About Experts Sitemap - Group 31 - Page 69 2016-09-20

Italian Language: meaning of "caldo", adjective, italians
adjective, italians, different things: Hi Rich, The best way to explain this would be that when referring to the weather, caldo means warm. It is generally understood that fa caldo refers to warmth. If the Italians wanted to emphasise this like we would in English to say it is hot or boiling,...

Italian Language: pasta, word pasta, american invention
word pasta, american invention, many different types: Rich, the word pasta is really a catch-all term for pastry or dough. Of course the most common understanding of this is the type of thing we have with some kind of sauce for lunch or dinner, i.e. noodles in all their forms. You can, however, also refer...

Italian Language: pronunciation, italian pronunciation, genitive
italian pronunciation, genitive, nice day: Hello, Here’s the correct Italian pronunciation of your last name: -AN is pronounced like the AN in “ANnouncement” where the A sounds like the A in “Germany” or the first A in “cApital”. -GE is pronounced like the GE in “GEnitive” -LO is pronounced...

Italian Language: santo, masculine and feminine nouns, masculine nouns
masculine and feminine nouns, masculine nouns, san zaccaria: Hi Rich, Yes it is true that santo has several forms when put before a noun. San is used for mascline nouns that begin with a consonant - e.g. San Francesco Santo is used for s plus consonants such as Santo Spirito Santa is used for feminine...

Italian Language: sono tre euro, correct translation, plural verb
correct translation, plural verb, learning italian: Hi Rich, The correct translation of sono tre euro would simply be something like that s 3 euros please just the same way that somebody may say that s 3 pounds in English. A waiter in Italy would definitely use this construction: it sounds very...

Italian Language: strada, corso, via, viale, guiseppe mazzini, emmanuale
guiseppe mazzini, emmanuale, alpine road: Hi Rich, Strada would be the equivalent road or street in English however you wouldn t see this written on a road sign like in English you would have Alpine Road for example. Instead, it is used in speaking in a general sense. E.g. Quella strada e...

Italian Language: Translation help, please :), tina tina, perche il mio amore
tina tina, perche il mio amore, accent mark: Tina, the choice is up to you--here are all three: 1. Perche il nostro amore e piu profondo delle ferite. 2. Perche il suo amore e piu profondo delle ferite. 3. Perche il mio amore e piu profondo delle ferite. Note that an apostrophe is...

Italian Language: translation, first person plural, singular pronoun
first person plural, singular pronoun, subject pronoun: Dear Rich, I am always glad to help you. So, you are correct in thinking that Italian does not include the word “it” when expressing the phrase: “ It is us.” In fact, the word “it” is used to introduce the sentence in English, but this would...

Italian Language: translation, napoli catania, universal quality
napoli catania, universal quality, ancient walls: Rich, it s pretty dry writing, and would take some thought and some liberty to render into any kind of pleasant style, but here is a serviceable, if somewhat literal translation: The historic center is a zoning definition which identifies in a city the...

Italian Language: un po', podi, adverbial expression
podi, adverbial expression, last question: Dear Rich, you are right: if someone said to you “Rich, hai fame?”, it would be correct to say “Sì, un po’” meaning “Yes, a little bit.” Moreover “un po’“ is still an adverbial expression. See for example: -“Questo è un po strano” (This...

Italian Language: un po'di, adjective phrase, indefinite adjective
adjective phrase, indefinite adjective, podi: Dear Rich, first of all I‘d like to tell you that I am very glad to answer your questions which show your great interest in studying Italian in depth. Therefore do not worry: you do not bother me! As for the expression “un po’di” as in the phrase “un...

Italian Language: understanding the expression - cosa c'e?, interrogative pronoun, colloquial expression
interrogative pronoun, colloquial expression, colloquial expressions: Dear Rich, the question clause “Cosa c’è?” / “Che cosa c’è” /”Che c’è?” means exactly “What s the matter?” or “What’s up?” which however can also correspond to “Che cosa succede?”/ ”Cosa succede?”/”Che succede?”. As for “What’s wrong?”/ “What’s...

Italian Language: use of "a", preposition, indirect object
preposition, indirect object, infinitive: Dear Rich, the preposition “a” is used before the word “casa” and before the verb “dormire” in the sentence “Devo andare a casa a dormire” (literally, I have to go home to sleep) simply because the first “a” is the preposition that expresses the motion...

Italian Language: use of, centisimi, euro coins
centisimi, euro coins, centesimo: Hi Rich, No, soldo simply means a coin. It doesn t specifically mean a cent - it can be of any currency. Anyway, it is very rarely used and it is much more common to hear it in its plural form of soldi to mean money. Hope this helps, Kind regards,...

Italian Language: use of definite article, common nouns, linea quattro
common nouns, linea quattro, definite article: Hi Rich, The answer simply is that in Italian you must define things a lot more than in English. If the definite article had not been used, then the line would have been referred to in a general way - it could mean any line at all but the use of la immediately...

Italian Language: follow up, linea quattro, italians in new york
linea quattro, italians in new york, italian lesson: Hi Rich, Yes ci is used with essere to mean here or there in a general sense but remember that it doesn t have to be single-handedly used with that verb. As seen in my examples before you can combine it with any other to be there. Non ce l ho trovato...

Italian Language: use of "macchiato", adjective, noun
adjective, noun, coffee: Dear Rich, macchiato is an adjective,meaning spotted,marked;stained with (for example,leopardo macchiato,cocorito maccchiato...) Caffè macchiato has such name because it s stained with milk.The milk on the top of the coffee leaves such marks that...

Italian Language: use of preposition "a", use of preposition, italian dictionary
use of preposition, italian dictionary, orange juice: Hi Rich, Aranciata is simply orange juice. Therefore the dictionary is basically stating that orange juice is a beverage containing the juice of an orange. Therefore the use of a base di is simply to mean containing in English. The preposition...

Italian Language: use of "Santo Spirito", santo spirito, spirito santo
santo spirito, spirito santo, holy spirit: Hi Rich, Yes, this is just a matter of exception. Although normally it would be placed after the verb, I imagine it is just to stay in keeping with the other churches as every other church has the santo article put before. It does still mean holy spirit...

Italian Language: use of "va bene cosi", biglietto aereo, divano
biglietto aereo, divano, question mark: Dear Rich, there is no great difference between “Va bene così?” and “Va bene?” that translate respectively as “OK?” and “Is that OK?”. Therefore you can say correctly “Va bene così?” as well as “Va bene?”. Anyway, if I really wanted to be meticulous,...

Italian Language: use of the word "caldo", hot one, jelena
hot one, jelena, adverb: Dear Rich, caldo can stand for warm as well as for hot.But you can use molto to emphasize both warm and hot .In Italian it doesn t make much difference,because they don t have that much words to specify the degree of hotness. Best regards, ...

Italian Language: Ways to say 'Please', gradations, cordiality
gradations, cordiality, formality: Hi Carl, Italian differs to English in the way that although there are different gradations of formality between certain words, the major way to show cordiality is to simply use the polite form like you have done in your examples. To look at specific...

Italian Language: apocope, apocope, apostrophe
apocope, apostrophe: Dear Rich, generally speaking, you should write: “un po’di” without a space after the apocope, though it is common to read “un po’ di” as in “Si è parlato un po di questo e un po di quello” ( we spoke about this and that) which however should be written...

Italian Language: avere vs prendere, contrary to popular belief, piazza san marco
contrary to popular belief, piazza san marco, computer course: Hi Rich, The correct way to have a coffee in Italy is to say prendere un caffe. Contrary to popular belief, it is incredibly English to use avere. Avere would give the sentence the impression that you physically want to possess and own the coffee...

Italian Language: bello/bella?, translation from english to italian, beautiful mistake
translation from english to italian, beautiful mistake, correct translation: Dear Molly Bello Sbaglio is the correct translation. Bella Sbaglia means instead that a beautiful female is wrong. Also you could translate meraviglioso errore, which sounds better to me for a translation. bello sbaglio could be interpreted as sarcastic...

Italian Language: "bello" and "buono", ragazza carina, bella lucia
ragazza carina, bella lucia, e un uomo: Dear Rich, the literal meaning of the adjectives “bello” and “buono” is “beautiful” and “good” respectively. For example: “Lucia è proprio bella”(Lucia is really beautiful), “Andrea è un bell uomo”, “La tua casa è bella”, “E’ un uomo molto buono“( he...

Italian Language: bus words, piazza navona, corriera
piazza navona, corriera, stagecoach: Hi Rich, In Italian there are simply just several ways of saying the one word bus. Although there is no specific difference between the three terms, I would say for sure that autobus is the most commonly used. This would be used to describe any type of...

Italian Language: buses, servizio notturno, company bus
servizio notturno, company bus, italian word: Hi Rich, There is no need to state the word bus in this sentence as there would be a common understanding in Italian that servizio notturno refers to the night service of a bus company. Bus doesn t need to be justified here although if there was need...

Italian Language: campi flegrei, campi flegrei, volcanic area
campi flegrei, volcanic area, south of italy: Hi Rich, You may or may not know that many years ago before the Romans were even there, the South of Italy especially Sicily and Naples were colonised by the Greeks. Therefore the Greeks were the people who gave the volcanic area the name Flegrei. ...

Italian Language: centro città, centro storico di milano, masculine noun
centro storico di milano, masculine noun, feminine noun: Dear Rich, The expression “centro città” is in the masculine gender as it stands for “Il centro della città” where “centro” is a masculine noun. Therefore you must say: “Vado in centro città” or better “Vado in centro” in order to say: “I am going...

Italian Language: city centre, singer petula, petula clark
singer petula, petula clark, american audience: Hi Rich, Yes in England we use city centre for the American term downtown. Nobody in England will ever use downtown when referring to the centre of the city. The important thing about centro cittá is the concept that it evokes in your mind and not...

Italian Language: I.D., hotel receptionist, best of both worlds
hotel receptionist, best of both worlds, drivers license: Hi Rich, Carta d identitá should not be used when handing over a document such as driver s license etc. The reason I say this is because many European countries such as Spain and Italy have specific identity cards which are cards issued by the government...

Italian Language: dialect, italian phrase, dialect
italian phrase, dialect, false information: Dear Ronnie, it is not dialect but proper Italian.To tell the truth the sentence is NOT grammatically correct, in any case the possible meaning is that someone close to you is feeding false information.... Does this make any sense to you? Ciao Paol...

Italian Language: dialects and surnames, sicilian dialect, italian dialects
sicilian dialect, italian dialects, latin languages: Dan, I can t help much with the surnames, except to say that Piemonte has a heavy French influence which you will hear in the beautiful accent and dialect of that area. Also, another famous ending typical of Tuscany is -ini. As for the language, I have heard...

Italian Language: dimenticare, mi scusi, ombrello
mi scusi, ombrello, transitive verb: Dear Rich, it is so: both “Signorina, mi scusi, ha dimenticato il suo documento” and “Signorina, mi scusi, si è dimenticata il suo documento” are correct and mean the same, i.e. “Miss, excuse me, you forgot your document”. We can use in fact “dimenticarsi”...

Italian Language: dimenticare/dimenticarsi, reflexive verb, dimenticato
reflexive verb, dimenticato, transitive verb: Hi Rich, Yes the translations are all correct. When you are using dimenticarsi to talk about leaving an object behind or forgetting something, the article di always follows. To give another example: Mi sono dimenticato dei tuoi genitori Hope...

Italian Language: dimenticarsi, reflexive verbs, hard time
reflexive verbs, hard time, patience: Hi Rich, Although most reflexive verbs are classed as intransitive, dimenticarsi is a transitive pronominal verb. If you think of other verbs such as lavarsi we do not need a subject after the verb as it is apparent that the action of washing is happening...

Italian Language: dovere, alternate forms, best bet
alternate forms, best bet, conjugation: Hi Rich, Yes they are alternate forms that can be used when using dovere int he present tense. However they are very outdated and it is not often at all that you will hear an Italian say them. Your best bet is to stick to the common devo and devono....

Italian Language: ecco qui, ticket clerk, versatile word
ticket clerk, versatile word, centesimi: Hi Rich, The two phrases ecco and ecco qui mean more or less the same thing. However ecco is a very interesting and versatile word used a lot by Italians. Ecco is used when you are giving something to somebody or you see somebody. In your example,...

Italian Language: follow up, subject pronoun, personal pronoun
subject pronoun, personal pronoun, construction note: Dear Rich, in the sentence “Grazie, ecco qui quattro euro a lei e due biglietti” the word “lei” is nothing but the stressed form of the 3rd.person pronoun we use as a formal courtesy pronoun when talking to a person we are not familiar with. Instead...

Italian Language: Historical Text, mid 1500s, answer number
mid 1500s, answer number, writer states: Ciao Richcard, this is one of the most interesting questions I have been asked! Here my reply: Yes, number 1 is correct, the author means here old stuff. Answer number 2 is instead not correct, the author here means that the old remains of the town...

Italian Language: Italian buses, city buses, outlying districts
city buses, outlying districts, wrong bus: Hi Rich, I don t know if it stands the same for every city but from my knowledge of the cities that I have visited (major ones such as Rome, Florence, Pisa etc), the inner city buses were indeed orange. They will usually state on the side that they are...

Italian Language: imperfetto, ticket clerk, mancia
ticket clerk, mancia, mia moglie: Dear Rich, in the phrase: Dieci euro! Stupendo! Posso? Avevo bisogno di una bella mancia per far felice mia moglie! ( Ten euros! Great! May I? I needed a nice tip to make my wife happy!) there is “avevo”, which is the “imperfetto” of the verb “avere”,...

Italian Language: a lei, formal pronoun, grammatical theory
formal pronoun, grammatical theory, empirical rule: Dear Rich, first of all “per lei” would sound unusual in the sentence “Grazie, ecco qui quattro euro a lei e due biglietti” simply because in this context the preposition “per” instead of “a” would sound inappropriate and a bit pompous. In short, it...

Italian Language: orto vs giardino, orto, public gardens
orto, public gardens, giardino: Hi Rich, Whenever there are public gardens in Italy, although they can be seen as giardini pubblici, it is very common to find the word orto or orti botanici. Although once again there is no real difference, I feel that orto will provide you more...

Italian Language: past participles, english past participle, verb conjugator
english past participle, verb conjugator, adjective: Hi Rich, Sometimes you will find that a dictionary will not label both the adjective and the past participle as this would simply take too much room. You can be assured though that whenever you see an adjective with an ato or similar ending, it has come...

Italian Language: più with modal verbs, modal verbs, modal verb
modal verbs, modal verb, infinitive: Hi Rich, Despite the modal verb and infinitive being put together, the piu must still remain after the first word. Therefore in your example it is correct to say non puo piu usare le lire It doesn t sound grammatically correct to put it after the...

Italian Language: piazze, piazza navona, piazza san pietro
piazza navona, piazza san pietro, piazza san marco: Hi Rich, For a start, you have to try and think of street names as something totally seperate from the language s grammar in particular. For example, in English I am sure you could recall many strange street names that have no rhyme and reason for what...

