Databases Sitemap - Page 3 2016-09-26

Sample Excel Document for Pivot Tables
This sample Excel document contains student course registration data for use in generating pivot tables. It should be used in conjunction with the Creating Pivot Tables in Excel 2010 tutorial found on this site.

BASE Model of Database Development
The BASE model offers a completely different alternative to our traditional notions of database engineering. It abandons the relational database guiding principles of atomicity, consistency, isolation and durability in favor of a relaxed approach that allows the flexible, efficient storage of data.

Migrating to SQL Server with the Access Upsizing Wizard
Many database users begin their adventure in the world of databases by creating a Microsoft Access database that meets the basic requirements of their organizations. Often, this is a dramatic improvement from an unwieldy collection of spreadsheets, text files or other documents that the organization previously used to manage information. However, eventually the business may outgrow that Access database and need to make the move to a more advanced database product.

MySQL in Amazon Web Services (AWS) Free Tier
If you're seeking an inexpensive way to run a MySQL database in the cloud, you might want to consider using the free tier of Amazon Web Services. AWS offers free limited use of a MySQL database server for one year and is extremely easy to get up and running.

SQL Server Resource Governor
SQL Server’s Resource Governor feature, first available in SQL Server 2008, provides the ability to limit the resources consumed by SQL Server database connections. This functionality permits database administrators to regulate the CPU usage and memory consumption of various workloads.

Access 2013 Reports
Microsoft Access 2013 allows you to easily create professionally formatted reports automatically from information stored in a database. In tis tutorial, we're going to design a nicely-formatted listing of employee home telephone numbers for the use of management using the Northwind sample database and Access 2013.

Declarative Management Framework (DMF) in SQL Server 2008
SQL Server’s Declarative Management Framework (DMF) allows you to proactively regulate the configuration and operation of your SQL Server databases. You may declare security and best practice policies and then apply them to your database server.

ColdFusion Database Programming
The Net's best collection of ColdFusion links from your About.com Guide to Databases.

Database Organizations
Links to local and national database user organizations like the ACM SIGMOD, Oracle User Group and more!

Postgres and Ingres Databases
Postgres and INGRES are open-source database products brought to us by the database research group at UC Berekely. These links provide the best resources on the Net!

How To Install Microsoft Access 2007
Due to its widespread availability and flexible functionality, Microsoft Access is arguably the most popular database software in use today. In this

How To Install Microsoft Access 2010
Due to its widespread availability and flexible functionality, Microsoft Access is arguably the most popular database software in use today. In this

How to Print Mailing Labels in Microsoft Access 2010
One of the most common uses of a database is generating mass mailings. In this tutorial, we examine the process of creating mailing labels using Microsoft Access 2010 using the built-in Label Wizard. We begin with a database containing the address data and walk you step-by-step through the process of creating and printing your mailing labels.

Backing up an Access 2010 Database
I've often been asked

Open the Database
Start Microsoft Access 2010 and open the database that you would like to backup. Page 2.

Close all database objects
Protecting the integrity of information stored in a database is one of the most important responsibilities of a database administrator. One task associated with this responsibility is performing regular database backups. In this tutorial, we'll walk through the process of backing up your Access 2010 database using the software's built-in backup functionality. Page 3.

Select "Save Database As"
Protecting the integrity of information stored in a database is one of the most important responsibilities of a database administrator. One task associated with this responsibility is performing regular database backups. In this tutorial, we'll walk through the process of backing up your Access 2010 database using the software's built-in backup functionality. Page 4.

Choose a Backup File Name
Protecting the integrity of information stored in a database is one of the most important responsibilities of a database administrator. One task associated with this responsibility is performing regular database backups. In this tutorial, we'll walk through the process of backing up your Access 2010 database using the software's built-in backup functionality. Page 5.

Click the Save Button
Protecting the integrity of information stored in a database is one of the most important responsibilities of a database administrator. One task associated with this responsibility is performing regular database backups. In this tutorial, we'll walk through the process of backing up your Access 2010 database using the software's built-in backup functionality. Page 6.

