Death and Dying Sitemap - Page 4 2014-04-17

Myths and Realities about the Timing of Loss and Grief
People in Western society are socialized to believe certain things about the normal grief response; many of these are inaccurate and untrue. These common misconceptions and myths have become part of our cultural beliefs of the grieving process. This section explores the Myths and Realities about the Nature of Grief. This section explores the Myths and Realities about the Timing of Loss and Grief.

Myths and Realities about the Emotions and Physical Symptoms of Grief
People in Western society are socialized to believe certain things about the normal grief response; many of these are inaccurate and untrue. These common misconceptions and myths have become part of our cultural beliefs of the grieving process. This section explores the Myths and Realities about the Nature of Grief. This section explores the Myths and Realities about the Emotions and Physical Symptoms of Grief.

Myths and Realities about Ways of Coping with Grief
People in Western society are socialized to believe certain things about the normal grief response; many of these are inaccurate and untrue. These common misconceptions and myths have become part of our cultural beliefs of the grieving process. This section explores the Myths and Realities about the Nature of Grief. This section explores the Myths and Realities about Ways of Coping with Grief and inlcudes the resources utilized in this article.

Important Factors for Most People at the End of Life - Deciding What's Important at the End of Life
Steinhauser and her colleagues surveyed nearly 1500 to try and determine the different factors considered important to most people at the end of life. Those interviewed for the study included seriously ill patients, recently bereaved family, physicians, nurses, social workers, clergy members and hospice volunteers. This article presents all of the attributes that were considered to be important by more than 70% of all participants. Additionally the factors are grouped for clarity.

Common Groups of Important Factors for Most People at the End of Life - Findings about the Attributes
Steinhauser and her colleagues surveyed nearly 1500 to try and determine the different factors considered important to most people at the end of life. They determined 26 factors were considered to be important by more than 70% of all participants--patients, bereaved family members, physicians and other care providers. The factors or attributes were arranged into common groups for clarity.

Using the Factors Considered Important at the End of Life - Deciding What is Important to You at the End of Life
Steinhauser and her colleagues surveyed nearly 1500 to try and determine the different factors considered important to most people at the end of life. They determined 26 factors were considered to be important by more than 70% of all participants--patients, bereaved family members, physicians and other care providers. These factors can be used to help clarify for yourself and for your loved ones what is important for you personally at the end of life.

Components of a Good Death - In Search of a Good Death - Creating a Good Death
Despite the recent recognition of the importance of End-of-Life Care and need for quality care at the end of life, people and professional alike remain confuse about what is considered to be a good death. Steinhauser and colleagues gathered descriptions of a good death from seventy-five different participants and identified six major components of a good death. This article reviews those components.

Important Factors for Patients at the End of Life - Improving Care at the End of Life
Steinhauser and her colleagues surveyed nearly 1500 people in a study published in 2000 to determine the factors considered to be important to people at the end of life. This list includes those factors felt to be significant for patients, but were less important to their physicians.

The Kindness Project - A Way of Remembering a Loved One - A Legacy of Love
The Kindness Project is a way of remembering a loved one and creating a legacy of love in memory of someone who has died. A loved one is remembered by a random act of kindness in memory of the person who has died, as a way of letting others know that this person's life continues to matter.

Remember a Loved One with an Ornament We Remember You, Angel - Remembering at the Holidays
This photograph is of an grieving angel statue holding a pinkish-red rose. The text "We Remember You" has been superimposed on the photograph. Copyright vhc, the Violet Heart Collection, 2004.

Remembering Those Who Died Serving Their Country - Remembrance Day - Remembrance Sunday - Veterans Day
World War I ended on the 11th day of the 11th month at the 11th hour, November 11th, 1918 on Armistice Day. Different countries observe Remembrance Day, Remembrance Sunday or Veterans Day as ways of commemorating the end of World War I. Some countries, like Australia and Canada, honor those who died serving their country in November each year on Armistice Day or Remembrance Sunday, like Britain. The United States honors all of their Veterans in November and their war dead in May.

Remembering a Loved One with The Empty Chair Around The Holiday Table - Coping with Grief Over the Holidays
Rabbi Mel Glazer has written this informative article on Grief at the Holidays offering a unique way to remember a loved one and cope with the loss of a loved one during the holiday season. In this article, reprinted with his permission, Rabbi Glazer presents several suggestions for ways of keeping the memory of a loved one alive during the holidays.