiration for John Steinbeck's famous novel?

'The Grapes of Wrath' Purpose
The Grapes of Wrath is one of the greatest epic novels in American literature, but what is John Steinbeck's purpose in writing the novel? What meaning did he infuse into the pages of this great American novel?

New Year's Books
Every year, people from around the world participate in festivities related to ringing in the new year. Discover how different traditions and culture celebrate New Year's Day. Also, find out the origins of the holiday. Read on.

'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest' Quotes
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is the famous novel by Ken Kesey about insanity and the individual--with the concept of revolution figured in. The book is set in an Oregon insane asylum and centers around the struggles of patients to gain some sense of freedom in the repressive environment. Here are a few quotes from One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.

'A Murder, A Mystery, and A Marriage' Review
A Murder, A Mystery, and A Marriage is a story left very much undone, not for Mark Twain's lack of trying. Twain had dreamed up this blindfold-novelette scheme, where other famous writers of the day would join him in contributing ending of the story for publication in The Atlantic Monthly. Read more about Mark Twain's plan, and what became of his misadventured tale.

Oscar Wilde Biography
(1854-1900) Irish writer. Oscar Wilde was an Irish poet and dramatist, famous for The Importance of Being Earnest and The Picture of Dorian Gray. His controversial, open lifestyle caused him to be charged and eventually convicted for the crime of sodomy. Read more about the life and works of Oscar Wilde.

Alabama Literature Programs
Learn more about literature programs in Alabama.

Mark Twain Impersonators - Classic Literature
Discover a directory of Mark Twain impersonators, including live and virtual performers.

Don Quixote FAQs
You've got questions regarding Don Quixote. I've got answers. Take a look here.

Ishmael
Ishmael appears in Moby Dick, by Herman Melville.

The Comedy of Errors FAQs
You've got questions regarding The Comedy of Errors. I've got answers. Take a look here.

Wicked Stepmother in Fairy Tales - Classic Literature
The Wicked Stepmother is a well-known character in fairy tales like Cinderella.

Aztec and Mayan Mythology
Provides access to the essence of these cultures through archaeology, pictograms, and renderings of legends.

Finnish Mythology - Mythology and Folklore
Find a fisherman's prayer to the father of sea-life who resembled a walrus, and to whom healing incantations were addressed. Read more about Finnish mythology.

American Literary Theory - Early 20th Century
Read more about British literary theory and criticism in the early 20th century...

British Literary Theory - Early 20th Century
Read more about British literary theory and criticism in the early 20th century...

Norse Mythology
Internet resources on Norse Myths. Find descriptions of the various realms, the inhabitants, poetry, and a chat room.

Philippine Mythology - Classic Literature - Mythology and Folklore
Discover stories from various Philippine traditions, presented in a frames environment. Some stories include notes and links.

Animal Farm FAQs
You've got questions regarding Animal Farm. I've got answers. Take a look here.

Canadian Literary Theory - Early 20th Century
Read more about Canadian literary theory and criticism in the early 20th century...

Common Sense FAQs
You've got questions regarding Common Sense. I've got answers. Take a look here.

Jonathan Swift FAQs
You've got questions regarding Jonathan Swift. I've got answers. Take a look here.

South Pacific Mythology
This page provides information and details related to Classic Literature. Learn why Timor is in the shape of a crocodile. Also, find other legends from the South Pacific.

Arcadia FAQs
You've got questions regarding Arcadia. I've got answers. Take a look here.

Heart of Darkness FAQs
You've got questions regarding Heart of Darkness. I've got answers. Take a look here.

The Crucible FAQs
You've got questions regarding The Crucible. I've got answers. Take a look here.

Aurora Leigh FAQs
You've got questions regarding Aurora Leigh. I've got answers. Take a look here.

The Awakening FAQs
You've got questions regarding The Awakening. I've got answers. Take a look here.

Antigone FAQs
You've got questions regarding Antigone. I've got answers. Take a look here.

Jane Austen Centers
These organizations celebrate the life and works of Jane Austen, and they are popping up all over the world. Read more about Jane Austen societies and centers.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer FAQs
You've got questions regarding The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. I've got answers. Take a look here.

Amon - Egyptian Mythology
Egyptian Mythology. An ancient Egyptian deity. Represented as a ram.