Using Expression Builder in Microsoft Access 2010
Have trouble remembering function names or arguments in Microsoft Access? We all do! Access' Expression Builder is a great tool that walks you through the process of creating expressions for your forms, tables, reports and queries while keeping a handy reference at your fingertips.

Expand Expressions and Select a Subgroup
You will be able to build your expression by adding items to the empty window on top of the screen. You can choose from the row of standard operator buttons (such as +, -, =, And, Or, etc.) immediately below that window. The real power of Expression Builder, however, lies in the bottom portion of the screen -- the expression elements. Page 2.

Select a Function
Select a category (such as SQL Aggregate) in the middle pane. You may have to scroll down to view all of the categories. Then select a specific function (such as Count) from the rightmost pane. This is shown in the figure above. Page 3.

Fill in any required value(s)
You will now see the text Count(<>) in the top window. You still need to add an expression informing Access of what you'd like to count. Page 4.

Finish the Expression
Finally, we need to finish our expression with a bit of SQL. We wanted to count only those items with an Apple attribute value of

Expand an Expression Folder and Select a Subfolder
You will be able to build your expression by adding items to the empty window on top of the screen. You can choose from the row of standard operator buttons (such as +, -, =, And, Or, etc.) immediately below that window. The real power of Expression Builder, however, lies in the bottom portion of the screen -- the expression elements. Page 2.

Select a Function
Select a category (such as SQL Aggregate) in the middle pane. You may have to scroll down to view all of the categories. Then select a specific function (such as Count) from the rightmost pane. This is shown in the figure above. Page 3.

Fill in any required value(s)
You will now see the text Count(<>) in the top window. You still need to add an expression informing Access of what you'd like to count. Page 4.

Finish the Expression
Finally, we need to finish our expression with a bit of SQL. We wanted to count only those items with an Apple attribute value of

Using Expression Builder in Microsoft Access 2007
Have trouble remembering function names or arguments in Microsoft Access? We all do! Access' Expression Builder is a great tool that walks you through the process of creating expressions for your forms, tables, reports and queries while keeping a handy reference at your fingertips.

Backing up an Access 2003 Database
I've often been asked

Open the Database
I've often been asked

Close all database objects
I've often been asked

Select Back Up Database
I've often been asked

Choose a Backup File Name
I've often been asked

Click the Save Button
I've often been asked

Create a Microsoft Access Database Using a Template
Microsoft provides quite a few prebuilt database templates to assist you in jumpstarting your database development process. In this tutorial, we'll walk through the process of creating an Access database using these templates.

Access 2010 Tour: The User Interface
If you're switching to Microsoft Access 2010 from an earlier version, you're bound to immediately notice some changes. If you've been using Access 2007, the ribbon-based user interface will look similar, but it's received a facelift. If you're switching from an earlier version, you'll discover that the way you work with Access is now entirely different!

Database Design from the Ground Up
In this course, we explore the basics of database design. Ten weekly lessons each explore a different issue in database design, culminating in a final case study.

Reporting
Once you have information stored in your database, it sure would be nice to get it back out again! Part X of our Building an Access Database from the Ground Up series explains how to use reports to retrieve information from your database.

Building the Relational Model
In Part IV of our

k-means Clustering: Data Mining with k-means
k-means clustering is a data mining/machine learning algorithm used to cluster observations into groups of related observations without any prior knowledge of those relationships. The k-means algorithm is one of the simplest clustering techniques and it is commonly used in medical imaging, biometrics and related fields.

Microsoft ActiveX Data Objects (ADO)
Microsoft ActiveX Data Objects (ADO) offer programmers a quick, easy way to access diverse data sources programatically.

Encrypting Access Databases
Security-conscious database users have long called for the ability to use strong encryption in Microsoft Access. With the release of Access 2007, Microsoft answered these pleas and introduced a robust encryption feature that allows for the simple addition of a great deal of security to Access databases.

SQL Injection Attacks on Databases
One common type of database attack, the SQL Injection, allows a malicious individual to execute arbitrary SQL code on your server. Let's take a look at how it works by analyzing a very simple web application that processes customer orders.

Microsoft Access Function Library: IsEmpty()
The IsEmpty function returns a value of true if the referenced variable has not been initialized. Otherwise, it returns false.