Italian Language: popolo vs gente, plebeians, italian history
plebeians, italian history, popolo: Hi Rich, Popolo is a much older and political way of calling a group of people. It is likely to refer to the plebeians or proletarian people. I suppose that many street names are called this as a memory towards specific times in Italian history. In...

Italian Language: pronominal verb, reflexive pronoun, romance languages
reflexive pronoun, romance languages, verbs: Hi Rich, A pronominal verb is a verb that is accompanied by a reflexive pronoun. Pronominal verbs usually have three major classes based on their meaning: reflexive, idiomatic, and reciprocal. In English, it is less obvious although it does exist....

Italian Language: pronunciation, aiu, english word
aiu, english word, ew: Hi Rich, You are correct in what you say. The way you pronounce such sounds would be I-00. Therefore regardless of the word, any with aiu will be pronounced I-OO. The OO does sound like an English ew if this helps. Maiuri broken down would be MY-OO-REE...

Italian Language: qui and qua, adverbs, natives
adverbs, natives: Hi Rich, Although it wouldn t be strictly wrong, it does sound a lot more natural to place the qui at the end of a sentence. It is very rare that you hear an Italian begin a sentence with this word. There is no rule for this I am afraid - it is simply...

Italian Language: room, camera da letto, hi lauren
camera da letto, hi lauren, computer course: Hi Rich, That s not a problem. I meant that camera would be best when referring to a bedroom in a house but yes it would also be fine for a hotel as well. If you were talking generally about how many rooms a hotel had, then it would be suitable to use...

Italian Language: saying "fugitive" in Italian, equivilant, english speakers
equivilant, english speakers, fugitives: Hi Rich, To be honest there is no real difference between the two words. They are synonyms of each other.Although as English speakers we would tend to use fuggitivo which is more similar to our English equivilant, in Italian this seems to translate better...

Italian Language: "stupendo" e "stupente", verb tense, progressive verb
verb tense, progressive verb, subordinate clause: Dear Rich, As a rule, the Italian Gerund is a word that is used either with the verb “stare” to form a special verb tense that has no name but is equivalent to the English present progressive verb tense, or to express a subordinate clause as in ”Sbagliando...

Italian Language: subject pronouns, subject pronouns, subject pronoun
subject pronouns, subject pronoun, modal verb: Hi Rich, Still in this case it will follow the same rule and the lei will come before the verbs so Lei vuole venire is fine. Your other example with lei in the middle would not be typically used. However, if you were wanting to emphasise that this...

Italian Language: translation, direct object pronoun, reflexive pronoun
direct object pronoun, reflexive pronoun, reflexive verb: Dear Rich, Here’s the correct analysis of the phrase “Permetta che mi presenti” (Allow me to introduce myself / Let me introduce myself): -Permetta = third person imperative form of the verb “permettere” (to allow, to let) which requires the subordinate...

Italian Language: translation, omotola, bimba
omotola, bimba, bimbo: Dear Omotola, I love this sentence ;-) You could translate it: Io sono l ammiratore preferito del mio/mia bimbo/bimba where mio bimbo is masculine and mia bimba is feminine depending on gender of the baby. I hope this helps Ciao Paola ...

Italian Language: translation, tempo scaduto, correct translation
tempo scaduto, correct translation, tempo pieno: Hi Rich, It is simply translated as an integrated time ticket meaning that it is a common ticket and can usually be used for 75 minutes from first usage. A tempo is just a set expression to explain that the ticket is used at this set time. You...

Italian Language: use of andare with prepositions, grammatical rule, use of prepositions
grammatical rule, use of prepositions, native speakers: Patricia, there is absolutely no grammatical rule for the use of prepositions. How could one possibly explain why you ride ON your bike in English but IN bicicletta in Italian? For this reason, prepositions are usually the last thing you learn to use correctly...

Italian Language: use of the definite article, basilica di san giovanni, proper nouns
basilica di san giovanni, proper nouns, san giovanni in laterano: Dear Rich, The definite article is included before “Monte Pincio” in “Santissima Trinità al Monte Pincio” or “Santissima Trinità al Pincio” where Pincio is the proper noun of this Roman hill. The definite article is not included before the word “Rialto”...

Italian Language: use of "fare", apocope
apocope: Dear Rich, it is so: in the sentence “Avevo bisogno di una mancia per far felice mia moglie” (I needed a tip to make my wife happy) “far” is just an apocope of the infinitive form “fare”. Also, the infinitive forms of all verbs can be apocopated and...

Italian Language: use of, indee, mancia
indee, mancia, english speaker: Hi Rich, There is no specific way to remember this unfortunately. The best thing to do would be to think of far felice as one verb together. Although typically a verb and noun would go separately in English, try to imagine them as one piece: without the...

Italian Language: use of mancare, indirect object pronoun, computer course
indirect object pronoun, computer course, time hope: Dear Rich, in the phrase “…ah, scusi, mancano dieci centesimi” the indirect object pronoun “mi” is not included because the verb “mancano” ( present indicative, 3rd.person plural) related to the subject “dieci centesimi” means that the amount due is...

Italian Language: use of, subject pronoun, italian verbs
subject pronoun, italian verbs, correct translation: Dear Rich, Here are my answers to your questions. [1] Yes, “anche” is only used as a conjunction since in Italian grammar it is a conjunction, not an adverb. Only in archaic or literary texts “anche” was used as an adverb of time instead of “ancora”...

Italian Language: use of subjunctive, subjunctive, 9 times out of 10
subjunctive, 9 times out of 10, literal translation: Hi Rich, I m afraid that in this case, the computer s example is the only correct one: permetta che mi presenti. The reason for this is because there are certain clauses that will always trigger the subjunctive regardless of whether a hope is being...

Italian Language: verb, hortatory subjunctive, reflexive pronoun
hortatory subjunctive, reflexive pronoun, singular plural: Dear Rich, in the sentence “Signorina, mi scusi, si è dimenticata il suo documento” the verb “mi scusi” meaning “excuse me” is nothing but the 3rd.person singular of the imperative mood of the reflexive verb “scusarsi” whose imperative is in fact...

Italian Language: vr vip, reflexive verbs, dictionary states
reflexive verbs, dictionary states, sposarsi: Hi Rich, Yes it seems that VR stans for verbo reflessivo whereas VIP refers to intransitive reflexive verbs. This should also help you with your previous questions to me on reflexive verbs as you then should have a clear idea on what makes a reflexive verb...

Italian Language: WEDDING TOAST, wedding toast, dear philip
wedding toast, dear philip, memory of my father: Dear Philip, the usual saying here is Auguri e figli maschi . I must say it is a little bit old fashioned and discriminating female daughters. believe me I have two daughters and I would not appreciate a toast like this. But of course, it is kind of usual...

Italian Language: accented vowels, plural form, vowel
plural form, vowel, nouns: Hi Rich, Yes it is true that Italians nouns that end in an accented vowel are always invariable in number. Whenever you see this construction, there is no need to change the ending. Just by seeing the article in its plural form it is understood. Therefore...

Italian Language: addetto, dictionary entry, passato prossimo
dictionary entry, passato prossimo, latter time: Hi Rich, I m sorry - maybe I didn t word myself correctly.I wouldn t exactly call it a rule as sadly, it is something that just has to be learnt with time. There will always be particular words when used as adjectives that will need a certain preposition...

Italian Language: affare, literal sense, meaning of the word
literal sense, meaning of the word, doing business: Hi Rich, I know it is quite confusing but although affari does mean business in the enterprise sense it would still sound strange to an Italian to hear it used in this way. It would be far more common to say possiedo l azienda o l impresa. This sense...

Italian Language: affare, affare fatto, word business
affare fatto, word business, physical entity: Hi Rich, Affare is one of those words that can mean various things in Italian. First and foremost, it can mean a bargain or a deal i.e. fare un affare (to get a bargain) or affare fatto (it s a deal!) Also, such as your example it can mean business...

Italian Language: autobus, autobus, phrases
autobus, phrases, buses: Dear Rich, the only difference between stazione dell autobus and stazione degli autobus or fermata dell’autobus and fermata degli autobus is that: -we use stazione DELL autobus or fermata DELL autobus in the singular when we are referring...

Italian Language: "Che cosa fa?", carpenter, profession
carpenter, profession, contrary: Dear Rich, it is so: in the Italian sentence Che cosa fa? the present indicative can be translated as either the English ‘present emphatic’ [ do you do ] or the English ‘present progressive’[ am doing ]. Therefore, you are right in thinking...

Italian Language: capitalization, italian renaissance painter, lorenzo dei medici
italian renaissance painter, lorenzo dei medici, leonardo da vinci: Dear Rich, You must write correctly “Leonardo da Vinci” as the preposition “da” followed by the place name “Vinci” means exactly that this great Italian Renaissance painter, sculptor, draftsman, architect, engineer, and scientist was from the little town...

Italian Language: che, use of
use of : Dear Rich, Actually “che” (what) cannot function as an interrogative adverb. When we use “che” in a direct / indirect interrogative clause, we imply the noun “cosa” as in ”Che fai? “(direct interrogative clause); “Dimmi che fai” (indirect interrogative...

Italian Language: correct pronunciation, stress in Italian
stress in Italian: Dear Rich, As for the verb “concédere”, you have written the correct way of pronouncing its present indicative active, i.e. “conCEdo”, “conCEdi”, “conCEde”, “conceDIAmo”, “conceDEte”, “conCEdono”. On the contrary, with regard to the verb “telefonáre”,...

Italian Language: Da quanto tempo!, masculine noun, literal translation
masculine noun, literal translation, preposition: Dear Rich, You are right in thinking that in the exclamatory phrase “Da quanto tempo!”: - da is a preposition that means for - quanto is being used as an exclamatory adjective that means how much! - tempo is a masculine noun that means time...

Italian Language: d'accordo, masculine noun, elision
masculine noun, elision, adverbial expression: Dear Rich, d accordo is an elision of the preposition di (not “da”) with the masculine noun accordo . This expression is used to tell that: 1-we agree/ disagree with someone (Sono d’accordo con te/ Non sono d’accordo con te). 2-we get along...

Italian Language: di for specification, english bus, autobus
english bus, autobus, preposition: Dear Rich, Actually we can say “stazione degli autobus” - where the preposition “di“ used for specification is articulated- as well as sometimes stazione di autobus , where the preposition “di “ used for specification is not articulated, as the specification...

Italian Language: di for specification, type of transportation, definite article
type of transportation, definite article, preposition: Dear Rich, I think it is better to start from the examples so that you can better understand that it is the context of the entire sentence that determines whether or not the di for specification is articulated. So, we say: - Dov è LA fermata...

Italian Language: essere stare, indirect objects, indirect object
indirect objects, indirect object, sentences: Dear Rich, Actually the use of essere and stare in Lei è qui in vacanza? (Are you here on vacation?) and Lei sta qui per lavoro? (Are you here for work?) is correct, though in the second sentence we can say also Lei è qui per lavoro? as well...

Italian Language: "farcela", italian slang, slang term
italian slang, slang term, language usage: Hi Bariscan, Farcela is slightly more than just to do - rather it means to make it in the sense of to get by or survive I am afraid that once again it is simply just another idiomatic use of the ci It is quite similar to the other example you...

Italian Language: Italian use of Gerundio, st agatha, sant agata
st agatha, sant agata, accent grave: Hi Michael, Yes you are right. This would change the translation quite a bit. The sentence would actually mean: With regards to the festival, it is good to know St Agatha s story. In this case the gerund is acting in an idiomatic way to mean with...

Italian Language: the Italian word, dictionary states, collins dictionary
dictionary states, collins dictionary, ex libris: Hi Rich, Normally, ex doesn t need a hyphen after it in Italian. In all the examples I have seen it has not been included. I am interested to know where you saw the example of ex-compagno di classe because I have never seen this construction with a hyphen...

Italian Language: imperative or subjunctive, indirect question, imperative mood
indirect question, imperative mood, subjunctive mood: Dear Rich, actually in the direct question clause Cosa facciamo? the verb “facciamo” is a present indicative, 1st.person plural, not an imperative mood nor a subjunctive mood. “Cosa facciamo?” is in fact the phrase we use when we are wondering what...

Italian Language: invariable, nouns pronouns, singular and plural
nouns pronouns, singular and plural, italian words: Hi Rich, Yes invariable can refer to a variety of things. You are correct in assuming that it can refer to a word that is invariable in gender, in number or indeed in both. This is a broad term that is used in various ways throughout the language - basically...

Italian Language: islands, isola d elba, feminine nouns
isola d elba, feminine nouns, feminine noun: Hi Rich, As far as I know, yes, Italian islands will be classed as feminine and this will also be the case for other islands that belong to other countries. The reason behind this is the fact that rather than just being la and the place, it is understood...

Italian Language: lavoro or affari, formal structure, affari
formal structure, affari, lavoro: Hi Rich, To be honest this sentence can be translated either way. The sentence probably uses business as it is assumed that if somebody is away working then it will be on business. I suppose this sentence is translated this way just to make it clear to...

Italian Language: number, consonant, italian language
consonant, italian language, nouns: Hi Rich, Yes you are totally correct. This is usually because the words that end in a consonant are not originally from the Italian language and instead adopted from English for example. Therefore it is difficult to make an ending for them in Italian, thus...

Italian Language: Old Italian songs, italian christmas, italian songs
italian christmas, italian songs, christmas carols: Hello, Tu scendi dalle stelle (you descend from the stars) is one of the best known Italian Christmas carols; it was composed in 1744 by saint Alfonso Maria de Liguori, a Neapolitan priest. Text in Italian and translation in English can be found here:...

Italian Language: Piedmonte, english pronunciation, piedmonte
english pronunciation, piedmonte, italian region: Hi Rich, To put the syllables in a English way, you would pronounce it: PEA - ED - MONT - AY The stress will be on the ed bit so your voice will need to rise at this moint. Just think of ie as EE-AY in English pronunciation Hope this helps,...

Italian Language: placement of reflexive pronouns, reflexive pronouns, reflexive pronoun
reflexive pronouns, reflexive pronoun, reciprocal action: Hi Rich, Yes, with a reflexive pronoun in the negative form, you will always put the non at the beginning of the sentence followed by the pronoun itself. Therefore your example of non mi alzo is totally correct. You can also apply this role to...

Italian Language: possessive pronouns, possessive pronouns, possessive pronoun
possessive pronouns, possessive pronoun, definite article: Hi Rich, Yes you are correct. The definite article is not necessary before a possessive pronoun with the verb essere. Your examples are totally correct. Some sources choose to omit this rule but I think that it is important to know as it is quite a common...

Italian Language: what preposition goes with "fare una foto?", english preposition, italian equivalent
english preposition, italian equivalent, italian version: Ciao Bruce, your sentences are correct. Of is the equivalent of the italian di or dei or della (following your examples). in any case is, only, partially linked with the picture subject/action or the place. The italian version of He takes...