By Country/State - College and University - Literature Program
Browse through listings for the literature programs at colleges and universities. This section is organized by country and state.

The Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court FAQs
You've got questions regarding The Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. I've got answers. Take a look here.

Days of Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving happens but once each year, but why not celebrate for a few more days... Here's a series that celebrates all that for which we have to be thankful.

A-to-Z Literature Programs - College and University
Browse through these listings of colleges and universities, which are posted from A-to-Z.

Christmas Stories - Holiday Tales for Christmas
Stories like The Gift of the Magi have become traditional Christmas favorites. Take a look at O. Henry's tale, and then move on to a few other holiday classics that you may not know about. Read more Christmas stories.

J.R.R. Tolkien FAQs - Frequently Asked Questions
You've got questions about J.R.R. Tolkien, and I've got answers. Take look at these frequently asked questions (FAQs) about J.R.R. Tolkien.

Christmas Poems - Holiday Poetry for Christmas
Christmas is the time to celebrate peace and joy. It's the time of giving and family togetherness. And, many great writers have written about the Christmas holiday season in poetic works of literature. Read about the birth of Jesus, Santa Claus, and other themes in these poems of Christmas. Discover holiday poetry!

Shakespeare in Film - Classic Literature
Internet resources on William Shakespeare. Find more information related to Shakespeare in film.

Valentine - Saint Valentine
At least three different Saint Valentines can be found.

Globe Theatres - Classic Literature
Celebrate Shakespeare and other writer old and new. Visit the Globe Theatres.

The Death of Ivan Ilyich FAQs
You've got questions regarding The Death of Ivan Ilyich. I've got answers. Take a look here.

Huckleberry Finn
Huckleberry Finn appears in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and other novels by Mark Twain.

Teaching Resources for Mark Twain - Classic Literature
This page provides online materials for teaching Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and other books by Mark Twain at the K-12 and college levels.

Atticus Finch
Atticus Finch is the father of Jean Louise Finch (known as Scout) and Jem Finch, in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee. He's a lawyer.

American Romantics - American Literature - Romantic Period
Find essential information about the Romantic period in American Literature, which included writers like Washington Irving, Emerson, Thoreau, Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathanial Hawthorne, Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, and others.

Art for Art's Sake - Literary Theory and Criticism.
Art for Art's Sake - Literary Theory and Criticism.

French Revolution
If you've read A Tale of Two Cities or The Scarlet Pimpernel, you've already discovered two dramatic depictions of the French Revolution (1789-1799). The period was important not only to French history and literature, but also to the history and literature of Western civilization.

Industrialization and Technological Advances in Literature
Reactions to the influences of industrialization and technological advances appeared in literature of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This page offers related links and resources.

World War II
World War II began in 1937, and it didn't end until 1945. The horrors of battles were only a part of the war-time tragedies; some 57 million people were killed, with genocidal acts. Writers around the world drew from the stuff of bombings, deaths, and devastation to create a World War II literature. Read more about the poems, stories, and other works.

Troy - Trojan War
Greek Mythology. Read about the famous stories and myths about Troy and that classic war - the Trojan War.

A List of Historical Fiction
If you're looking for more information for specific works of historical fiction, take a look at this list...

A List of Novels
If you're looking for more information for specific novels, take a look at this list...

Haiku Poetry
A Japanese verse form consisting of three unrhymed lines that together contain a total of 17 syllables.

Play and Script Guides - Theatre and Drama - Classic Literature
Read about writers in Drama and Theater from Ancient writers like Euripides, Terence, and Aristophanes to modern drama. Also find play and script guides.

Myth - By Country / Culture
A myth is a sacred or symbolic story from the past, and it may be ritualistic in nature. A myth may describe the origins of a people, or explain customs or traditions. Folklore is a collection of fictional tales, which describe how people and/or animals cope with the events of everyday life.

Patriotic / Heroic - Theme
Examples of patriotism can be found throughout the history of literature from around the world. Patriotism is a love of and devotion for one's country, and it can lead to heroism. A hero or patriot may be willing to sacrifice life and personal liberty to serve the national best interest.

Robert Frost (1874-1963) American writer.
(1874-1963) American writer. Robert Frost was one of the greatest American poets of the 20th century. Frost received the Pulitzer Prize four times.