Microsoft Access Function Library: IsError()
The IsErrorfunction returns a value of true if evaluating the expression results in an error value. Otherwise, it returns false.

Microsoft Access Function Library: Hex()
The Hex() function converts a whole number into a string containing its hexadecimal representation.

Microsoft Access Function Library: DateAdd()
The DateAdd() function allows you to increment a date by a chosen interval.

Microsoft Access Function Library: DateDiff()
The DateDiff() function returns the difference between two dates.

Microsoft Access Function Library: DatePart()
The DatePart() function returns the requested piece of a date.

Database Certification Spotlight: OCA
Want to prove your Oracle Database Administration prowess to the world? Check out the Oracle 11g certification program!

Introduction to Microsoft SQL Server 2000
SQL Server offers full-featured relational database functionality in a user-oriented package. Learn about the various components of SQL Server in this article.

SQL Server Backup Types and Scopes
One of the major advantages that enterprise-class databases offer over their desktop counterparts is a robust backup and recovery feature set. Microsoft SQL Server provides database administrators with the ability to customize a database backup and recovery plan to the business and technical requirements of an organization.

Introduction to Microsoft SQL Server 2005
The long awaited Yukon is almost here! Microsoft plans to release SQL Server 2005 later this year and has packed the new database engine full of features.

SQL Server Constraints
SQL Server constraints allow you to enforce rules in your database. These rules may affect business logic, database integrity and/or table structures. Each one plays an important role in your database architecture.

DEFAULT Constraints in Microsoft SQL Server
DEFAULT constraints allow you to specify a value that the database will use to populate fields that are left blank in the input source.

SQL Server Data Types
Selecting appropriate data types is one of the most important considerations when designing a SQL Server database. Choices you make in the database design phase may have a significant impact on the efficiency, performance and storage requirements of your database down the road.

CHECK Constraints in Microsoft SQL Server 2008
CHECK constraints allow you to limit the types of data that users may insert in a database. They go beyond data types and allow you to define the specific values that may be included in a column.

Create a Blank Access Database
Next, you'll need to create a blank database to use as your starting point. Click

Name Your Access Database
In the next step, the right pane of the Getting Started window will change to match the image above. Give your database a name by typing it into the text box and click the Create button to begin building your database. Page 3.

Add Tables To Your Access Database
Access will now present you with a spreadsheet-style interface, shown in the image above, that helps you create your database tables. Page 4.

Open Microsoft Access to the Getting Started Screen
Once you've selected a template, open Microsoft Access. If you already have Access open, close and restart the program so you're viewing the Getting Started screen, as shown in the image above. This will be our starting point for creating our database. Page 2.

Select the Template Source
Next, choose the source of your template from the left pane, as shown in the image above. If you wish to use a template on your local system, click

Click the Template You Selected
After you select a template source, the right window pane will show all of the templates available from that source. Click once on the template you'd like to use to begin the database creation process. Page 4.

Choose a Database Name
After you select a database template, a new pane will appear in the right portion of the screen, as shown in the image above. You must now name your Access database. You may either use the name suggested by Access or type in your own name. If you'd like to change the database location from the default, click the file folder icon to navigate through the directory structure. Page 5.

Begin Working With Your Database
That's all there is to it! After a brief delay, Access will open your new database, as shown in the image above. You can either begin entering data immediately by typing in the first open cell or you can explore the features of the template using the navigation pane on the left side of the screen. Page 6.

Getting Started Page
The new Getting Started page provides you with a quick shortcut to the features of Access 2007. The most notable feature on this page is the prominent set of dymanic links to Microsoft's Access 2007 templates. These are updated automatically through Office Online and offer you the ability to begin your database with a predefined template, rather than starting from a blank database. Examples include databases for asset tracking, project management, sales, issues, events and students. Page 2.

The Microsoft Office Button
The Microsoft Office button, shown in the image above, is your key to accessing (pun intended!) resources. Clicking this button brings up a tree-based menu containing all of the functions currently available to you. These include creating a new database, opening an existing database, saving your work, printing and other functions. Page 3.