Italian Language: prepositions, italian verbs, preposition
italian verbs, preposition, crociera: Hi Rich, Although essere is the most common verb to be accompanied by the preposition in and then the other expressions, you can use other verbs as well. It would be perfectly viable to say: Odio studiare in vacanza for example or Mi piace mangiare...

Italian Language: pronomi oggetto diretto e indiretto, direct object pronoun, correct pronoun
direct object pronoun, correct pronoun, complemento oggetto: Hello! Actually the pronomi personali oggetto (called also complemento) are rather complicated: each pronoun has 2 forms, one tonic (or strong, meaning that they have their own stress) and one atonic (or weak, meaning that their vowels are never stressed,...

Italian Language: pronunciation, italian name, italian words
italian name, italian words, previous question: Hi Rich, Yes usually if the Italian name is spelled exactly like another word in the language, then they will both be pronounced the same way. Your example of Marino follows this rule - both the name and adjective are pronounced the same. In regards...

Italian Language: pronunciation, michele michael, italian names
michele michael, italian names, native speakers: Hi Rich, The two names are indeed pronounced with closed e s. I am sorry if you had thought otherwise before but they are definitely closed sounds. Also, in regards to your other question, I think that perhaps this is a question of dialect. Obviously...

Italian Language: pronunciation, singular version, italian words
singular version, italian words, italian word: Hi Rich, Yes the s in the plural form is pronounced exactly the same as in the singular gorm. This is a general rule that you can learn: apart from the ending, plural Italian words will be pronounced like their singular version. Hope this helps, ...

Italian Language: proper syllable stress/pronunciation/etymology of our family name, albanian origin, western sicily
albanian origin, western sicily, syllable stress: Salve! Actually the surname Musillami is quite rare as we find it only in 10 places all over Italy, especially however in the province of Trapani, like e.g. Castelvetrano, where your family emigrated from. It seems that such a surname can derive from...

Italian Language: Qua & Qui, italian sound, regions of italy
italian sound, regions of italy, regional issue: Hi Bariscan, Qui and Qua are 100% interchangeable nowadays and have the function of simply meaning here In the past (which is still the same now in the Spanish language) there were different forms of here depending on the proximity of the object....

Italian Language: "quanto" as as interrogative adverb, interrogative adverb, interrogative adjective
interrogative adverb, interrogative adjective, denaro: Dear Rich, You are correct: the word quanto is being used as an interrogative adverb in the sentence Quanto costano quelle mele? As for what you have read in an article on-line that states quanto is an interrogative adjective in this sentence...

Italian Language: reciprocal verbs, reflexive pronouns, reciprocal action
reflexive pronouns, reciprocal action, verbs: Hi Rich, The most common way is to classify the reciprocal pronouns and the reflexive ones under the same category. I have also seen them listed both ways and to be honest, it doesn t make much difference. The reciprocal pronouns are simply a form of...

Italian Language: reflexive pronouns, direct object pronouns, reflexive pronouns
direct object pronouns, reflexive pronouns, object pronoun: Hi Rich, Yes, usually reflexive pronouns will be classified as object pronouns because it is normally their function to act as an object pronoun. Therefore, your list of mi, ti, si, ci, vi, si are also object pronouns. As you ve probably noticed, they...

Italian Language: surname, veneto region, marchesini
veneto region, marchesini, northern italian: Hello, Marchesin is a surname from the northern-Italian Veneto region (the -in ending is very common in Veneto). It probably derives from a Marco whose sons were nicknamed little Marcos , or little ones of of Marco , and eventually the nickname became a...

Italian Language: Translation, italian song, italian words
italian song, italian words, correct choice: Hi Edmond, Is it possible to send me a clip of this song because I have spent a great deal of time looking for it on the internet but to no avail. In regards to your other question, the translation of the title would simply be That s enough now. ...

Italian Language: translation of AL DI LA, jerry vale, musicality
jerry vale, musicality, original song: Hello, my translation of Al di la was a literal one to give the actual meaning of the lyrics, so it didn t take into account rhyming, musicality etc. Jerry Vale s version, as it happens very often when songs are translated from one language to another,...

Italian Language: use of buonasera, rich dialogue, buonasera
rich dialogue, buonasera, brother john: Hi Rich, In the example you have given me, buonasera is simply acting as an icebreaker to say hello to the people. Although it does mean good evening, it can also just be used to say hi to somebody, as long as this took place during the evening of course....

Italian Language: use of "ecco", typical situations
typical situations: Hi Rich, Ecco Pietro is simply as you said Here s Peter. You will see this in typical situations such as when somebody enters a friend, perhaps to introduce them the other person will say, Ecco Peter. I suppose you could also translate this as there...

Italian Language: use of "ecco", matter of distance, inanimate object
matter of distance, inanimate object, subtle difference: Hi Rich, The answer will be basically the same as the previous question I have just responded to. The use of ecco will not change with inanimate objects and therefore the translation will remain here s my train. Once again like the other example, it...

Italian Language: use of, direct object pronouns, pronoun
direct object pronouns, pronoun, san marco: Dear Rich, you are right in thinking that in Italian a direct object pronoun is attached to ecco , and that this direct object pronoun is translated into English as a subject pronoun like in Here I am which corresponds to “Eccomi” where the direct...

Italian Language: Wedding Invitation in Italian, scopetta, wedding invitation
scopetta, wedding invitation, hi chris: Ashley, here are some ideas: E con gioia che vi invitiamo ad assistere al nostro matrimonio Il Signore Scopetta e Suo/a gradito/a ospite (this allows for the invitee to bring a guest of either gender) Si prega di rispondere prima del (enter...

Italian Language: Word meaning, renaissance italy, gonzaga family
renaissance italy, gonzaga family, italy region: Hello, the word “Gonzaga” means nothing in Italian. It is either a toponym, i.e. the place name of the little town of Gonzaga (in Northern Italy, Region Lombardy, Province Mantua), or the name of the Gonzaga family who ruled Mantua from 1328 to 1708...

Italian Language: The word : "ci" and its many uses??, direct object pronoun, grammar books
direct object pronoun, grammar books, spoken language: Hi Bariscan, Thank you for your interesting question. Yes, ci is one of the tricky constructions in Italian and takes a lot of practice to get the usage just right. In regards to each of your points: 1. Cosa ci fai qui? - Yes this can be simply asked...

Italian Language: on, italian prepositions, physical position
italian prepositions, physical position, abstract sense: Hi Rich, On is commonly expressed with in or su. Su is usually used when it is referring to physical position or where something literally is. For example il libro e sul tavolo, whereas in is used in a more abstract sense for on. Don t forget...

Italian Language: "ai" and/or "con", pizza ai frutti di mare, pizza pizza
pizza ai frutti di mare, pizza pizza, frutti di mare: Hi Rich, Yes, both these expressions could be used but be careful as their meanings are slightly different. Firstly, pizza ai frutti di mare is correct and it would refer to an actual pizza that has seafood as its topping. Whereas, to say pizza con i...

Italian Language: birthday wishes/toast, chinese origins, european ports
chinese origins, european ports, birthday wishes: Hello, Cin cin has Chinese origins: derives from ch ing ch ing, which means please, please. Used by the sailors of Canton as a form of greeting, friendly but humorous, was exported to European ports. If you have a follow-up, I m ready to help :...

Italian Language: in chiesa, al cinema. Per che e cosi?, chiesa di santa maria, ospedale gemelli
chiesa di santa maria, ospedale gemelli, spazio pubblico: Ciao, Le regole per usare a o in sono abbastanza complesse! Si usa a (o al, alla, ecc.) quando: - il luogo e una citta , o un isola piccola (tranne le isole grandi che sono anche regioni o stati); vado a Roma, a Capri, all Elba. - il luogo e un edificio...

Italian Language: birthday wishes/toast, town in salerno, italian phrase
Italian Language: birthday wishes/toast, town in salerno, italian phrase, dialect

Italian Language: giardiniera, pickled vegetables, italian pizza
pickled vegetables, italian pizza, frutti di mare: Dear Rich, It is so: “pizza giardiniera” means just “pizza topped with vegetables” and thus “pizza giardiniera con verdure” is redundant, unless the waitress wanted to clarify the term “giardiniera” we rarely use as it could give rise to confusion, since...

Italian Language: Italian pronunciation sites, hard drive failure, italian pronunciation
hard drive failure, italian pronunciation, computer bookmarks: Hi Rich, I am really sorry but I am afraid I don t remember the exact links that I gave you. The only thing I can recall is http://www.forvo.com/word/audio/ but this site is rather slow. If I think of anymore, I will certainly let you know :) Sorry...

Italian Language: Italian Word, syllibus, course quality
syllibus, course quality, italian word: Hello, a tesario or syllabus is an outline and summary of topics to be covered in an education or training course. It is descriptive (unlike the prescriptive or specific curriculum). A syllabus is often either set out by an exam board, or prepared by...

Italian Language: la frutti di mare, word pizza, frutti di mare
word pizza, frutti di mare, ordering in a restaurant: Rich, the article la in this case is referring to pizza , even though the word is left out. So if you have a type of pizza that is described by an adjective, then that adjective will have a feminine ending, just like pizza: example capricciosa . You can...

Italian Language: Medicis, bitter oranges, coats of arms
bitter oranges, coats of arms, urban myth: Hello, I would say the polyorchidism claim is just an urban myth: actually, the number of balls in the Medici coat of arms varies between 6 and 12, which would denote a really extreme case a polyorchism! The true origin of this symbol is unkwown, even though...

Italian Language: pasta, pasta alla carbonara, pasta al sugo
pasta alla carbonara, pasta al sugo, farfalle fusilli: Dear Rich, First of all we say “pasta”/“la pasta” in sentences like “Vuoi della pasta?”, “Ho preparato la pasta al sugo”, “Ho mangiato della pasta alla carbonara”, “Vuole della pasta al ragù?”, “Ho ordinato della pasta al burro”, “Mi piace la pasta al pesto”,...

Italian Language: Singular or plural?, plural form, cow
plural form, cow, singular: Hello Keira, you can say: Buongiorno, ha del latte di soia? or Buongiorno, avete del latte di soia? Translation: Hello, do you have soy milk? In the first sentence ha is the formal form of the verb to have . In the second sentence avete...

Italian Language: Toast, ann nee, veev
ann nee, veev, chin chin: Hi Jim, The way to say this toast is: Che voi viviate fino a centi anni! The pronunciation is: KAY-VOY-VEEV-EE-AT-TAY-FEEN-OH-A-CHEN-TEE-ANN-NEE Cin Cin is pronounced the same way as the English chin chin Hope this helps, Kind regards, ...

Italian Language: Translation, chanel 4, cose buone
chanel 4, cose buone, vivi la vita: Hi Emma! Here you are... 1. Le cose buone vanno in pezzi perché cose migliori possano accadere. (M. Monroe) 2. Ciò che si porta nel cuore, supera tutto il resto. (Unknown) 3. Per essere insostituibili bisogna essere diversi. (C. Chanel) 4. Divertiti....

Italian Language: use of "giardiniera", pizza ai frutti di mare, pickled vegetables
pizza ai frutti di mare, pickled vegetables, feminine noun: Dear Rich, It is so: the word “giardiniera” is a feminine noun that has two meanings: [1] Woman gardener [2] Pickled vegetables When used with pizza as in “pizza giardiniera -which however is not so correct in standard Italian- the resulting compound...

Italian Language: use of the Italian prefix "anti", slight difference, preposition
slight difference, preposition, different meaning: Dear Rich, With regard to the prefixes “anti-” and “ante- , the only one difference between English and Italian is that English uses “anti-” only to mean “against” and “ante-” only to mean “before”, whereas Italian can sometimes use “anti-“ and “ante-“...

Italian Language: use of "all'italiana", italian style pizza, marriage italian style
italian style pizza, marriage italian style, singular noun: Dear Rich, First of all the locution “all’italiana” is always in the feminine gender and singular number as shown in the examples you mention. The reason is because “all’italiana” stands for “alla maniera italiana” where the feminine singular noun “maniera”...

Italian Language: use of "all'italiana", italian style pizza, pizza alla napoletana
italian style pizza, pizza alla napoletana, french dishes: Hi Rich, Yes the correct translation would be Italian style . Al is used a lot in Italian after a noun to determine what style something is done in. If you have any culinary knowledge, you may notice that many French dishes have the term a la after them...

Italian Language: use of "la speciale", word pizza, masculine noun
word pizza, masculine noun, dictionary states: Rich, in this case, it appears that speciale is being used as an adjective that modifies pizza . Since it is one of those words ending in e it does not indicate at first glance what it s gender is. Here you can tell by the article preceeding it...and...

Italian Language: use of "non", better hope, adverb
better hope, adverb, adjective: Dear Rich, In this aspect, Italian is different to English. Whereas here we could simply say no more milk and it would be understood, in Italian it is necessary to include the verb as well because standing alone it does not make sense. Therefore, you...

Italian Language: verb pronunciation, first person plural, giamo
first person plural, giamo, jeah: Hi Rich, Sorry for taking longer than usual to reply. Yes in the majority of verbs, giamo will be pronounced JEAH-MO as in the examples of leggiamo and viaggiamo that you have given. The pronunciation of gia does differ when you are looking at nouns...

Italian Language: addressing women, personal judgement, signora
personal judgement, signora, italian version: Hi Jackie, Firstly, no, there is no specific way in Italian to say Ms. Instead, signora would simply be used. Secondly, there is no particular age when you would suddenly adderess somebody as signora. However, as you correctly stated, it does tend...

Italian Language: adverbs, nouns and pronouns, noun phrases
nouns and pronouns, noun phrases, adverbs: Dear Rich, Generally speaking, only certain types of Italian adverbs, such as “focus adverbs” in English, can be used to modify nouns and pronouns, when they indicate that what is being communicated is limited to the part that is focused and then they...

Italian Language: complementi, pizza by the slice, types of cheese
pizza by the slice, types of cheese, indirect objects: Dear Rich, First of all there is a difference between a “complemento di mezzo” and a “complemento di modo” that are two different types of “complementi indiretti”. The “complemento di mezzo” describes in fact the means by which something is done, while...

Italian Language: di for specification, computer course, autobus
computer course, autobus, asking this question: Dear Rich, First of all “Vuoi il mio numero di telefono? is correct, while “Vuoi il mio numero del telefono? is less correct, unless the noun “telefono” is preceded by a possessive as in “Vuoi il numero del mio telefono? Anyway we say correctly ”Vuoi...

Italian Language: expressions, double advantage, follow ups
double advantage, follow ups, piccioni: Hello Zahra, here you are the meanings: 1. Fare un viaggio e due servizi - To resolve two problems by one single action 2. Prendere due piccioni con una fava - To gain double advantage with little effort Fare un viaggio e due servizi is not very...