Carlos Fuentes (1928- ) Mexican writer.
(1928- ) Mexican writer. Born in Panama City, Panama, his writing has heavily influenced contemporary Latin American literature.

Pedro Antonio Correia Garção (1724-1772) Portuguese writer.
(1724-1772) Portuguese writer. Pedro Antonio Correia Garo was a Portuguese poet, from the Neoclassical period. He wrote Cantata de Dido.

Gunter Grass (1927- ) German writer.
(1927- ) German writer. Gnter Grass is famous for The Tin Drum (1959). He received the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Love - Theme
Courtly love and romance has been the topic of literature throughout the ages. Read more about the stories, poetry, and other works...

Carl Gustaf Verner von Heidenstam (1859-1940) Swedish writer.
(1859-1940) Swedish writer. Carl Gustaf Verner von Heidenstam received the 1916 Nobel Prize for Literature in recognition of his significance as the leading representative of a new era in our literature.

Robert Heinlein (1907-1988) American writer.
(1907-1988) American writer. Robert Heinlein is one of the most important figures in science fiction for such works as Starship Troopers and Stranger in a Strange Land.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) American writer.
(1804-1864) American writer. After an initial period of anonymity during his so-called solitary years from 1825 to 1837, Nathaniel Hawthorne achieved an unfaltering reputation as an author of short stories, romances, essays, and children's books.

Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960) American writer
(1891-1960) American writer. Zora Neale Hurston wrote stories, novels and folklore. Among her works are: Jonah's Gourd Vine (1934), Mules and Men (1935), Tell My Horse (1937), and Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937).

Homer - Greek writer - Classic literature
Greek writer. Homer is the name traditionally assigned to the author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, the two major epics of Greek antiquity. Very little is known about him.

Ben Jonson (1572-1637) British writer
(1572-1637) British writer. Ben Jonson's first original play, Every Man in His Humour, was performed in 1598 by the Lord Chamberlain's Company. Jonson became a celebrity.

Julian of Norwich (1342-?) British writer.
(1342-?) British writer. Julian of Norwich was born Lady Juliana. She was a Medieval author and anchoress, who wrote Revelations of Divine Love.

Yasunari Kawabata (1899-1972) Japanese writer.
(1899-1972) Japanese writer. Yasunari Kawabata was the first Japanese writer to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Nikos Kazantzakis (1885-1957) Greek writer.
(1885-1957) Greek writer. Nikos Kazantzakis wrote essays, novels, poetry, tragedies, travel books, and much more.

Omar Khayyam (c.1050-1122) Persian writer.
(c1050-1122) Persian writer. A mathematician and astronomer, Omar Khayyam is remembered for the Rabayat.

William Langland (1330-1387) British writer
(1330-1400) British writer. The Vision of Piers Plowman (around 1362) has been attributed to William Langland, who died in 1400.

Maurice Maeterlinck (1862-1949) Belgian writer.
(1862-1949) Belgian writer. Maurice Maeterlinck developed his strongly mystical ideas in a number of prose works, among them Le Trsor des humbles (1896), La Sagesse et la destine (1898), and Le Temple enseveli (1902).

Heinrich Mann (1871-1950) German writer.
(1871-1950) German writer. An essayist, novelist, and playwright, Heinrich Mann was the brother of Thomas Mann. His works include: Small Town Tyrant (1905), The Blue Angel (1930), and more.

Thomas Mann (1875-1955) German writer.
(1875-1955) German writer. Thomas Mann was the winner of the 1929 Nobel Laureate in Literature principially for his great novel, Buddenbrooks, which has won steadily increased recognition.

François Charles Mauriac (1885-1970) French writer
(1885-1970) French writer. Franois Mauriac was an essayist, poet, playwright, and journalist. A Roman Catholic writer, he examined the problems of good and evil in human nature. He received the 1952 Nobel Prize in Literature.

John Milton (1608-1674) British writer
(1608-1674) British writer. John Milton returned to poetry after 20 years of writing pamphlets, which supported the revolution in England. John Milton is perhaps best known for Paradise Lost.

Novalis - Friedrich Leopold (1772-1801) German writer.
(1772-1801) German writer. Pseudonym of Friedrich Leopold, Freiherr von Hardenberg. Novalis is considered the founder of Romanticism.