The Ribbon
The Ribbon is the biggest change in Access 2007 and the Office 2007 suite. It replaces the familiar drop-down menus (remember

Command Tabs
The command tabs help you navigate through the Ribbon by choosing the high-level task that you'd like to perform. For example, the Ribbon shown above has the Create command tab selected. The Home, External Data and Database Tools command tabs always appear at the top of the Ribbon. You'll also see context-sensitive tabs, such as the Datasheet tab in the example above. Page 5.

Quick Access Toolbar
The Quick Access Toolbar (shown in the image above) appears at the top of the Access window and provides you with one-click shortcuts to commonly used functions. You may customize the contents of the toolbar by clicking the arrow icon immediately to the right of the toolbar. By default, the Quick Access Toolbar contains buttons for Save, Undo and Redo. You may customize the toolbar by adding icons for New, Open, E-mail, Print, Print Preview, Spelling, Mode, Refresh All and other functions. Page 6.

Navigation Pane
The Navigation Pane (shown above) provides you with access to all of the objects in your database. You may customize the contents of the Navigation Pane by using the expandable/collapsable subpanes. Page 7.

Tabbed Documents
Access 2007 incorporates the popular tabbed document browsing feature found in Internet Explorer 7. As shown in the image above, Access provides you with tabs representig each of your open database objects. You may quickly switch between open objects by clicking on the corresponding tab. Page 8.

Getting Started Page
The most notable feature on this page is the prominent set of dynamic links to Microsoft's Access 2007 templates. These are updated automatically through Office Online and offer you the ability to begin your database design with a predefined template, rather than starting from a blank database. Examples include databases for asset tracking, project management, sales, tasks, contacts, issues, events and students. Page 2.

The File Tab
Fans of the old File menu have something to celebrate in Access 2010 - it's back! (Well, kind of!) The Microsoft Office button is now gone and has been replaced with a File tab on the Ribbon. When you select this tab, a new window appears down the left side of the screen with many of the functions found on the old File menu. Page 4.

Command Tabs
The command tabs help you navigate through the Ribbon by choosing the high-level task that you'd like to perform. For example, the Ribbon shown above has the Create command tab selected. The Home, External Data and Database Tools command tabs always appear at the top of the Ribbon. You'll also see context-sensitive tabs, such as the Datasheet tab in the example above. Page 5.

Quick Access Toolbar
The Quick Access Toolbar (shown in the image above) appears at the top of the Access window and provides you with one-click shortcuts to commonly used functions. You may customize the contents of the toolbar by clicking the arrow icon immediately to the right of the toolbar. By default, the Quick Access Toolbar contains buttons for Save, Undo and Redo. You may customize the toolbar by adding icons for New, Open, E-mail, Print, Print Preview, Spelling, Mode, Refresh All and other functions. Page 6.

Navigation Pane
The Navigation Pane (shown above) provides you with access to all of the objects in your database. You may customize the contents of the Navigation Pane by using the expandable/collapsable subpanes. Page 7.

Tabbed Documents
Access 2010 incorporates the popular tabbed document browsing feature found in Internet Explorer 7. As shown in the image above, Access provides you with tabs representig each of your open database objects. You may quickly switch between open objects by clicking on the corresponding tab. Page 8.

The Ribbon
The Ribbon, introduced in Office 2007, is the biggest change for users of earlier versions of Access. It replaces the familiar drop-down menus (remember

Show or Hide Tabs in Microsoft Access 2007
Access 2007 introduces the tabbed document format found in other Microsoft Office products. In some cases, you may wish to hide these tabs to change the look and feel of your database or more closely simulate the appearance of older versions of Access.

How to Create a Report Snapshot in Microsoft Access
Report snapshots offer a portable format that can be used to view Access reports on systems that don't have Microsoft Access installed. It's available for most versions of Windows and allows you to share reports via e-mail, the web or automated processes.

Start the Relationships Tool
Next, you'll need to open the Access Relationships Tool. Begin by selecting the Database Tools tab on the Access ribbon. Then click the Relationships button, as shown in the image above. Page 2.

Add the Related Tables
If this is the first relationship you've created in the current database, the Show Tables dialog box will appear, as shown in the image above. Page 3.