Italian Language: expressions, slang terms, brilliant person
slang terms, brilliant person, informal language: Hello, in the colloquial/informal language we can say “ aquila”, “drago”,“cima”,“asso”,“fenomeno”, “mago”,“campione” just to mean that somebody is a genius, a mastermind, a man of outstanding intelligence, a very clever / brilliant person. For example:...

Italian Language: expressions, italian thanks, business circle
italian thanks, business circle, louis xiii: Hello, -“Era forte come una vecchia quercia” means that somebody is very strong and then is as solid as an old oak. -“Era snella come un giunco” means that a woman/girl is very slim and then is as slim as a reed. -“Promessa da marinaio” means...

Italian Language: Italian grammar in movie question, italian grammar, masculine article
italian grammar, masculine article, george clooney: Hello, The reason why, when George Clooney s character meets an Italian local and says - IL Americano the Italian man corrects him by saying - L Americano!, L Americano! , is that in Italian we use the masculine article IL only before a word starting...

Italian Language: Learning Italian, corriere della sera, italian newspapers
corriere della sera, italian newspapers, italian literature: Mehrdad, you can easily find the Corriere della Sera , which is a very large daily newspaper in Italy, in both original and translated versions on line. Also, if you shop academic bookstores, also either in person or online, many of the classics of Italian...

Italian Language: Learning Italian, stone application, italian newspapers
stone application, italian newspapers, learning italian: Ciao Mehrdad, I m not aware about something similar to your requirements. I can suggest you the Rosetta Stone application to have a good method with the italian language and/or test your abilities. check the link: http://www.rosettastone.com/ ...

Italian Language: Maria, tu sei per me la vita, http www youtube, beniamino gigli
http www youtube, beniamino gigli, brilli: Hello, Here’s the Italian lyrics for Maria, tu sei per me la vita , as sung by Beniamino Gigli at the link below. As for my English version, I’ve put it in brackets: Io non so quasi dire (I almost cannot say) tutto ciò che ho nel cuor....

Italian Language: meaning of "chiava", vulgar slang, singular noun
vulgar slang, singular noun, italian dictionaries: Dear Rich, Could you please tell me the title of such a movie about Italy where the word you mention is written on the screen as part of the name of a church? I have to point out in fact that in Italian we have the feminine singular noun “chiave”(key)...

Italian Language: neanche, locution, gialla
locution, gialla, adverb: Dear Rich, The adverb “neanche” is used without including the adverb non in the same sentence when it modifies a noun, a pronoun, an adverb or adverbial locution. For examples: -“Neanche un bambino si comporta come te”(Not even a child behaves...

Italian Language: Pronouns, italian grammar, ciao joe
italian grammar, ciao joe, grammar book: Ciao Joe, because in the sentence me le ha date there is the implied noun botte (hit me) and le is referred to this noun. In the sentence mi ha picchiata you only describe the action of the implied subject he (LUI mi ha picchiata) and ha picchiata...

Italian Language: Prosciutto di Parma, parma prosciutto, prosciutto di parma
parma prosciutto, prosciutto di parma, prosciutto cotto: Dear Rich, actually the “prosciutto” is not a type of pork, but the upper part of a pork leg that has been salt-cured and air-dried. It is made in some different regions of Italy, especially in Emilia ( see “prosciutto di Parma”) and Friuli (see “prosciutto...

Italian Language: "pure", hortatory subjunctive, adverbs
hortatory subjunctive, adverbs, conjunctions: Dear Rich, the Italian adverb pure has a concessive meaning when it is used to modify a verb as in: Vada pure ( You may go ), Faccia pure (“You may do” / Please do ), “Parlami pure senza timore”, “Fate pure con comodo”, Parti pure per Roma, se...

Italian Language: Song dates and authors, vincenzo russo, gioacchino rossini
vincenzo russo, gioacchino rossini, carnevale di venezia: Hi Nat! Here you go: Violino Tzigano by Cesare Andrea Bixio - 1934 Terra Straniera by Claudio Villa - 1952 Tango Delle Capinere by Cesare Andrea Bixio - 1928 I Te Vurria Vasà by Vincenzo Russo - 1900 Luna Mezz o Mare by Unknown - Recorded by Pablo...

Italian Language: subjunctive, imperfect subjunctive, subjunctive moods
imperfect subjunctive, subjunctive moods, red apples: Dear Rich, The hortatory (not ‘horatory’) subjunctive like “Prego, mi dica” or e.g. “Dica pure!” is used in Italian to express an exhortation/invitation rather than a command, just I’ve told you in my answer on 12/16/2007. We use such a hortatory...

Italian Language: subjunctive, hortatory subjunctive, cup of coffee
hortatory subjunctive, cup of coffee, exhortation: Dear Rich, In Italian the subjunctive is used to express the possibility that something may happen like in “Penso che tu venga”, “Credo che tu sia buono”, “Avevo pensato che tu fossi esperto in quel campo”, “Mi auguro che tu abbia capito”, “Supponevo...

Italian Language: subjunctive, third person plural, third person singular
third person plural, third person singular, hortatory subjunctive: Dear Rich, Here are my answers: - Penso che tu venga (I think that you are coming) - second person singular of venire (to come) in the present simple subjunctive. CORRECT. - Credo che tu sia buono (I believe that you are a good person) - ...

Italian Language: translation, indefinite pronoun, direct object
indefinite pronoun, direct object, transitive verb: Dear Rich, you have correctly understood the Italian in the paragraph you mention. So, it is correct to say that “assaggia” (“taste”) is the 2nd person singular, imperative form of the transitive verb “assaggiare” that is being used with an implied...

Italian Language: Translation, sicily italy, sicilian woman
sicily italy, sicilian woman, rain barrels: Hi Nikki, sorry for the delay but I wasn t at home :) Spero che stiate bene. Rob mi ha detto che il viaggio in Sicilia e in Italia vi è servito per rilassarvi, ve lo meritate! Prima di tutto vorrei scusarmi per il ritardo nell inviare i pacchi! Speravo...

Italian Language: translation, word order, personal choice
word order, personal choice, vicky: Hi Vicky, The best way to say that sentence would be: Adatterò i designi alle tue esigenze. You could also use the verb adeguare like you have but I have chosen adattare as a matter of personal choice. You do not need the article ti before the verb...

Italian Language: translation from italian to english, vigile urbano, translation from italian to english
vigile urbano, translation from italian to english, translation from italian: Sorry for the delay. Hi, we ve received this afternoon your package perfectly sealed. We re happy and we thank you, you didn t have to bother. Noemi and Carola thank you and they re happy about the bookmark created by your nieces. Both the sweaters and...

Italian Language: trees, driving shaft, shaft drive
driving shaft, shaft drive, drive shaft: Hello, in Italian we use the noun “albero” just meaning “tree” in some expressions such as “albero genealogico” (family tree), “albero respiratorio” (respiratory system), “albero bronchiale” (bronchial system) , “albero vascolare” (vascular system), “albero...

Italian Language: use of the adjective "extravergine", extra virgin olive oil, virgin olive oil
extra virgin olive oil, virgin olive oil, previous question: Dear Rich, It is so: we can use the adjective “extravergine” as a colloquial way to refer to extra virgin olive oil instead of saying “olio extravergine di oliva” . Therefore “Voglio l’extravergine” (I want the extra virgin) means the same thing as...

Italian Language: use of "desiderare", initiator, waiter
initiator, waiter, expressions: Hi Rich, The example that you have just shown me is one of those set expressions in Italian that cannot be literally translated into English. Desidera rather than just meaning what would you like to the customer is more than that. It is an opener to a...

Italian Language: use of "ecco", signorina, direct object
signorina, direct object, indirect object: Dear Rich, You are right: one of the ways that the Italian adverb ecco can be used is as a mild exclamation to point out or present something and mean, depending upon the context “here”, there , that s it , “this is “, as in “Ecco, un cappuccino...

Italian Language: use of "ne", pencils, sandwich
pencils, sandwich: Hi Rich, Although usually ne is used to refer to something that has been aforementioned, in this case it would be fine to use it as this meaning is clear. Therefore, you could quite easily hold up any item of food and ask ne vuoi? as people would...

Italian Language: use of "niente", visions of italy, acorn media
visions of italy, acorn media, dirt floor: Dear Rich, The indefinite pronoun “niente” meaning “nothing” can be used either with the adverb “non” or without it, according to the context. For example, in the paragraph you quote Giorgio sighs “Niente” to mean “Non c’è niente” (There is nothing)....

Italian Language: use of "tutto", adverb, contento
adverb, contento, pronoun: Dear Rich, When a waiter states: “È tutto?” (Is that all?) to a customer, the word “tutto” is being used as a pronoun just meaning “all”/”everything”, not as an adverb. The question “E’ tutto?” stands in fact for “E’ tutto quanto vuole (Lei)/ volete...

Italian Language: verbs, grass cutter, calligrafia
grass cutter, calligrafia, verbs: Dear Zahra, the noun “tagliaerba” also called “tosaerba” (grass cutter or lawn mower just for cutting grass) can be used with the verbs “usare”, “adoperare”, “riporre”, “pulire”, avere , possedere , regalare , mostrare as in the following examples:...

Italian Language: vocabulary, masculine noun, italian radio
masculine noun, italian radio, equivalent word: Hello Zahra, The equivalent word for obituary is “necrologio”, a masculine noun, whose plural is ”necrologi”. Anyway we can also say “annuncio funebre”(plural, annunci funebri ) or “annuncio mortuario”(plural, annunci mortuari ). As for some...

Italian Language: words and verbs, vietato fumare, italian expression
vietato fumare, italian expression, journey to italy: Hello, here are my answers: 1.The idiomatic expression fare il punto means “to recapitulate/to sum up a speech/some facts/ a situation and to focus on a problem “. For example: “Abbiamo fatto il punto sulla situazione” (We have recapitulated the...

Italian Language: zucchina/o e calamari, frittata di zucchine, feminine noun
frittata di zucchine, feminine noun, masculine noun: Dear Rich, Actually there is no difference between zucchino (masculine noun) and zucchina (feminine noun) as they both are the diminutive of “zucca” (feminine noun), although the feminine “zucchina” is more common. In short, we can say “Ho comprato...

Italian Language: alla and la/il and al, italian grammar, grammar book
italian grammar, grammar book, bambina: Hamed, alla is simply the contraction of a + la, or in English, to the . In this example, Bambina is feminine, and so it takes the feminine article la . Because of this, if you have the word a before it, the two must contract to alla . If you are...

Italian Language: "aranciata", orange soda, san pellegrino
orange soda, san pellegrino, aranciata: Dear Rich, the noun aranciata can indicate either a beverage of orange juice, sugar, and water ( orange drink /”orangeade”) or a carbonated beverage that has an orange colour and taste, i.e. orange soda as for example “Aranciata San Pellegrino”...

Italian Language: case, object of preposition, possessive adjectives
object of preposition, possessive adjectives, objective case: Dear Rich, It is so: only the nominative case and the vocative case exist in Italian because a declension , considered as a series of cases, does not occur in Italian, differently from Latin, where nouns have the nominative, genitive, dative, accusative,...

Italian Language: Christmas Card, christmas greetings, italian christmas
christmas greetings, italian christmas, auguri di buon natale: Hello, Italian Christmas greetings are correct, apart from the first word which is “Torna”, not “Corna”, of course. So, here’s the translation you need: “Christmas is back and my thought flies to You who are so dear to me. My best and sincere...

Italian Language: "di dove", object of the preposition, interrogative adverb
object of the preposition, interrogative adverb, adverb of place: Dear Rich, the expression ”di dove” as in “Di dove sei?” (Where are you from?) or “Da dove” as in “Non so da dove cominciare”( I don t know where to begin), where the adverb “dove” indicating the place from which the action of the verb is taking place...

Italian Language: interjection "ah", interjections, computer course
interjections, computer course, different meaning: Dear Rich, the Italian interjection ah has a different meaning than do the Italian interjection o used in direct address, whereas it is fairly the same as “oh” when used to express various emotions, such as satisfaction, surprise, delight or pain...

Italian Language: interjections - "O" e "Oh", italian pronunciation, interjection
italian pronunciation, interjection, italian word: Dear Rich, First of all the Italian interjections “oh” and “o” are not pronounced the same since “oh” used to express strong emotion, such as surprise, fear, anger, doubt, compassion or pain is pronounced as an O quite long like roughly in the English...

Italian Language: Italian Christmas Song, canzoni natale, xmas songs
canzoni natale, xmas songs, italy milan: Ciao Joan! is very difficult find a song with this poor info you gave me. Consider I m form the north of Italy (Milan) and I ve not idea about the south Xmas songs... was the song in dialect? please check the youtube link I ve found: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkBA6bKh8tk&feature=related...

Italian Language: names of cities, reggio calabria, italian cities
reggio calabria, italian cities, english cities: Dear Rich, First of all I have to tell you that there is no international system for the names of cities, and therefore some cities have a different name in Italian than in English, but other cities have the same name in both Italian and English. For...

Italian Language: Personalities, female personalities, levi montalcini
female personalities, levi montalcini, masculine name: Hello, female personalities in Italy are referred to with la , e.g. “la Duse”, “la Loren”, “la Maraini”, “la Levi-Montalcini”, “la Thatcher”, etc. simply because we omit the noun “signora”(Mrs) as in “la signora Duse”, “la signora Loren”, etc. and therefore...

Italian Language: phrases, italian thanks, zahra
italian thanks, zahra, helping hand: Dear Zahra, “to shake hands with somebody” or “to shake someone’s hands” is “stringere la mano a qualcuno” in Italian. For example we say:”Gli strinsi la mano” (“I shook his hand”/ “I shook hands with him”). As for “to give somebody a hand”, it is...

Italian Language: prepositions, merry christmas and happy new year, negozi di abbigliamento
merry christmas and happy new year, negozi di abbigliamento, chief object: Dear Rich, first of all we usually say “Vado in centro”, not “Vado in centro città”, as the expression “centro città” is used only on the road signs to indicate the direction towards the centre of a town. So, we usually say:”Sto andando in centro” (I...

Italian Language: Song in Italian, merry christmas and happy new year, sapr
merry christmas and happy new year, sapr, happy new year: Hello, here’s the song “Profeta non sarò” performed in Italian by Demi Roussos, as you can hear at the links I’m writing below. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year, Maria. Profeta non sarò, ma il cuore mio sa già che io non vivrò un solo istante...

Italian Language: How to use 'mica' and examples, handy examples, hi lauren
handy examples, hi lauren, interjection: Hi Karen, Mica is best translated as at all such as I do not believe him at all which would translate into Italian as non gli credo mica! So whenever you see a construction of non...mica, the way to translate it would be at all Mica can also...

Italian Language: use of preposition "in", use of preposition, sardegna corsica
use of preposition, sardegna corsica, sicilia sardegna: Dear Rich, it is correct to state that the preposition in is used with names of islands to say in , at or to as in “in Sicilia”, “in Sardegna”, “in Corsica”, “in Groenlandia”. Anyway I have to point out that we use the preposition “in” with islands...