Eugene O'Neill (1888-1953) American writer.
(1888-1953) American writer. Eugene Gladstone O'Neill won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1936, and Pulitzer Prizes for four of his plays: Beyond the Horizon (1920); Anna Christie (1922); Strange Interlude (1928); and Long Day's Journey Into Night (1957).

Thomas Love Peacock (1785-1866) British writer.
(1785-1866) British writer. Thomas Love Peacock was a novelist and poet. He wrote The Four Ages of Poetry (1820), which provoked Shelley's Defense of Poetry.

Henrik Pontoppidan (1857-1943) Danish writer.
(1857-1943) Danish writer. Henrik Pontoppidan received the 1917 Nobel Prize for Literature for his authentic descriptions of present-day life in Denmark.

Plato (c.428-347 BC) Greek Literature.
(c.428-347 BC) Greek writer. Plato is one of the greatest philosophers of all time. His works include: The Symposium, The Republic, Phaedo, and Phaedrus.

Plutarch (c. 45-125 A.D.) Roman writer.
(c. 45-125 A.D.) Roman writer. Plutarch was a celebrity writer in the Roman empire. His 78 surviving essays and other works are known as the Moralia.

Wladyslaw Stanislaw Reymont (1868-1925) Polish writer.
(1868-1925) Polish writer. Wladyslaw Stanislaw Reymont received the 1924 Nobel Prize for Literature for his great national epic, The Peasants.

Vita Sackville-West (1892-1962) British writer.
(1892-1962) British writer. Vita Sackville-West was a novelist and poet, who is known for The Land, for which she received the Hawthorne Prize.

Marquis de Sade (1740-1814) French writer.
(1740-1814) French writer. Marquis de Sade is known for Story of Juliette (1797), and The Bedroom Philosophers (1795). His works were labeled obscene and banned until the 20th century.

Ali Ahmad Said (1930-?) Syrian writer.
(1930-?) Syrian writer. Pseudonym Adonis. Ali Ahmad Said is known as a poet and literary critic, who was imprisoned for his political affiliations.

Edward Said (1935-2003) Palestinian writer.
(1935-2003) Palestinian writer. Edward Said was a Palestinian-American literary theorist and outspoken Palestinian activist. He was a professor of English and Comparative Literature.

Jose Saramago - Portuguese writer
Jose de Sousa Saramago is a Portuguese writer: journalist, novelist and playwright. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1998. Notable works include: Baltasar and Blimunda, The Year of the Death of Ricardo Reis, Blindness, The Gospel According to Jesus Christ.

Anne Sexton (Anne Gray Harvey) (1928-1974) American writer.
(1928-1974) American writer. Anne Sexton began to pursue her poetry writing upon the suggestion of a psychiatrist when she was hospitalized for a suicide attempt.

Robert Southey (1774-1843) British poet.
(1774-1843) British poet. Robert Southey was a Poet Laureate, who was friends with William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. He was one of the Lake Poets.

Carl Friedrich Georg Spitteler (1845-1924) Swiss writer.
(1845-1924) Swiss writer. Carl Friedrich Georg Spitteler received the 1919 Nobel Prize for Literature in special appreciation of his epic, Olympian Spring.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) Scottish writer
(1850-1894) Scottish writer. Robert Louis Stevenson is famous for Treasure Island and The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Stevenson also wrote and published travel books like An Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels with a Donkey (1879).

Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) Irish writer - Classic Literature
(1667-1745) Irish writer. Among English prose stylists, Jonathan Swift is a master of a perfectly clear, exact, and firm prose.

Bruno Schulz (1892-1942) Polish writer.
(1892-1942) Polish writer. Bruno Schulz was a writer, graphic artist and literary critic. His notable works include: Sanatorium Under the Sign of the Hourglass and The Street of Crocodiles. He was killed by a German Nazi officer.

Edmund Spenser (1552-1599) British writer.
(1552-1599) British writer. Edmund Spenser was the greatest non-dramatic poet of the Elizabethan age. The Shepherd's Calendar (1579) is one of his most famous works. Probably inspired by his friend Sidney, it is a collection of twelve pastorals. The Fairie Queen is another of his famous epic works.

Sappho (c. 630BC-?) Greek writer.
(c. 630BC-?) Greek writer. Find information about what we know of Sappho's life and works.

Jean-Paul Satre (1905-1980) French writer.
(1905-1980) French writer. Jean-Paul Satre received the Nobel Prize for his work.