View the Relationship Diagram
You'll now see the blank relationship diagram, as shown in the image above. Notice that there are no lines joining the tables; this indicates that you do not yet have any relationships between those tables. In our example, we'll be creating a relationship between the Routes table and the Runs table. As you can see above, we've added both of those tables to the diagram. Page 4.

Create the Relationship Between the Tables
It's showtime! In this step, we create the relationship between the two tables. Page 5.

View the Completed Relationships Diagram
Finally, review the completed relationships diagram to ensure that it correctly depicts your desired relationship. Page 6.

Microsoft Access User-Level Security Tutorial
If youre a Microsoft Office power user, you might be familiar with the encryption features of Word, PowerPoint and Excel. These programs all allow file owners to easily apply encryption. Unfortunately, Microsoft Access doesnt offer similar functionality, but it still has relatively powerful security functionality. In this article, well take a look at Microsoft Access user-level security, a feature that lets you specify the level of access to grant each individual user of your database.

Creating a New Workgroup Information File
Creating a New Workgroup Information File. Page 2.

Providing a Name and Workgroup ID
Providing a Name and Workgroup ID. Page 3.

Selecting the Security Scope
Selecting the Security Scope. Databases. Page 4.

Selecting User Groups
Selecting User Groups. Databases. Page 5.

Permissions for the Users Group
Permissions for the Users Group. Databases. Page 6.

Adding Users
Adding Users. Databases. Page 7.

Assigning Users to Groups
Assigning Users to Groups. Databases. Page 8.

Creating a Backup
Creating a Backup. Databases. Page 9.

Collecting Information for an Access Database by E-mail
Microsoft Access allows you to collect information from individuals and update your database automatically based upon their replies. Access includes a wizard designed to facilitate this task. In this tutorial, we walk through the process of populating an Access table with user-provided information.

Choose an HTML form for your message
Access 2007 supports two types of form: HTML forms and InfoPath forms. Generally speaking, you'll want to use an HTML form because almost any e-mail user can read and use this type of form. InfoPath forms, on the other hand, require that all users have both Microsoft Office Outlook 2007 and Microsoft Office InfoPath 2007 installed on their systems. Click the radio button next to the HTML form option and click the Next button to continue. Page 2.

Choose to collect new data or update existing data
Office forms provide two data collection options: Collect new information from users that adds new records to your database Update existing data in your database. This option is useful if you wish to send recipients an e-mail message providing them with their current information and allowing them to make corrections. In this example, I'm asking users to add new records to a database, so I'll choose the

Select the fields you wish to collect
In the next wizard screen (shown above), you'll see a listing of available fields. Use the arrow buttons to move the fields you wish to collect from the left side of the window to the right side. If you wish to use the existing field name in the form, you do not need to make any changes. However, if you wish to use a user-friendly name, you may provide it in the

Automatically process e-mail replies in your database
On the next screen, you may choose to have Access automatically read e-mail replies and update your database accordingly. Simply check the box marked

Choose e-mail recipients
The next screen of the wizard asks you to select the way you will identify e-mail recipients. Your first option is to manually enter the addresses in Outlook. Obviously, that's not practical for a large database. I recommend using the second option whenever possible: using e-mail addresses stored in the database table. Click the

Customize the e-mail message
In the next step, you'll be able to provide a customized e-mail message designed to provide your recipients with introductory information. You may customize the e-mail subject, the introductory text and the field where you include the recipient's address. Page 7.

Send the e-mail message
Finally, you may review the list of recipients, as shown above, and remove individual recipients by unchecking the box to the right of their e-mail addresses. After reviewing the recipient list, click the Send button to send your message. Page 8.

Review the message
After clicking the Send button, Access will automatically send your messages using Outlook. An example form appears above. When users fill out your form, Outlook will automatically send the replies to Access, which will use them to automatically update your database. Page 9.

Select the Pages tab
Want to design a Data Access Page using Access 2000? This step-by-step tutorial walks you through the process. Page 2.

Start the Data Access Page wizard
Want to design a Data Access Page using Access 2000? This step-by-step tutorial walks you through the process. Page 3.