Italian Language: use of prepositions, val d aosta, valle d aosta
val d aosta, valle d aosta, venezia giulia: Dear Rich, You must use the preposition in , not “a” and therefore you must say: ”in Puglia”, “in Piemonte”, “in Val d’Aosta” or “in Valle d’Aosta”, “in Lombardia”, “in Liguria”, “in Veneto”, “in Friuli-Venezia Giulia”, “in Trentino-Alto Adige”, “in Emilia-Romagna”,...

Italian Language: use of "a" with "scuola", indefinite article, preposition
indefinite article, preposition, definite article: Dear Rich, I think that you have understood the correct use of the preposition a with the noun scuola , just as you have said in the paragraphs [1] , [2] and [3] . What I have to point out is that “a scuola” /”in una scuola” /”in quella scuola”...

Italian Language: vocative case, nouns and pronouns, grammatical case
nouns and pronouns, grammatical case, case question: Dear Rich, By my answer I wanted to mean that Latin has a vocative case that is identified by a special ending that is applied to a noun/adjective/pronoun. For example, in “Tu quoque, Brute, fili mi” (You too, Brutus, my son), the last words that are...

Italian Language: vocative csse, vocative case, italian sentences
vocative case, italian sentences, carmen carmen: Dear Rich, You are right: the Italian sentences you mention are examples of the vocative case as the name Carmen is being directly addressed and, therefore, it is a vocative,i.e.a “complemento vocativo” or simply “vocativo”. As you can see, it...

Italian Language: words and verbs, full of hot air, masculine noun
full of hot air, masculine noun, feminine noun: Dear Zahra, Here are my answers: -1st.QUESTION:”What do you call incense stick in Italian and what verbs do you use with incense stick ?” ANSWER: We say “bastoncino d’incenso” and we use the verb “bruciare” as in “Bruciarono bastoncini d’incenso...

Italian Language: addirsi, collins dizionario, dizionario inglese
collins dizionario, dizionario inglese, dictionary collins: Dear Rich, in the sentence Sono addetto alla sicurezza the word addetto is used as an adjective like in E addetto alla segreteria”; Giorgio è addetto alla manutenzione”;”E’ un autocarro addetto al trasporto del bestiame . In all the above phrases...

Italian Language: addirsi, rock star image, dictionary entry
rock star image, dictionary entry, conjugation: Hi Rich, Addirsi would translate as to suit or to be suitable for This verb is a defective verb - this means it is an impersonal verb that only has a third person singular and plural present and imperfect. It has an incomplete conjugation and cannot...

Italian Language: adjectives, preposition, use of prepositions
preposition, use of prepositions, contento: Hi Rich, Even though adjectives will be followed by particular preposition, it doesn t necessarily mean that you have to use them 100% of time. The preposition is usually there as it changes the sentence s meaning. In the example you have given, it is...

Italian Language: adverb, adverb
adverb: Hi Rich, Although it wouldn t be strictly incorrect to place the adverb at the end of sentence, it flows much better when placed before the adverb. Therefore I would advise that you use it before the adverb only. Your examples are both correct - especially...

Italian Language: adverbs, savannah georgia, adverbs
savannah georgia, adverbs, adverb: Dear Rich, It is so: all adverbs that modify another adverb are placed before this adverb as in “Si è espresso troppo crudamente”, “Mi ha parlato poco gentilmente”, “Non voglio comportarmi poco educatamente”, “Non fare troppo tardi !“, “Stava poco bene”,...

Italian Language: asking questions, plural subject, person plural
plural subject, person plural, asking this question: Dear Rich, In the sentence Quando siete aperti? (When are you open?) you are correct in thinking that the verb siete is in the 2nd person plural form of “essere” because the person who is asking this question is talking to more than one person. ...

Italian Language: asking questions with tu,Lei, voi, and Loro forms, singular form, plural form
singular form, plural form, adverb: Dear Rich, Here are my answers so that you can to test your understanding: [1] Quando sei aperto? (When are you open?) -quando = interrogative adverb when -sei = ‘tu’ form of ‘essere’. (familiar/singular form for you in the 2nd.person...

Italian Language: avere bisogno di, course states, indefinite article
course states, indefinite article, computer course: Dear Rich, If you say Ho bisogno della carta , this sentence means: I need the paper , since you are saying that you need the paper to write, e.g. But, if you say “Ho bisogno di carta”, this sentence means: I need some paper , since you are saying...

Italian Language: avere, fare, e essere, sento, patience
sento, patience, weather: Dear Rich, Here are my answers: 1-“Ha freddo” means “He /she/ is cold” or “He/she feels cold”, just to say that someone feels cold/ suffers from the cold. 2- Ha freddo cannot be ever used to say IT is cold , since “ IT is cold translates as...

Italian Language: "avere" o "fare", feminine noun, correct answer
feminine noun, correct answer, adjective: Dear Rich, If someone asks you Is the water hot? (“E’ calda l’acqua?”) referring to the water in a bathing pool) - the correct answer is to use the verb essere and say: Si, è calda (Yes, it is hot) where the adjective “calda” is in the feminine...

Italian Language: Compound words in italian language?, english vocabulary, compound words
english vocabulary, compound words, relevant question: Hi,Marina! These verbs are called verbi composti .They mostly derive from Latin.Usually,there is one main verb( like trarre ) and its derivatives.By adding different affixes,the meaning of the verb is completely or slightly changed. For example, TRARRE...

Italian Language: "che cosa" and "avere", first person plural, interrogative pronoun
first person plural, interrogative pronoun, course states: Dear Rich, Your computer course is right in stating that in order to ask what s the matter one must use the following idiomatic expressions: Che cos hai? ( What s the matter? ) Che cos ha Aldo? ( What s the matter with Aldo? ) Che cos...

Italian Language: complemento, interrogative adjective, definite indefinite
interrogative adjective, definite indefinite, la mela: Dear Rich, as I have already said, the Italian word complemento like in the “complemento di causa”, “complemento di mezzo”, “complemento di qualità”, “complemento oggetto”, “complemento di compagnia”, “complemento di modo”, etc. cannot be one word...

Italian Language: complemento, complemento oggetto, traduzioni
complemento oggetto, traduzioni, adjective: Dear Rich, Your understanding is correct. As you say, in fact, in the sentence: Faccio traduzioni (I do translations) the word traduzioni (one noun) is a complemento oggetto , and in the sentence: Faccio buone traduzioni (I do good translations)...

Italian Language: complemento, complemento oggetto, plural noun
complemento oggetto, plural noun, translation work: Dear Rich, in the sentence Faccio anche traduzioni the complemento oggetto is the one word traduzioni which is the direct object of the transitive verb Faccio (1st.person singular, present indicative of fare ) just expressing an action carried...

Italian Language: complemento, object of the preposition, prepositional phrase
object of the preposition, prepositional phrase, finite verb: Dear Rich, First of all I have to point out that the Italian noun “frase” is “a grammatical unit that is syntactically independent and has a subject (expressed or understood) and a predicate that contains at least one finite verb”. Therefore the Italian...

Italian Language: Da Vinci Quote Translation, leonardo da vinci, latin translations
leonardo da vinci, latin translations, correct translation: Hello, I have to apologize, I had absendmindedly mistranslated your quote! Punisce is of course the correct translation of Punish, and the Leonardo da Vinci s quote is exactly that, Chi non conosce il male comanda che si facci , as found in Codice H. ...

Italian Language: definite article, definite article, school subject
definite article, school subject, internet site: Dear Rich, Generally speaking, we can say that the definite article is not used before the name of a language when that language is a school subject, as in Insegna Italiano , “Insegna Francese”, “Ha insegnato Inglese per molti anni”, “Insegnava Latino...

Italian Language: di, complemento di specificazione, english genitive
complemento di specificazione, english genitive, possessive case: Dear Rich, In the sentence Sono addetto al marketing di una società locale the preposition “di” is used to indicate the genitive case, i.e. the “complemento di specificazione” in Italian. Such a “complemento di specificazione” which is regularly...

Italian Language: di solito, masculine noun, adverbial phrase
masculine noun, adverbial phrase, prepositional phrase: Dear Rich, Although in Italian both the complemento and the locuzione avverbiale can be composed of a preposition and a noun, the complemento and the locuzione avverbiale” are different, simply because the “locuzione avverbiale” is an adverb, while...

Italian Language: dovere, short answer, verbs
short answer, verbs: Hi Rich, The simple reason is the fact that not even in English would we use the imperative construction for this verb. If you think about it, nobody ever shouts out have to! at somebody as it is just doesn t make sense on its own. There are other verbs...

Italian Language: preposition "in" with geographic names, preposition, milano
Italian Language: preposition "in" with geographic names, preposition, milano, roma

Italian Language: Help with 3 words!, italian words, 3 words
italian words, 3 words, nouns: Emma, it would sound better to say Sognare, Amare, Ridere which means to dream, to love, to laugh and makes more sense in Italian. Otherwise in your example you were mixing verbs and nouns and it becomes difficult for the reader to decipher at a glance...

Italian Language: interrogative adjectives che and quale, interrogative pronouns, comedy romance
interrogative pronouns, comedy romance, interrogative adjectives: Hello, quale usually implies a choice between options, che instead is used to ask questions about the quality or type of something: - quale film hai visto? = I want to know the title of the movie you saw - che film hai visto? = what kind of movie (comedy,...

Italian Language: modal verb, modal verb, computer course
modal verb, computer course, first person: Dear Rich, As far as I know, the modal verb “shall” is chiefly used in first person invitations and questions that request an opinion or agreement, such as Shall we go for a stroll? (Facciamo una passeggiata?) or “Shall we go?” (Andiamo?). Therefore...

Italian Language: last name, nixons, definite article
nixons, definite article, preposition: Dear Rich, while in English you can write or say: I said goodbye to the Nixons where the last name (surname) Nixon becomes Nixons in the plural by adding an s , for you are saying goodbye to several members of this family, in Italian it is not...

Italian Language: Pronunciation of a proper name, cozio, english pronunciation
cozio, english pronunciation, andro: Hi Bill, I will try to break it down into English pronunciation as best as possible: Ignazio (IG-NAZI-0H) Just as it sounds really! Alessandro (ALICE-ANDRO) Once again, quite a literal pronunciation Cozio (COTS-EE-0H) Di (DEE) Salabue (SALA-BOO-AY)...

Italian Language: preposition "in" with geographic names, place position, geographic names
place position, geographic names, definite article: Hello, by rule, in should be always used with singular names of regions, countries, cities etc.: - vado in Piemonte - vivo in Friuli - vengo in Sicilia Lazio and Veneto, however, are special cases: - vengo in Veneto or vengo nel Veneto - abito...

Italian Language: pronunciation, simple past tense, person plural verb forms
simple past tense, person plural verb forms, present subjunctive: Hello, Here are the correct accents and pronunciation of the third person plural verb forms you mention: -Present tense: dicono = dEE-co-no (The accent stands on the antepenultimate syllable “dì-“ [dEE]) For the correct pronunciation of the syllable...

Italian Language: How do I Say, lavoro part time, work part time
lavoro part time, work part time, tempo parziale: Hello, here you are the translation for your phrase: Ho tre figlie e nove nipoti. Sono in pensione ma lavoro part time come fabbro per serrature. Il mio hobby e la fotografia. Notes: - some English words have been introduced into colloquial Italian...

Italian Language: use of "addetto", predicate adjective, addetto alla sicurezza
predicate adjective, addetto alla sicurezza, preposition: Hi Rich, Addetto in this case cannot actually be classed as a modifier because it is not specifically modifying any verbs. Rather it is referred to as an adjective which is attributing to defining the subject of the sentence - in this case, I. Addetto is...

Italian Language: use of adjectives, colore nero, clarification purposes
colore nero, clarification purposes, giacca: Hi Rich, Yes these sentences are both totally correct. However, as I said in the previous message, it would be strange for an Italian to use the word colore as this is generally understood when they state the colour itself. But yes, for clarification...

Italian Language: use of "anche", subject pronoun, translation work
subject pronoun, translation work, faccio: Dear Rich, Insegno italiano e faccio anche traduzioni is correct, while Insegno italiano e anche faccio traduzioni is wrong. In fact, in sentences [1] and [2] the conjunction anche cannot be placed in either of the positions indicated, since the...

Italian Language: use of avere, horrible weather, bad weather
horrible weather, bad weather, tempo fa: Dear Rich, the verb avere cannot be used instead of fare” in Fa brutto tempo! ( It s horrible weather!) and Fa bel tempo (It s lovely weather). Therefore it is not acceptable at all to say Ha brutto tempo for It s horrible weather , while for...

Italian Language: use of di, correct translation, literal translation
correct translation, literal translation, computer course: Hi Rich, Di is the correct translation here. This is because when the person is referring to being in charge of marketing, the actual scenario is being elided. If you think about it, by just saying marketing, the whole structure is being shortened from...

Italian Language: verb tense, nonstandard varieties, italian verb
nonstandard varieties, italian verb, varieties of american english: Dear Rich, in “Ha un tavolo fuori?” and “Ne ho solo dentro” the Italian present indicative is not equivalent to the English present perfect as in Have you got a table outside? and I have only got some inside . So, you are correct in thinking that...

Italian Language: verbs, impersonal verbs, noun noun
impersonal verbs, noun noun, italian verbs: Dear Rich, the difference between defective and impersonal Italian verbs is that the defective verbs lack one or more of the inflected forms, while the impersonal verbs lack the subject, i.e. the noun, noun phrase, or pronoun that denote the doer...

Italian Language: "vicino", correct translation, adverb
correct translation, adverb, lavoro: Dear Rich, when the word “vicino” is used as an adverb, it is always placed after the adverb it modifies as in “Io lavoro qui vicino” (I work near here) ; “E’ successo lì vicino” ( it happened near /close to there); “Noi abitiamo qua vicino” (We live near...

Italian Language: volere, polite requests, computer course
polite requests, computer course, distinction: Dear Rich, The statement you found in the computer course that you are using to study Italian is correct, since we use the verb volere in the present indicative in questions to make an offer such as: Vuole qualcosa? / Volete qualcosa? ( Do you...

Italian Language: Arrivederci!, talking to a stranger, formal expression
talking to a stranger, formal expression, saying goodbye: Hi Negar, Arrivederci is a very versatile expression. It is definitely the option that you would use in a formal situation when talking to a stranger or somebody in a shop/restaurant etc. However, it can also be used with friends and wouldn t seem too formal....

Italian Language: "alcol" and "alcool", al kuhl, drinking alcohol
al kuhl, drinking alcohol, distilled essence: Dear Rich, in Italian we use “alcol” and “alcool” both used interchangeably and equally to refer to drinking alcohol” and pronounced the same, i.e. as the English “alcohol” without the “h” and the double “o”. This is a word of Arabic descent as it...

Italian Language: beverage terms, correct combinations, alcolico
correct combinations, alcolico, alcoholic drink: Dear Rich, first of all in everyday language there is no difference between bevanda and bibita just to express the word drink in Italian, though “bevanda” indicates exactly anyone of various liquids for drinking, i.e. a “bevanda alcolica”, “bevanda...