Henryk Sienkiewicz (1846-1916) Polish writer.
(1846-1916) Polish writer. Henryk Sienkiewicz was awarded the 1905 Nobel Prize in Literature because of his outstanding merits as an epic writer. Probably his most widely translated work is Quo Vadis? (1896), a study of Roman society in the time of the emperor Nero.

Upton Sinclair (1878-1968) American wrier.
(1878-1968) American wrier. Upton Sinclair wrote more than 90 books, many of which were politically motivated. He published The Jungle in 1906, and it was an immediate bestseller.

Isaac Bashevis Singer (1904-1991) Polish-born American writer.
(1904-1991) Polish-born American writer. Isaac Bashevis Singer (pseudonym Warshofsky) received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1978 for his impassioned narrative art which, with roots in a Polish-Jewish cultural tradition, brings universal human conditions to life.

Felicia Skene (1821-1899) Scottish writer.
(1821-1899) Scottish writer. Felicia Skene was a friend of Florence Nightengale (1820-1910). Her works include: The Isles of Greece and Other Poems (1843); The Lesters (1847); Wayfaring Sketches (1847); and other works.

Sir Richard Steele (1672-1729) Irish writer.
(1672-1729) Irish writer. Pseudonym of Isaac Bickerstaff. Sir Richard Steele was an essayist, dramatist, journalist, and politician. His works include: The Funeral (1701), The Lying Lover (1703), The Tender Husband (1705), and The Conscious Lovers.

Laurence Sterne (1713-1768) British writer.
(1713-1768) British writer. Laurence Sterne is famous for

Bram Stoker (1845-1912) Irish writer.
(1845-1912) Irish writer. Bram Stoker is famous as the author of Dracula.

Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896) American writer.
(1811-1896) American writer. Harriet Beecher Stowe is best known for writing Uncle Tom's Cabin, in which she expresses her moral outrage at the institution of slavery and its destructive effects on both whites and blacks.

George Sand (1804-1876) French writer.
(1804-1876) French writer. Pseudonym for Aurore Dupin. George Sand was a Romantic novelist, whose irregular life and many love affairs shocked Parisian society.

Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) Scottish writer.
(1771-1832) Scottish writer. Sir Walter Scott was a novelist and poet, well-known for Rob Roy (1815), and The Black Dwarf.

George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) Irish writer.
(1856-1950) Irish writer. George Bernard Shaw was a playwright, essayist, political activist, lecturer, novelist, philosopher, revolutionary evolutionist, and most prolific letter writer in literary history.

Percy Shelley (1792-1822) British writer
(1792-1822) British writer. Percy Shelley is known for A Defense of Poetry, Ode to the West Wind, Prometheus Unbound, and other works during the Romantic period.

Richard Sheridan (1751-1816) Irish writer.
(1751-1816) Irish writer. Richard Sheridan was a dramatist and politician. One of his most well-known works is The School for Scandal.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586) British writer.
(1554-1586) British writer. Scholar, diplomat, poet, courtier, soldier, and gentleman, Sir Philip Sidney was admired for his attainments in all of these pursuits.

August Strindberg (1849-1912) Swedish writer.
(1849-1912) Swedish writer. August Strindberg was a playwright, novelis, and short-story writer. Strindberg wrote more than 70 plays.

Sir John Suckling (1609-1642) British writer.
(1609-1642) British writer. One of the Cavalier poets, Sir John Suckling is known for such poems as: A Ballad Upon a Wedding, Song: I prithee spare me gentle boy, and others.

Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941) Indian writer
(1861-1941) Indian writer. Rabindranath Tagore was awarded the 1913 Nobel Prize in Literature. In 1915, he was knighted by the British King George V. Tagore renounced his knighthood in 1919 following the Amritsar massacre of nearly 400 Indian demonstrators.

Booth Tarkington (1869-1946) American writer.
(1869-1946) American writer. Booth Tarkington is known for The Magnificent Ambersons (1918), which won the 1919 Pulitzer Prize in fiction, and Alice Adams (1921), which won the 1922 Pulitzer Prize in fiction.