Select the desired data source.
Want to design a Data Access Page using Access 2000? This step-by-step tutorial walks you through the process. Page 4.

Select the fields to include.
Want to design a Data Access Page using Access 2000? This step-by-step tutorial walks you through the process. Page 5.

Choose any desired grouping levels
Want to design a Data Access Page using Access 2000? This step-by-step tutorial walks you through the process. Page 6.

Select the sort order
Want to design a Data Access Page using Access 2000? This step-by-step tutorial walks you through the process. Page 7.

Give the page a title
Want to design a Data Access Page using Access 2000? This step-by-step tutorial walks you through the process. Page 8.

Review the Finished Product
Want to design a Data Access Page using Access 2000? This step-by-step tutorial walks you through the process. Page 9.

Creating a Publication in SQL Server
Once you've created a published/distributor, you can then use SQL Server Management Studio to create publications that subscribing servers may receive. Each publication contains a collection of database objects that will be replicated to all subscriber servers. Page 2.

Creating a Publication in SQL Server
Once you've created a published/distributor, you can then use SQL Server Management Studio to create publications that subscribing servers may receive. Each publication contains a collection of database objects that will be replicated to all subscriber servers. Page 3.

Creating a Publication in SQL Server
Once you've created a published/distributor, you can then use SQL Server Management Studio to create publications that subscribing servers may receive. Each publication contains a collection of database objects that will be replicated to all subscriber servers. Page 4.

Creating a Publication in SQL Server
Once you've created a published/distributor, you can then use SQL Server Management Studio to create publications that subscribing servers may receive. Each publication contains a collection of database objects that will be replicated to all subscriber servers. Page 5.

Creating a Publication in SQL Server
Once you've created a published/distributor, you can then use SQL Server Management Studio to create publications that subscribing servers may receive. Each publication contains a collection of database objects that will be replicated to all subscriber servers. Page 6.

Starting the Database Maintenance Plan Wizard
Starting the Database Maintenance Plan Wizard. Page 2.

Name the Database Maintenance Plan
Name the Database Maintenance Plan. Page 3.

Schedule your Database Maintenance Plan
Schedule your Database Maintenance Plan. Page 4.

Select the Tasks for your Maintenance Plan
Select the Tasks for your Maintenance Plan. Page 5.

Ordering the Tasks in the Database Maintenance Plan
Ordering the Tasks in the Database Maintenance Plan. Page 6.

Configure the Plan's Task Details
Configure the Plan's Task Details. Page 7.

Choose Maintenance Plan Reporting Options
Choose Maintenance Plan Reporting Options. Page 8.

MySQL
What is MySQL? Find out here! Databases.

Data
What is data? Find out here! Databases.

10 Time-Saving Tips for Microsoft Access 2007
Looking to shave some time off your daily Microsoft Access administration and design tasks? There are many great, little-known features of this program that you can use to improve the efficiency of your database experience. I've put together a collection of ten tips that will improve your Microsoft Access experience.

Time-Saving Tips for Microsoft Access 2010
Looking to shave some time off your daily Microsoft Access administration and design tasks? There are many great, little-known features of this program that you can use to improve the efficiency of your database experience. I've put together a collection of ten tips that will improve your Microsoft Access experience.

How to Change the Default Database Format in Access 2010
Access 2010 uses the ACCDB format by default. In this article, we walk you through the process of changing this default setting for newly created databases.

Subscribing to a SQL Server Publication
Once you've configured a distributor and created a publication, the last step in configuring SQL Server replication is to create a subscriber who will receive publication updates from the publisher. In this tutorial, we walk through the process of subscribing to a publication, step-by-step.

Database Engine Tuning Advisor (DETA): Tuning Your SQL Server Database
Database Engine Tuning Advisor (DETA) allows you to optimize your SQL Server database configuration based upon the unique business requirements of your organization. It analyzes your database workload and uses that information to make recommendations about hte physical structure of your database and then allows you to actually implement the recommendations within DETA.

Snapshot Replication: Creating a Distributor in SQL Server 2008 for use with Snapshot Replication
SQL Server's snapshot replication technology allows you to automatically transfer information between databases to keep them synchronized. In this article, we look at the first step of the snapshot replication process: creating the replication distributor.