Italian Language: Correction, darai, lamore
darai, lamore, ti auguro: Hi Edmond, The corrections go: Da me contratti un attimo e chiederti se dirmi come stai Poter guardare gli occhi, di vedere, che ora, sei felice Basterebbe un attimo, sentire la tua voce Per ritrovar così un po di pace, un po di luce nel mio...

Italian Language: c'è or avere, colloquial expressions, slight difference
colloquial expressions, slight difference, solicitude: Dear Rich, the colloquial expressions “Che c è? / Cosa c è? / Che cosa c è? / “Cosa c è che non va?” meaning “ What s the matter? / What s wrong? / “What is wrong with you?” are used to express interest in someone we are familiar with as well...

Italian Language: c'è and ne, singular verb, correct response
singular verb, correct response, plural form: Hi Rich, As the ce and the e are being seperated in this case, you will simply elide the ne instead so the sentence would read ce n e or non ce n e. If you are unsure about the position, consider the plural form which is ce ne sono or non ce ne sono -...

Italian Language: comparatives with piacere, two different things, la mela
two different things, la mela, comparatives: Hi Connie, Piu can be used with both di and che. Di is used when comparing two different things with respect to one another or in front of numbers whereas che is used when the comparison is between two qualities of the same thing, in front of a preposition...

Italian Language: di for specification, minestrone, preposition
minestrone, preposition, risotto: Dear Rich, The expression Il piatto del giorno means just “The dish of the day”, as it indicates the recipe a restaurant offers as a dish of the day, apart from the fact that there is a menu where you can choose among many dishes served or available...

Italian Language: domandi, vado in palestra, italian sentences
vado in palestra, italian sentences, donna misteriosa: Hello, some of these Italian sentences are correct, whereas others are wrong and must be modified as follows: - Io invece vivo a Roma con MIA moglie Claudia e I NOSTRI due figli (You must add the conjunction “e”.) - Ha progettato le prime macchine...

Italian Language: meaning of "SS" in church names, suffix
Italian Language: meaning of "SS" in church names, suffix

Italian Language: "giorno" vs giornata", lavoro a giornata, masculine noun
lavoro a giornata, masculine noun, feminine noun: Dear Rich, Generally speaking, the difference between the masculine noun giorno and the feminine noun giornata is that “giorno” indicates the day itself as a period of 24 hours, whereas “giornata” indicates the entire day with reference to the weather...

Italian Language: giorno vs giornata, masculine noun, feminine noun
masculine noun, feminine noun, lovely day: Hi Rich, This is quite difficult to explain as these two words are usually understood by their context but I will try my best. Essentially Giorno refers to the day itself in a general sense whereas giornata gives a more specific sense as it refers to the...

Italian Language: Intransitivo, intransitive verbs, reflexive verbs
intransitive verbs, reflexive verbs, direct object: Kashish, Intransitivo means that the verb does not usually take an object---for example, you can read a book (direct object) or bake a cake (direct object), so read and bake are transitive and require avere as the auxilliary. Most of the verbs of motion...

Italian Language: indefinite article, indefinite article, correct translation
indefinite article, correct translation, radioactivity: Dear Rich, We say Non c è problema without the indefinite article before the noun “problema” when we want to point out that there is no problem at all, so that the correct translation would be “No problem”. On the contrary we say “Non c’è un problema”...

Italian Language: Letter Translation, Translated letter
Translated letter: Nicole, I had some difficulty in translating your letter word for word, but I tried to keep it with the same feeling. I hope this works out for you. Let me know if you need anything else. Jeremy Cara Felicia, Mi dispiace che non te ho...

Italian Language: maiuscolo, masculine noun, feminine noun
masculine noun, feminine noun, dictionary states: Dear Rich, In Maiuscola in Italiano the word maiuscola is simply the feminine form of the adjective “maiuscolo” (capital) agreed with the noun “lettera” (letter) which is implied. In short, we use “maiuscola” instead of “lettera maiuscola” just...

Italian Language: meaning of "SS" in church names, church names, biblical texts
church names, biblical texts, annunciation: Hi Rich, Yes you are correct. This is a common abbreviation that is seen very often in Italy. SS means santissima - the example of the church Santissima Annunziata is probably the most common usage of this. This is usually translated as very holy as...

Italian Language: ne and adjectives, numerical answer, bear witness
numerical answer, bear witness, plural form: Hi Rich, Yes that is perfectly correct. Ne can be followed by various adectives - the examples that you have given with me with a quantifier such as molti and a numerical answer such as tre bear witness to the fact that this structure can be used. You...

Italian Language: ospedale centrale, central geographic location, lavoro a milano
central geographic location, lavoro a milano, southern italy: Dear Rich, Generally speaking, the central hospital (ospedale centrale) is in a more central geographic location, and then the name posted on the building could just say Ospedale Centrale . Anyway an “ospedale centrale” could also have a proper...

Italian Language: ospedale centrale, nearest hospital, different meaning
nearest hospital, different meaning, adjective: Dear Rich, Actually we say “ospedale” when talking in general, without referring to a specific hospital, either because there is only one hospital or because we do not know the name of this hospital. On the contrary we say “ospedale centrale” when...

Italian Language: prego, polite request, polite requests
polite request, polite requests, deare: Dear Rich, In the first line of the dialogue you mention, i.e. “Buongiorno. Prego?” (Good morning. What would you like?) said by a barman to a guest the interjection “Prego” is used as a polite request to ask him/her/ what he/she wants to drink. But...

Italian Language: prepositions, articles, and geographic names, feminine name, ditalia
feminine name, ditalia, cieli di toscana: Hello, first of all I have to tell you that in Italian we can say both Cieli di Toscana ( with the “preposizione semplice” “di” ) and “Cieli della Toscana” (with the “preposizione articolata” “della” in the feminine as related to the feminine name Toscana)....

Italian Language: pronouns, indirect object pronoun, direct object pronouns
indirect object pronoun, direct object pronouns, direct object pronoun: Dear Rich, yes, the Vi in Desideriamo ringraziarVi per quanto avete fatto per noi” is a Plural Direct Object pronoun as it stands for “Desideriamo ringraziare Voi…” where the “voi” is the direct object of the transitive verb “ringraziare”. Also,...

Italian Language: pronouns, indirect object pronoun, direct object pronoun
indirect object pronoun, direct object pronoun, subject pronoun: Hi Rich, Yes it is acceptable to place the subject pronoun at the end of the sentence even if it is in the passato prossimo. Like you say, it isn t the best thing to do however it wouldn t be totally unacceptable. Therefore, yes it is possible for you...

Italian Language: Quotation Clarification, translator tool, grammatical structures
translator tool, grammatical structures, quotation: Hi,Ron! I also googled this quote and what I found is punisce . Conosce in this specific context would mean recognize , which gives the quotation pretty much the same meaning,but I believe that originally it should be punisce .The other expert didn...

Italian Language: qualcosa, indefinite pronoun, indefinite adjective
indefinite pronoun, indefinite adjective, losco: Dear Rich, you are correct in thinking that qualcosa (contracted/short form of qualche cosa ) is an indefinite pronoun, not an indefinite adjective. Moreover it is true that qualcosa can mean both something and anything in English, since in...

Italian Language: si sente, singular form, woman 2
singular form, woman 2, computer course: Hi Rich, Yes, you are correct. The si impersonal is being used in this sentence to express an impersonal construction. In English, it can be confusing as the use of one can has disappeared to be replaced with you can and therefore, sometimes it is hard...

Italian Language: translation, roma roma, dipinta
roma roma, dipinta, dialect: Hi Rich, Yes of course. These are beautiful lyrics that mean Beautiful beautiful Rome I painted you, yellow like the sun, red like my heart. Yes this is a form of Roman Dialect. Although Italian is the standard language, every region has a different...

Italian Language: use of - Che c'è?, cche, colloquialisms
cche, colloquialisms, expressions: Dear Rich, We use the colloquialisms Che c è? Cosa c è? and Che cosa c è? only to express you as in What s wrong with you? (Che cosa c’è che non va?). If on the contrary we want to refer to him or her , as in What s wrong with him?...

Italian Language: use of "che", relative pronoun, noun clause
relative pronoun, noun clause, english phrase: Dear Rich, the word che” in the sentence “Si sente che c è un po d alcool, ma è molto buono” is not a relative pronoun, but a conjunction which introduces the subordinate objective clause “c’è un po’ di alcol” depending on the main clause “Si sente”...

Italian Language: use of ne, smooth rhythm, vowels
smooth rhythm, vowels, cerco: Hi Rich, This is a difficult case as in these two cases, you would usually tend to write ne as using n seems and looks rather strange in this case. However, when you pronounce the sentence, it would be very likely that the e would be emitted for the sake...

Italian Language: use of "prendi", italian sentences, present tense
italian sentences, present tense, computer course: Hi Rich, Yes you are correct. They are two very similar sentences yet the stress that is made on them will alter the meaning completely. In the first example, prendi is the tu form of the imperative and so the person is giving an order for them to have...

Italian Language: apostrophe, time expressions, correct translation
time expressions, correct translation, apostrophe: Dear Rich, We write “L appuntamento è per l 1.50 “ meaning exactly “The appointment is at 1:50 p.m.”. We place the apostrophe only before the number 1, as in “l’1.50” in time expressions, simply because when speaking we would say: “l’una e cinquanta”....

Italian Language: ci or ce, mr magoo, ciao joe
mr magoo, ciao joe, four letters: Ciao Joe, ce/ci are pronoun particles that means the existing of something (or someone) in a place i.e.: CI SONO LORO they are in that place in the case of ce l ho the function of CE is to indicate that I have it I really hope this brief explanation...

Italian Language: declination, nouns pronouns, inflection of verbs
nouns pronouns, inflection of verbs, inflection of nouns: Dear Rich, Please accept my apologies for using the term “declination” when I wrote “the “–ire” verbs belonging to the 3rd.conjugation that add, between the root and declination, the suffix –isc-…” . The point is that, when I used “declination”, I allowed...

Italian Language: English Translation, greek goddess of the moon, alenia aermacchi
greek goddess of the moon, alenia aermacchi, goddess of the moon: Hello, the name Alenia Aermacchi shows the complex history of the company, with different acquisitions and mergings over the years that led to the present situation: Alenia was created in 1990 as a merging of Aeritalia (the aeronautical branch of Fiat)...

Italian Language: surname, gens labo, surname
Italian Language: surname, gens labo, surname, italy

Italian Language: fare+noun+di, grammar rule, colloquial expression
grammar rule, colloquial expression, speedy answer: Ray, I think I was not as clear as I should have been in our previous exchange. My point was that the phrase Fare una malattia di.. does NOT work, at least not in any normal context that I am aware of. I am only leaving the door open slightly for poetic...

Italian Language: Italian, godmother, madrina
godmother, madrina, padrino: Hello, comare and compare are regional / dialectal words for godmother and godfather. If you know your godmother and godfather would understand them, it s ok to use them. Otherwise, you should stick to the standard Italian madrina (godmother) and padrino...

Italian Language: Italian work plzzz helpppp, future tense, italian work
future tense, italian work, ciare: Gianna, the i is there only to soften the sound of the g or c preceeding it--it s not really pronounced. When you use the future tense endings, the e makes the preceeding g or c soft (remember, i or e makes c or g soft, a,o,u makes c or g hard), so the i becomes...

Italian Language: indirect object pronouns, indirect object pronoun, indirect object pronouns
indirect object pronoun, indirect object pronouns, object of the preposition: Dear Rich, your understanding is correct: Italian indirect object pronouns can translate into English as either an English indirect object pronoun or as an object of a preposition. For example, the sentence “Lui le dà il libro” can be translated as...

Italian Language: interessare, italian sentences, dictionary states
italian sentences, dictionary states, book interests: Dear Rich, In Italian the verb “interessare“ can be: 1-transitive as in “Questo argomento interessa chi ama la lettura” where “chi” is the direct object (This subject interests those who travel by train). See also: “La perturbazione atmosferica interessa...

Italian Language: Pronouns "gli" and "le", ciao joe, good hope
ciao joe, good hope, italian language: Ciao Joe, yes you re 100% right as we are used to make this BIG mistake... We try to be correct but only the very skilled in italian language are able to avoid this... is quite common (and not so good). Hope this will help. if yes try to rate me....

Italian Language: preposition "in", english preposition, black shoes
english preposition, black shoes, italian words: Dear Rich, It is true that the Italian preposition in is used with words for colors the same way that the English preposition in is used with words for colors. Therefore Sì, ne abbiamo in nero (Yes, we have some in black) to indicate that in...

Italian Language: preposizioni, profumeria, vado
profumeria, vado, magu: Ciao Flavia! allora... se mi permetti (non ti arrabbiare =P): Ciao. Mi chiamo Flavia e insegno un corso elementare di italiano all universita di Iowa. Ho una domanda: quale (E ) corretto: vado in profumeria OK perfetto vado alla profumeria OK...

Italian Language: pronunciation, third person plural, imperative tense
third person plural, imperative tense, correct pronunciation: Dear Rich, all your endings and accent locations are correct and apply to all the verbs you call isc verbs” , i.e to those “–ire” verbs belonging to the 3rd.conjugation that add, between the root and declination, the suffix –isc- to the first, second,...

Italian Language: sentire, inanimate object, freddo
inanimate object, freddo, senta: Dear Rich, in Italian we can use indifferently the verb “sentire” and the verb “avere” in regards to weather expressions and feeling temperature as in “Ho freddo” (I am cold ) or “Sento freddo” ( I feel cold) or “Ho caldo” or “Sento caldo” (both meaning...

Italian Language: song translation, song translation, nobody in the world
song translation, nobody in the world, first love: Hello, there are four characters in this song: - the singer, who wanders around playing his guitar - a man who s at the window and is suffering for a woman - this same woman, who for some reason cannot go and visit the man at the balcony - the singer...

Italian Language: surname, ellisisland org, rare surname
ellisisland org, rare surname, pellino: Hello, Pellini is a rare surname, typically found in the area of Tuscany where Borsigliana is located (mountain areas of the province of Lucca). The etymology of Pellini is not sure, but it might as been created in the middle ages as a diminituive form...

Italian Language: translation, interrogative sentence, colloquial language
interrogative sentence, colloquial language, literal translation: Dear Rich, in the interrogative sentence E ora, ragazze? ( “What now, girls?” ) the expression e ora whose literal translation should be “And now”, is just an example of colloquial language, where “ora” is being used as an adverb meaning “At this...

Italian Language: translation, book interests, correct translation
book interests, correct translation, person plural: Dear Rich, Se vi interessa questo concerto means exactly : If this concert interests you or “If this concert is of any interest to you”. Note that vi interessa comes from the intransitive form of the verb interessare meaning “to interest”,...