James Thurber (1894-1961) American writer.
(1894-1961) American writer. James Thurber is known as a humorist, writer, and illustrator. His works include: Is Sex Necessary? (1929), The Owl in the Attic and Other Perplexities (1931), My Life and Hard Times (1933), The Middle-Aged Man on the Flying Trapeze (1935), Let Your Mind Alone! (1937), and Fables for Our Time (1940).

Sojourner Truth (1797-1883) African American.
(1797-1883) African American. Although she was illiterate, Sojourner Truth became well-known for her speaking and singing.

Gil Vicente (1470?-1536?) Portuguese writer.
(1470?-1536?) Portuguese writer. Works by dramatist and poet, Gil Vicente, include: The Ship of Hell (1516), The Ship of Purgatory (1518), and the Ship of Glory (1519). In all, Vicente wrote 44 plays.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) American writer.
(1856-1915) American writer. Booker T. Washington is known for books, which include: The Future of the American Negro (1899), his autobiography Up from Slavery (1901), Life of Frederick Douglass (1907), The Story of the Negro (1909), and My Larger Education (1911).

Nathanael West (1903-1940) American writer.
(1903-1940) American writer. Pseudonym of Nathan Wallenstein Weinstein. Nathanael West is known for his four novels. West also worked as a screenwriter in California.

Edmund White (1940-?) American writer.
(1940-?) American writer. Edmund White's works include:

Laura Ingalls Wilder (1867-1967) American writer.
(1867-1957) American writer. Laura Ingalls Wilder is famous for her

Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951) Austrian writer.
(1889-1951) Austrian writer. The works of Ludwig Wittenstein include: Tractatus, and Philosophical Investigations.

Easter
Writers have written about the Easter holiday for centuries. Some writers focus on the religious aspect of Easter, while others explore other, more secular, aspects of the holiday.

Mary Wroth (1587?-1651?) British writer.
(1587?-1651?) British writer. Lady Mary Wroth was the daughter of Robert Sidney and Barbara Gamage. Lady Wroth's prose romance The Countess of Montgomeries Urania was published in 1621. Other works include Urania (which was controversial because of the similarities to actual people) and Love's Vistory, an unpublished play.

Guy Fawkes Night
We celebrate Guy Fawkes Night on November 5 to commemorate the failure of the Gunpowder Plot. Read about references to this day in literature.

Labor Day in Literature
Labor Day is a U.S. holiday. The day is observed on the first Monday of September. Read more about Labor Day and labor in literature.

National Book Festival
National Book Festival is an annual event, which takes place on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

National Book Month
Classic Literature.

Prince and the Pauper - Mark Twain
The Prince and the Pauper is an American novel by Mark Twain. This work of historical fiction was first published in 1881 (Canada), and then published in 1882 (US).

Spy - James Fenimore Cooper
The Spy is a novel by James Fenimore Cooper, famous American writer. The book was Cooper's second novel, published in 1821.

Andersonville - MacKinlay Kantor
Andersonville (1955) is a controversial book by MacKinlay Kantor. Set during the Civil Ware, the novel is about a Confederate prisoner of war camp. The book was also awarded the Pulitzer Prize.

Hawaiian Literature - Classic Literature
The history of Hawaiian literature includes island adventures, nautical South Sea tales, mythology, and much more. Find stories, myths, novels, essays, and so much more.

Missouri Literature - Classic Literature
Lewis and Clark wrote about Missouri in 1804. Since then, many of our greatest American writers have been born there, including Mark Twain, T.S. Eliot, Maya Angelou, and Marianne Moore. Other writers like Tennessee Williams and William Wells Brown lived in Missouri for some time.

17th Century Literary Criticism
This page provides information and details related to Classic Literature. Specifically, you'll find facts about 17th-century literary criticism, which covers the works of Aphra Behn, George Herbert, and John Bunyan--to name a few.

18th Century Literary Criticism - Classic Literature
The 18th century was a time of Restoration, with writers like Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Cleland, Thomas Chatterton, and others. Read about literary theory, as it relates to 18th-century literature.

Existentialism - Literary Theory - Classic Literature
Existentialism involves the attempt to make meaning in a chaotic world. Sartre argued,

Gender Theory - Literary Theory and Criticism - Literature
Gender theory explores sexuality and difference in gender discussions, as they relate to literary theory.

Men's Studies and Men's Movement
Find information and resources related to Men's Studies and Men's Movement.