How to Create a DMF Policy
Policy objects specify the conditions you wish to enforce against database targets using the Distributed Management Framework (DMF). In this tutorial, we create a DMF policy that enforces the stored procedure naming convention condition we created together in the previous step.

Configuring Log Shipping in SQL Server 2008
Log shipping allows you to keep two SQL Server databases synchronized for high availability. In a log shipping relationship, the primary server transfers copies of its transaction logs to the secondary server on a periodic basis. The secondary server receives those logs and uses them to update its copy of the database so that it is then in the same state as the database on the primary server.

Microsoft SQL Server Database Maintenance Plans
Database Maintenance Plans allow you to automate many database administration tasks in Microsoft SQL Server. You can create maintenance plans using an easy wizard-based process without any knowledge of Transact-SQL.

Access 2007 Tour: The New User Interface
If youre switching to Microsoft Access 2007 from an earlier version, youre bound to immediately notice some major changes in the user interface. Microsoft modeled the Access 2007 look-and-feel after the Windows Vista model, providing the application with a clean, high-tech look that could dramatically alter your workflow. In this article, we walk through the new interface. Well explore the Ribbon, the Microsoft Office button, the Navigation Pane and other features of Access 2007.

Sybase
The Net’s best collection of Sybase database product links from your About.com Guide to Databases.

SQL Server
What is SQL Server? Find out here!

FileMaker Pro
What is FileMaker Pro? Find out here!

Expert Oracle
Review of Thomas Kyte's Expert One-on-One Oracle from Wrox Press

Postgres Definition
What is Postgres? Find out here!

Fourth Normal Form (4NF)
What is Fourth Normal Form? Find out here!

Database Consistency
What is Consistency? Find out here!

Form
What is a database form? Find out here!

Database Normalization
What is database normalization? Find out here!

Record Definition
What is a database record? Find out here!

Row Definition
What is a database row? Find out here!

Replication Definition
What is database replication? Find out here!

Report Definition
What is a database report? Find out here!

Repository Definition
What is a repository? Find out here!

Data Mining
What is data mining? Find out here!

Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) Definition
What is Open Database Connectivity (ODBC)? Find out here!

Online Transaction Processing (OLTP) Definition
What is Online Transaction Processing (OLTP)? Find out here!

Classification (Data Mining) Definition
What is classification? Learn about this data mining term here.

Regression (Data Mining) Definition
What is regression? Learn more about this data mining term here.

PL/SQL
What is PL/SQL? Find out in the About Databases glossary!

ACCDB File Format
The ACCDB database file format was introduced with the release of Microsoft Access 2007 to replace the older MDB file format. The use of ACCDB format allows users to leverage enhanced functionality in Access, including the use of multivalued fields and strong cryptography.

Database Concurrency
Looking for a definition of database concurrency? Find it here!

Designing Data Access Pages
Want to design a Data Access Page using Access 2000? This step-by-step tutorial walks you through the process.

Creating a Publication in SQL Server
Once you've created a published/distributor, you can then use SQL Server Management Studio to create publications that subscribing servers may receive. Each publication contains a collection of database objects that will be replicated to all subscriber servers.

Compound Key: About Databases Glossary Definition
What is a compound key? Find out in the About Databases glossary!

Default Values in Databases
Looking for a description of default values and constraints in databases? The About Databases Glossary provides an easy to understand description.

Many-to-Many Relationships in Databases
Looking for a definition of many-to-many database relationships? Read our definition in the About Databases glossary!

Learning SQL
The Structured Query Language (SQL) forms the backbone of all relational databases. This language offers a flexible interface for databases of all shapes and sizes and is used as the basis for all user and administrator interactions with the database.

Using Databases
Databases offer a powerful, flexible way to manage your organization's data. In this section, we explore several popular database platforms: Microsoft Access, Microsoft SQL Server and MySQL, providing you with the information you need to get started and develop your database skills.

Integrating Databases with the Web
The Net’s best collection of database web integration links from your About.com guide to Databases.

FoxPro Programming Language
The Net’s best collection of FoxPro links from your About.com Guide to Databases.