Italian Language: translation, direct object pronoun, verbs
direct object pronoun, verbs, amica: Hi Rich, Yes the sentence does mean my friend will let us in for free. Fare entrare is indeed an idiomatic sentence in which the two verbs together mean to let in and as you rightly stated, ci is being used as a direct object pronoun here. It could...

Italian Language: translation, indirect object pronoun, direct object pronoun
indirect object pronoun, direct object pronoun, person plural: Dear Rich, In Fatemi sapere se volete venire the verb fatemi is the 2nd person plural, imperative form of the verb fare with the indirect object pronoun mi (= ‘a me’) attached to fate as an atonic enclitic pronoun. “Fatemi sapere” stands...

Italian Language: volere, sentences, coffee
sentences, coffee: Dear Rich, You are right in saying that the verb volere is used in the present conditional to say what someone would like as in: I would like some coffee and that volere is used in the present indicative to ask someone else what he wants as in:...

Italian Language: alla marinara, spaghetti alla marinara, cotoletta alla milanese
spaghetti alla marinara, cotoletta alla milanese, riso al burro: Dear Rich, In the Italian expression alla marinara (abbreviation of alla maniera marinara ), as well as in “al sugo”, “al pesto”, “al ragù”, “al pomodoro”, “al burro”, all’olio” ( “spaghetti al sugo”, “pasta al pesto”, “pastasciutta al ragù”, “penne...

Italian Language: alla marinara, indirect objects, marinara
indirect objects, marinara, indirect object: Dear Rich, the expression “alla marinara” is grammatically classified as a “locuzione avverbiale”, though originally “alla maniera marinara” was considered as an indirect object, i.e. a “complemento di modo”, since it denotes the manner (modo/maniera) of...

Italian Language: alla marinara, spaghetti alla marinara, susanna agnelli
spaghetti alla marinara, susanna agnelli, dictionary states: Dear Rich, First of all I have to tell you that we can use the idiomatic expression alla marinara (abbreviation of “alla maniera marinara”, i.e. “according to custom of the sailors”) in the following cases: 1- with the verb “vestire” such as in the...

Italian Language: cello, cello, suffix
cello, suffix, singular and plural forms: Hi Rich, Yes, it is true that 4 different forms occur. This is due to the masculine and feminine singular and plural forms and any additional suffix will also follow the rule of having four forms as the ending must agree with whatever the article before...

Italian Language: cello, violoncello, cello
violoncello, cello, suffix: Hi Rich, Yes, this is correct. As you have already stated, in the word verme the stress will be placed at the beginning of the word. However, as soon as the suffix cello is added then the stress will alter and be placed on the first syllable of the...

Italian Language: cello, travicello, free dictionary
travicello, free dictionary, italian words: Hi Rich, In regards to your question, I cannot give you an 100% certain answer but I would take an educated guess at saying that the times when an i is placed before the cello is usually when the word has come directly from its noun form and is being...

Italian Language: cheque, american word, 3 words
american word, 3 words, english word: Hi Rich, Yes, in Italy cheque is used to mean what the American word check is. The actual correct way is assegno bancario or assegno although you tend to hear this less and less now as the English word has taken over. As for the spelling cheque...

Italian Language: Dialects that does not translate, italian dialect, southern italy
italian dialect, southern italy, dialects: Marianne, I am not familiar with the dialect of that area, but I know that some of the dialects can be quite different from standard Italian. There is a dictionary to help between Italian and Napoletano, but I don t know how much overlap there may be with...

Italian Language: da solo, predicate adjectives, predicate adjective
predicate adjectives, predicate adjective, adverbial phrases: Dear Rich, In Italian the preposition “da” placed before an adjective like “solo” in “da solo” or a noun like “amico” in “da amico” does not form a “locuzione avverbiale” as e.g. “da solo” or “da amico” are not similar to an adverb, but are “predicate adjective...

Italian Language: direct and indirect object pronouns, indirect object pronouns, direct object pronouns
indirect object pronouns, direct object pronouns, direct object pronoun: Liz, the examples you are working from are really terrible because they contain adverbs and object clauses that can cause a lot of confusion. I am going to give you some simple, straightforward examples to define direct and indirect objects and then we can...

Italian Language: Thanking Italian relatives, affetto, mio figlio
Italian Language: Thanking Italian relatives, affetto, mio figlio, detto

Italian Language: Italian tenses, verb conjugations, italian tenses
verb conjugations, italian tenses, imperfetto: Vargab, I would advise you to get any one of a number of books available that will give you all the verb conjugations you could ever want. Here is a start for you: Io parlo I speak Presente Io ho parlato I have spoken passato prossimo Io parlavo I was...

Italian Language: indefinite pronouns, indefinite pronoun, singular noun
indefinite pronoun, singular noun, indefinite pronouns: Hi Rich, I can understand how tutto can be confusing given that it is an indefinite pronoun, however when you break it down, it really isn t too complicated. As you have assumed in your question, by default you will always put tutto in the masculine...

Italian Language: italian grammar, possessive adjectives, possessive pronouns
possessive adjectives, possessive pronouns, italian grammar: Liz, I would be happy to help you. What you are talking about are possessive pronouns, but they function as adjectives in Italian. And you are right, they must agree in number and gender with the thing being possessed, not the subject which is doing the possessing....

Italian Language: italian idiom, italian idiom, hi lauren
italian idiom, hi lauren, unlucky person: Hi Jann, Yes I do :) This is an idiom used to describe a situation where a person is left to feel uncomfortable (literally, they are feeling on the shelf) It can also be used to describe an unlucky person. To put it into a context - let s say you go...

Italian Language: Learning Italian, italian radio stations, radio stations on the internet
italian radio stations, radio stations on the internet, grammar questions: Marianne, you need to give yourself every opportunity possible to learn in different ways, i.e. by reading, by listening and imitating, by studying and memorizing--they all have their place and time but but are dependent on each other. Rosetta stone is great...

Italian Language: Need help with some Italian translation, getting a tattoo, italian translation
getting a tattoo, italian translation, scusa: Paige, there is more than one way to say this in Italian, so I would advise you to get as many opinions as possible and go with the most common. Here is one suggestion: Forgive = Perdonare Apologize = Chiedere Scusa (or you can say Scusarsi) Be Free...

Italian Language: nouns, la feltrinelli, kate and prince william
la feltrinelli, kate and prince william, masculine nouns: Hi Rich, Thank you very much for your kind words. I had a lovely break thank you - now it s back to work again! As for your question, yes you are correct with what you are saying. Brand names will always have the article placed before them determined...

Italian Language: Song, Italian poem, a cappella
Italian poem, a cappella: I did a search on the Internet and came up with some good possible results. Unfortunately, I do not know the words myself or I d be able to help better Try this site: http://poesie.reportonline.it/poesie-di-maggio/alla-vergine.html. Here is what Google...

Italian Language: a sentence to translate, semi trucks, self confidence
semi trucks, self confidence, french words: Hi Jann, first of all the word “tir” or TIR is an acronym of “Transports Internationaux Routiers”, three French words literally meaning “Road international transports”, i.e. “articulated lorries”/ semi-trucks . As for the sentence “Ostentava sempre...

Italian Language: complementi indiretti, participle phrase, participle phrases
participle phrase, participle phrases, prepositional phrase: Dear Rich, It is so: complementi indiretti are not used as adjectives or adverbs, but are used to modify other words. For example in the phrase: fatti in casa the complemento indiretto in casa modifies the word fatti , but in casa is not...

Italian Language: suffix "one", suffix, pronunciation
suffix, pronunciation, bro: Hi Rich, Yes, regardless of whether it is masculine or feminine, singular or plural, the e will be pronounced in a closed fashion. So to give the example that you gave of librone, you would say LEE-BRO-NAY - i.e. a close e Hope this helps, Kind...

Italian Language: "sugo" or "succo", sugo, succo
sugo, succo, pith: Hi Rich, Yes, you are correct in thinking that you can also use the word sugo to mean juice in Italy. What I personally imagine is that the original word was sugo and through pronunciation over the years, the word changed and became the succo that...

Italian Language: "sugo" or "sugo di pomodoro", sugo di pomodoro, tomato sauce
sugo di pomodoro, tomato sauce, italians: Hi Rich, Yes you have got this correct. The right way to say tomato sauce is sugo di pomodoro. However in a context where it is clearly understood what sauce you are referring to, then you would shorten it to sugo. If you think about it, it is something...

Italian Language: Thanking Italian relatives, Thanking Italian relatives
Thanking Italian relatives: Cheryl, Cari Giovanni e Rita, Grazie per aver benaccettato mio figlio, Michael [or the italian translation, Michele]. Mi dice che tutto era splendido, specialmente durante suo compleanno. Mi ha raccontato la storia di Giovanni quando ha detto le...

Italian Language: tutto, adjective adverb, italian words
adjective adverb, italian words, position changes: Hi Rich, Unfortunately, there are no specific guidelines that I can give you in regards to tutto as its position changes constantly. I am sure as you have come to realise with languages that one rule cannot be applied 100% of the time and there will always...

Italian Language: when to use what, third person, hanna
third person, hanna, first person: Ciao! you use ha with a lady or a boy third person (lei/lui ha) she/he has you use ho with a first person (io ho) I have you use hanno with the the plural third person (essi/loro hanno) they have hanna doesn exist hope this will help and, if...

Italian Language: use of "da" before the infinitive "bere", signal word, computer course
signal word, computer course, infinitives: Hi Rich, Da bere is simply the shortened version of qualcosa da bere? Da is a preposition that is seen before many verbs, usually in situations such as with qualcosa , niente etc. It is something that is seen so often that we just accept it as a...

Italian Language: use of "dispiacere", learning italian, verbs
learning italian, verbs, translations: Hi Rich, Yes, both of your translations are correct. I understand how it can be confusing because as you have said, the structure is so different to English. It is hard to do but you must try and cut yourself off from the English way of thinking when learning...

Italian Language: use of "omaggio", free cups, cup of coffee
free cups, cup of coffee, free coffee: Hi Rich, Yes it is quite curious that omaggio can be both a noun and an adjective. It is true that it is invariable in its adjective form and means free . Therefore, you are correct in assuming that it is invariable in both gender and number. The examples...

Italian Language: use of "prendere", spaghetti alla bolognese, insalata di pollo
spaghetti alla bolognese, insalata di pollo, correct verb: Hi Rich, Prendere is the incorrect verb in this case - prendere is used when somebody is making a decision about what they want to order and they finally decide: prendero la zuppa di pomodoro (I ll have tomato soup) Whereas in English we would use the...

Italian Language: use of "tutto", last time, confidence
last time, confidence, va tutto: Hi Rich, You really should have more confidence in yourself :) Usually, what you are thinking is correct and this is just another case of that. It is perfectly correct to say tutto va bene as well when referring to a statement. Hope this helps,...

Italian Language: use of "Va bene?", interjection, english speaker
interjection, english speaker, different meaning: Hi Rich, Va bene has a slightly different meaning. It actually just means ok or alright - it is used in situations such as if somebody is explaining something to you and you are clarifying that you know by saying va bene, va bene You will find that...

Italian Language: use of "va bene", word order, correct word
word order, correct word, va tutto: Hi Rich, Yes, va bene does mean ok or all right but when it is used in an expression such as va tutto bene the meaning changes to is everything alright? It would also be possible to put tutto at the end of the sentence but it is much more common...

Italian Language: Va bene or Prego, common time, formality
common time, formality, rebecca: Hi Rebecca, In the situation of somebody bumping into you and saying scusi your reply would actually be non si preoccupi/non preoccuparti (depending on the formality) or simply nessun problema/non c e problema. The other 2 words that you suggested...

Italian Language: va tutto bene?, friend family, italians
friend family, italians, family member: Hi Rich, Yes in fact, in a normal everyday informal situation in Italy, tutto bene will be heard all the time. It is of course the shortened form of va tutto bene and when talking to a close friend, family member or indeed work mate, this is perfectly acceptable....

Italian Language: Wedding invitation, Wedding invitation, Italian wedding
Wedding invitation, Italian wedding: Melissa, First off, my sincere apologies for your family s loss. I will do my best to provide you the best translation. Do you have the rest of the invitation written in Italian, or do you need help with that as well? To translate your phrase, I believe...

Italian Language: adverb, adverb, adjective
adverb, adjective, patience: Hi Rich, I meant that the adverb solo can sometimes mean alone. This is when it is placed at the end of the sentence. Therefore I was just making sure that you knew to place it before as otherwise its meaning changes slightly. Hope this helps, ...

Italian Language: che as interrogative pronoun, interrogative pronoun, norm
interrogative pronoun, norm, languages: Hi Rich, Yes it would be perfectly acceptable. It was something that I first found strange in both Italian and Spanish as in English, it would be very rude to reply what if you didn t understand what somebody was saying. But in both these languages it...

Italian Language: complemento, preposition, abbondanza
preposition, abbondanza, colpa: Dear Rich, First of all I have to tell you that we use the word complemento to indicate either a direct object like e.g. “un libro” in “Ho comprato un libro” ( I have bought a book) or an indirect object like e.g. “mi” in “Mi ha dato un libro” (He...

Italian Language: complemento, grammatical category, preposition
grammatical category, preposition, autobus: Dear Rich, Yes, di used for specification is the same thing as complemento di specificazione . For example, you are correct in saying that “di autobus” in stazione di autobus can be called either complemento di specificazione or -in English-...

Italian Language: complemento di materia, stella d oro, bella ragazza
stella d oro, bella ragazza, lungo viaggio: Dear Rich, Actually an attributivo is not “a special construction that consists of the simple preposition di followed by a noun that acts as an adjective”, as you say. Moreover an attributivo is the same as an adjective. For example, in Italian...

Italian Language: complementi, giornata di sole, assolata
giornata di sole, assolata, english grammar: Dear Rich, The complemento di materia is not the unique grammatical construction that existed in contrast to the use of di for specification . In Italian there are in fact many constructions that use di between two nouns without being an example...

Italian Language: di for specification, stella d oro, marble statue
stella d oro, marble statue, specific restaurant: Dear Rich, Actually in La Stella d Oro used as the name of a ‘trattoria’ and correctly translated as The Golden Star the preposition “di” is used not for specification, but to indicate the material the star is made of, as in “una statua di marmo”(a...

Italian Language: With Faith Comes Hope, italian sentences, fede
italian sentences, fede, faith: Hello, “With Faith Comes Hope” can be translated as follows: -“ Con la fede arriva la speranza” (literal) Or: -“Dalla fede nasce la speranza” (free) Both the above Italian sentences are correct, but I would like to use the second, i.e. “Dalla...

Italian Language: father of the groom speech/toast, father of the groom speech, tourist phrases
father of the groom speech, tourist phrases, lunga vita: Hi Eamonn, The translation is as follows: Cari amici e famiglia, Con una gioia immensa, do il benvenuto a Kiera nella nostra famiglia Andrea e Maria dovrebbero essere molti orgogliosi della loro figlia Kiera e una donna fantastica e vivace - la persona...