Creation
Creation stories exist in every culture and civilization around the world. Read about how different religions and cultures believe the world was created.

The Flood
Flood myths and stories are present in many of the world's myths. The Genesis flood story of Noah and The Epic of Gilgamesh are several of the most famous flood myths.

Love Poetry
Classic Literature.

All the King's Men - Robert Penn Warren
All the King's Men is a novel by Robert Penn Warren. First published in 1946, the book was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. All the King's Men was then adapted into a movie, which was awarded an Academy Award in 1949.

Animal Farm - George Orwell
Animal Farm is a novel by George Orwell. The work was published in 1945. In Animal Farm, the farm animals overthrow the humans.

Artist of the Beautiful - Nathaniel Hawthorne
The Artist of the Beautiful was first published in 1844 by Nathaniel Hawthorne. It's an allegorical short story, about Owen Warland.

Aurora Leigh - Elizabeth Barrett Browning
Aurora Leigh (1856), by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, is an epic about the development of a woman poet.

Al Aaraaf - Edgar Allan Poe


The Ambassadors - Henry James
The Ambassadors, by Henry James, was published in 1903. It is work of psychological realism.

Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina is one of Leo Tolstoy's most famous works.

Antigone - Sophocles
Antigone was a Greek tragedy, written by Sophocles c. 442 BC. Read more about the play.

Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Mark Twain
The Adventure of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain, appeared in England in June 1876, and six months later in the United States. Tom Sawyer's tale is set around 1845.

Bartleby the Scrivener - Herman Melville
Bartleby the Scrivener is a short story, written by Herman Melville in 1853. The story was published in Putnam's Magazine.

The Bhagavad-Gita
The Bhagavad-Gita is a sacred Sanskrit text, revered in the Hindu tradition. The work is comprised of 700 verses.

Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath
The Bell Jar is the famous autobiographical novel by Sylvia Plath.

Beowulf - Anglo-Saxon Literature
Beowulf is the most imposing folk-epic in Anglo-Saxon Literature. With a Germanic setting, Beowulf is probably the best known work in Old English.

Bleak House - Charles Dickens
Bleak House, by Charles Dickens, was first published between March 1852 and September 1853, with the first complete edition published in 1853. Read more about Bleak House.

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof - Tennessee Williams
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is a play, by Tennessee Williams. The play is a tragedy first published in 1940.

Common Sense - Thomas Paine
Common Sense is a political pamphlet by Thomas Paine. The work was first published in 1776.

Country Wife - William Wycherly
The Country Wife (1675) was written by William Wycherly in 1675. Meet Horner, Quack, Mr. and Mrs. Pinchwife, Alithea, Sparkish, and Harcourt--all characters in this bawdy Restoration Comedy play.

The Crucible (1953) Arthur Miller
The Crucible is a tragedy and allegory, written by Arthur Miller. The play was published in 1953, but it was set in 1692 in the time of the Salem witch trials.

The Canterbury Tales - Geoffrey Chaucer
The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1340-1400) is sometimes considered the first collection of short stories in English. The entire collection was probably written between the years 1387 and 1400.

Casey at the Bat - Ernest Lawrence Thayer
Ernest Lawrence Thayer (1863-1940) initially published Casey at the Bat in the San Francisco Examiner under the name Phin.

Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens
Published on December 17, 1843, A Christmas Carol has been adapted to film more than 200 times. The book is probably more popular than any other work by Charles Dickens.

Comedy of Errors - William Shakespeare
The Comedy of Errors may have first appeared on the stage in 1594. It appears that William Shakespeare drew from Menaechmi for the play.

The Defense - Vladimir Nabokov
The Defense is the third novel written by Vladimir Nabokov. The book tells a tale of Luzhin, who becomes a grandmaster in chess. Read about the obsession and madness.

The Death of Ivan Ilyich - Leo Tolstoy
The Death of Ivan Ilyich is a classic novella by Leo Tolstoy. The work was first published in 1886. The Death of Ivan Ilyich is often considered one of the quintessential depictions of death and dying.

The Devil and Tom Walker - Washington Irving
The Devil and Tom Walker (1824), by Washington Irving, was published as part of his short story collection, Tales of a Traveller. The narrator is Gentleman Geoffrey Crayon, and the story has been compared to Goethe's Faust, which is about a scholar who made a deal with the devil.

Doll's House - Henrik Ibsen
A Doll's House, by Henrik Ibsen, was published in 1879. The play delves into the realm of realism with Ibsen's concern for women's rights. The play has been compared with Kate Chopin's novel, The Awakening.

Don Juan - Lord Byron - British Literature
Don Juan is a satiric poem, written by British poet Lord Byron (1788-1824). He wrote the poem between 1818-1819 and dedicated it to Robert Southey (who was Poet Laureate). The legend surrounding the character of Don Juan extends beyond Byron's poem.

Dracula - Bram Stoker
Dracula was a novel written by Irish writer Bram Stoker. The book first appeared in 1897.

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Robert Louis Stevenson
Robert Louis Stevenson created Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in 1885 from a particularly striking nightmare. Famously, Stevenson threw the first version into the fire after his wife read it. He rewrote the book in three days.

Death Be Not Proud - John Gunther
Death Be Not Proud is a famous memoir by John Gunther, who wrote the book in memory of his son.

An Essay on Criticism - Alexander Pope


Evangeline - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Evangeline is an epic poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. The poem was written in 1847. Read more about this poem by the famous 19th century American poet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury
Fahrenheit 451 is a novel by Ray Bradbury. The science fiction novel was first published in 1953.

Faust - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Faust was written by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe--beginning in 1775--with two part. A work of German Romanticism--with a happy ending--Faust took Goethe 26 years to complete.

For Whom the Bell Tolls - Ernest Hemingway
For Whom the Bell Tolls was first published on October 21, 1940 by Scribner's. This novel by Ernest Hemingway is a war novel that centers around Robert Jordan, with an anonymous third-person narrator.

Fra Lippo Lippi - Robert Browning - British writer - Classic Literature
Robert Browning (British poet) wrote Fra Lippo Lippi in 1855. Like My Last Duchess, this poem is a dramatic monologue. In blank verse, Fra Lippo Lippi is based on a 15th-century Florentine monk-painter.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is an alliterative romance, written in the 14th century. J.R.R. Tolkien and E.V. Gordon published a modern edition of the poem in 1925.

Gimbel the Fool - Isaac Bashevis Singer
Gimbel the Fool is a famous short story by award-winning writer Isaac Bashevis Singer.

Finnegans Wake - James Joyce (1822-1941) Irish Writer.
Finnegans Wake is one of the most memorable works by James Joyce. Joyce is also known for Dubliners, for A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Ulysses.

Gift of the Magi - O. Henry
The Gift of the Magi, by O. Henry is a Christmas classic about sacrifice and love. Read more about this work.

Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
Grapes of Wrath is a novel by John Steinbeck. This classic was first published in 1939, and it has since been a popular text in American literature and history classrooms.

Gulliver's Travels - Jonathan Swift
Gulliver's Travels is one of Jonathan Swift's most famous work. The book was published in 1726.

Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad
Heart of Darkness (1899) was first serialized in Blackwood's Magazine. Now considered the most famous work by Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness is drawn from the author's experience in the Congo.

Hedda Gabler - Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906)
Compared to Ibsen's earlier plays--A Doll's House, Ghosts, and An Enemy of the People--Hedda Gabler was different. In this play, we find some of Ibsen's most memorable prose in a tragic interplay of psychoscape and linguistic drama.

Hobbit - J.R.R. Tolkien
The Hobbit is a fantasy novel by J.R.R. Tolkien. Published in 1937, this book introduced the world to Tolkien's Middle-Earth fantasy world, which he would later embellish upon with The Lord of the Rings trilogy.

How the Grinch Stole Christmas! - Dr. Seuss
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! is a famous story by Dr. Seuss. This children's book is about The Grinch, who lives on Mount Crumpit and wants to ruin Christmas for the inhabitants of Whoville.

In Cold Blood - Truman Capote
In Cold Blood, by Truman Capote, reconstructs the 1959 murder of a Kansas farm family. Read more about this Truman Capote classic.

Invisible Man - Ralph Ellison
Invisible Man is a novel by Ralph Ellison (the only one he published in his lifetime). Ellison received the National Book Award for this book in 1953, and it's considered on of the greatest American classics of the period.

The Jungle - Upton Sinclair
Published in 1906, Upton Sinclair's The Jungle is a classic in social protest literature.

The Little Mermaid