Italian Language: formal sentences in italian, subject pronouns, word order
subject pronouns, word order, signora: Elisabeth, word order is not so important in Italian as long as you have the correct forms in there somewhere. You have a good dog ma m = Lei ha un buon cane, signora or any combination as long as the verb is in the formal form. Do you have friends here...

Italian Language: imperative, object pronoun, reflexive pronoun
object pronoun, reflexive pronoun, reflexive pronouns: Dear Rich, It is true that, when attaching an object pronoun to the end of a single syllable imperative verb, the first letter of the personal pronoun is doubled, but such a rule applies only on very rare occasions, simply because single syllable imperative...

Italian Language: lyrics for a song, italian phrases, baby eagle
italian phrases, baby eagle, melody: Hello, Here are the Italian phrases you asked me: -“Vieni da me!” ( Come to me! ) -“Vola!” ( Fly! ) -“Librati nell’aria!” ( Soar! ) -“Lanciati!” ( Leap! i.e. “jump down from somewhere) -“Spicca il volo!” ( Take flight ) -“Spiega...

Italian Language: Noun from verb, allsorts, hi john
allsorts, hi john, bevanda: Hi John, Unfortunately, there is no specific rule that exists when trying to derive the noun form of a word from a verb. It is frustrating because this would just have to be an exercise of learning as you go along. Every verb has different noun forms or...

Italian Language: parsing, adverb of affirmation, plural pronoun
adverb of affirmation, plural pronoun, adverb of place: Dear Rich, Here’s the correct parsing of “Sì, ce ne sono molti (Yes, there are many of them): -“Sì“ = adverb of affirmation meaning yes’. It does not modify the verb sono , as it is simply an affirmative response to the interrogative sentence...

Italian Language: partitive, bottiglia di vino, partitive
bottiglia di vino, partitive, del vino: Dear Rich, 1-Yes, the partitive article is not the same as partitive phrase simply because a “partitive phrase” does not exist in Italian, since tazza di caffè (cup of coffee) or bottiglia di vino (bottle of wine) are not “partitive phrases”, but...

Italian Language: solo da solo, predicate adjectives, interrogative pronoun
predicate adjectives, interrogative pronoun, complemento predicativo: Dear Rich, Generally speaking, “solo” and “da solo” as predicate adjectives to mean alone are interchangeable like in the following examples: -“Vivo solo” or “Vivo da solo”; -“Vorrei stare da solo” or “Vorrei stare solo”; - Se ne stava da solo...

Italian Language: solo, predicate adjective, adverbs
predicate adjective, adverbs, da solo: Dear Rich, Actually it is not always true that solo means only when placed before a noun. For example, we can say either “Manca solo un giorno a Natale” or “Manca un giorno solo a Natale” (it s only a day to Christmas); “C erano solo posti in...

Italian Language: translate to english, huggs and kisses, baci a tutti
huggs and kisses, baci a tutti, charlie hope: Hi Charles, The translation is: Hello my lovelies, I am looking for the soap but do you have by chance the exact name of the bar of the soap (for example, can you tell me the name of the brand) Could it possibly be Erbolario? Big hugs, Elisa Hope...

Italian Language: Translation, possessive adjective, possessive form
possessive adjective, possessive form, kind lady: Ciao Angus!! If you go to a kind lady and you want to tell her... hem... trust me... better tell her il mio cuore è tuo per sempre . il mio cuore è il tuo per sempre is something you do not use to say.. .but is correct . IS a way to say something...

Italian Language: translation, correct translation, possessive form
correct translation, possessive form, definite article: Hi,Angus! Sorry that it took me so long to answer you! Yes,il tuo is possessive form,but tuo is as well.in this case we don t need an article,because we have definite article in il mio cuore . I m still sticking to what I said before. :))) Best regards,...

Italian Language: translation of a sentence, eighteen cousins, italian phrase
eighteen cousins, italian phrase, mille grazie: Ciao Jann, ahahahaha the last part is: that the holy father can mantain you the sight because the appetite is already present is a common italian phrase to indicate someone that eat a lot =)) hope this will help and, if yes, please rate ...

Italian Language: tu form of the imperative, reflexive pronoun, object pronoun
reflexive pronoun, object pronoun, apocope: Dear Rich, The verbs dare , fare , stare , andare , when used in the affirmative imperative, 2nd.person singular (the tu form), have two forms, i.e. da’ and dai , fa and fai , sta and stai , va and vai . All these...

Italian Language: use of "adverbs of affirmation", adverb of affirmation, uncountable noun
adverb of affirmation, uncountable noun, italian dictionaries: Dear Rich, actually in Italian dictionaries the word sì is listed firstly as an adverb and secondly as an uncountable noun. It cannot be used however like an interjection, i.e. a word used by itself to express emphatic feeling. When used as an...

Italian Language: use of "che", interrogative pronoun, relative pronoun
interrogative pronoun, relative pronoun, elderly priest: Hi Rich, Che is actually being used as an interrogative pronoun here. It seems to me that the priest is startled as, as you have said, this isn´t a part of the Vatican that the public would typically go to. Che is a slightly rude response in this case...

Italian Language: use of "da", complemento di specificazione, wine bottle
complemento di specificazione, wine bottle, infinitive: Dear Rich, First, the use of the prepositions da (such as in ‘bottiglia da vino’ = wine bottle) and di (such as in ‘aperitivo della casa’ = house aperitif) are not methods used in Italian to express the English method of a noun used as an adjective....

Italian Language: use of "lo", direct object pronoun, computer course
direct object pronoun, computer course, waiter: Dear Rich, the translation “Mmm, I do not know….a Campari” for “Mmm, non lo so…..un Campari” is correct. As for the pronoun lo in the customer s response non lo so , it is exactly the direct object pronoun that means it . Such a pronoun is...

Italian Language: use of "Come, prego?", interrogative pronoun, english phrase
interrogative pronoun, english phrase, english speaker: Dear Rich, Come, prego? in the sentence “Come, prego? Vuoi restare da solo? Ho capito bene?” is equivalent to “Sorry?” like in the English phrase “Sorry, what did you say?” meaning “Come, prego? Che cosa hai detto?”. So, we use “Come, prego?”, if...

Italian Language: use of "si", adverb of affirmation, affirmative response
adverb of affirmation, affirmative response, previous question: Dear Rich, When an adverb of affirmation such as the word sì is used as an affirmative response in sentences such as: Posso entrare? Sì or C è un cinema in centro ? Sì, ce ne sono molti the adverb Sì does not modify any of the words in this...

Italian Language: Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, vino nobile di montepulciano, nobile di montepulciano
vino nobile di montepulciano, nobile di montepulciano, leonardo di caprio: Dear Rich, In “Vino Nobile di Montepulciano the preposition di is used for specification (indicating possession) as in Montepulciano s Vino Nobile , not as a part of a proper name as in the surname Leonardo Di Caprio . You have seen both ...

Italian Language: Welcome home?, female person, adjective
female person, adjective, singular: Hi Tina, “Bentornata a casa!” is the translation of “Welcome home!” just related to your sister on her return from Italy. Read more below. Best regards, Maria __________________________________________________________________________ Note that:...

Italian Language: "wine bottle" vs "bottle of wine", bottiglia di vino, rich wine
bottiglia di vino, rich wine, wine bottle: Dear Rich, wine bottle in the sense of an empty bottle that could be used to hold wine, but is now empty, translates as “bottiglia da vino” or “bottiglia per il vino”, though we usually say simply “bottiglia” without specifying, just because it is...

Italian Language: absolute superlative, forms of adjectives, strict rule
forms of adjectives, strict rule, personal point: Hi Rich, Nice to hear from you again! To be honest, there is no strict rule stating in what position to put absolute superlative forms of adjectives, however from a personal point of view, I would recommend placing them before the noun. The reason...

Italian Language: adverb or adjective?, feminine noun, adverb
feminine noun, adverb, adjective: Dear Rich, As you have remarked, the phrase Ho molto sete is wrong, since we say correctly “Ho molta sete” (I am very thirsty) where molta is just a feminine adjective that modifies the feminine noun “sete”. As for the way to know when to...

Italian Language: alla Genovese, pesto alla genovese, genoese
pesto alla genovese, genoese, correct translation: Dear Rich, You are correct in thinking that the literal translation of alla Genovese and pesto alla Genovese would be in the manner of the Genoese and sauce in the manner of the Genoese respectively. Anyway, it is not proper to translate...

Italian Language: E'vietato fumare and Vietato fumare, vietato fumare, auxiliary verb
vietato fumare, auxiliary verb, passive form: Dear Rich, Yes, you are correct in saying that “è vietato” is in the passive voice because the subject fumare is receiving the action of the verb è vietato . As for the translation of è vietato fumare into English, it is correct to say Smoking...

Italian Language: imperative, correct conjugation, person plural
correct conjugation, person plural, 3rd person: Dear Rich, the hortatory subjunctive is used when there is an exhortation as in “Amiamoci l’un l’altro!”(Let us love one another),”Andiamo!”(let s go!), “Possa Dio aiutarti!” (May God help you!”), “Prego, si accomodino!”,”Entrino, prego!”, “Vengano con...

Italian Language: Italian Birthday Card & Message, guida andrea, verb tenses
guida andrea, verb tenses, delicious tea: Hi Karen, The translation is as follows: Ero estremamente felice di vederti di nuovo dopo tanti anni. Sono grata che la nostra guida, Andrea, ci ha aiutato a ritrovarti. Mio padre mi manca molto e sono sicura che lui deve avere stato felice di vederci...

Italian Language: Magari, italian word, ti piacerebbe
italian word, ti piacerebbe, adverb: Hello, the Italian word “magari” can be an interjection/ exclamation as well as an adverb or a conjunction, according to the context. As an interjection/ exclamation expressing a wish, it means ”not half!” or “I wish I had!/ Would to heaven! For...

Italian Language: making a card for a lost family member, italian translation, arcobaleno
italian translation, arcobaleno, deep sorrow: Hello Alessandra, “Al temporale segue l’arcobaleno” is the best Italian translation for There are only rainbows after rain” just to say that even a deep sorrow is followed by a kind of serenity. I think however that you should add some words like e.g....

Italian Language: Ne ha combinate di tutti i colori, ciao joe, fild
ciao joe, fild, subject choice: Ciao Joe!! you are more than welcome! you are right for the plural form but this is referred to the action COMBINARE (where combinate is a big amount of actions) so, to be more precise, is NE and the verb HA (third person) that draw the subject...

Italian Language: nonsmoking, vietato fumare, plural noun
vietato fumare, plural noun, smoking compartment: Dear Rich, In the expressions sala fumatori , carrozza fumatori and reparto fumatori -that stand for sala per fumatori , carrozza per fumatori , and reparto per fumatori respectively- the preposition “per”-indicating the purpose of the smoking...

Italian Language: Oretta,mesetto, annetto,etc, diminutives, italians
diminutives, italians, adverb: Hello, we Italians use the diminutive for hour, month and year when we want to say that e.g. we will arrive in about an hour or we will leave after about a month /a year. For example we say: -“Possiamo vederci tra un’oretta?”( Can we meet in about...

Italian Language: past participles, sciu, uto
sciu, uto, participle: Dear Rich, It is so: the accent is always on the a of ato , the u of uto and the i of ito for the regular formed past participles. Therefore the examples where you have capitalized the syllables that you think should be accented are correct....

Italian Language: sugo di pomodoro, sugo di pomodoro, tomato sauce
sugo di pomodoro, tomato sauce, complemento: Dear Rich You are correct in thinking that di pomodoro in sugo di pomodoro is a complemento di materia because di pomodoro (tomato) indicates the material that the sugo (sauce) is made of. You are also correct in thinking that this complemento...

Italian Language: Translation, lost in translation, wonderful man
lost in translation, wonderful man, rubi: Hi Nikki, The translation is as follows: Signora Cestra, Volevo prendere il tempo per informarla che i miei intenzioni con suo figlio sono solamente i migliori. Amo Roberto molto, e molto incredibile e sono e saro grata per sempre per avere l opportunita...

Italian Language: translation/complemento, pesto alla calabrese, marble mortar
pesto alla calabrese, marble mortar, pesto alla siciliana: Dear Rich, Your computer course has translated spaghetti con il pesto piccante as spaghetti with spicy sauce just because what we call “pesto” is a kind of sauce made of oil, basil, garlic, pine seeds, salt and grated Parmigiano or Pecorino cheese,...

Italian Language: use of "ne", object pronoun, object pronouns
object pronoun, object pronouns, preposition: Hi Rich, In the examples you have given, I am afraid it wouldn t be acceptable to use ne Ne is a complicated little pronoun whose usage does take time to master. Basically, it can mean it but usually in a sense when a proposition goes before it and...

Italian Language: use of "vero", bella giornata, feminine noun
bella giornata, feminine noun, masculine pronoun: Dear Rich, In the sentence: È una bella giornata, vero? the adjective “vero” is used at the end of this phrase just in confirmation of a statement like in English “It s a lovely day, isn t it?”. Therefore this is a grammatically correct sentence where...

Italian Language: Venvenuti, amadeus, typo
amadeus, typo, pronunciation: Hi Daniel, Yes the translation is indeed a thousand million welcomes - literally a very large welcome to whoever it is. In old Italian, the letter b wasn t commonly used and instead it was a v that took its place, the same as in Spanish. If you...

Italian Language: Wanting to learn a phrase!, husband, translation
husband, translation, italian: Liz, What an amazing way to surprise him, if I must say. So, I will provide you with the translation to help you. Non sapevo mai che potrei amare qualcuno come (io) ti amo. The io can be omitted as the amo at the end refers to the first person...

Italian Language: "ah" or "oh", subtle shades, interjection
subtle shades, interjection, interjections: Rich, first of all, translators do take some liberties at times, so I would have to see both sides of this. Interjections can involve some very subtle shades of meaning. Italians generally say Ah! to mean I get it .. In English, I think we would often...

Italian Language: Antica Pizzeria Port'Alba, english wikipedia, antica pizzeria
english wikipedia, antica pizzeria, wikipedia: Dear Rich, the official name is Antica Pizzeria Port Alba, but it is so famous that most of the people simply call it Port Alba. I found a beautiful page on the english Wikipedia where you can see the board of this pizzeria. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antica_Pizzeria_Port%27Alba...

Italian Language: birrerie, bierkeller, plural form
bierkeller, plural form, italian restaurants: Hello again Rich, nice to hear from you! I am Italian and right now I m writing from Luxembourg :) Yes, birrerie is the plural form of birreria . A birreria could be a synonym for birrificio (the place where beer is produced). A birreria...

Italian Language: classification of "altrettanto", appetito, part of speech
appetito, part of speech, adverb: Dear Rich, the word altrettanto when used as a response to Buon appetito is classified as an adverb just meaning Same to you /”The same to you”. Such an adverb is not considered slang nor an idiomatic expression , but it is a formal part of...

Italian Language: DAI, driving offence, interjection
driving offence, interjection, policeman: Hello, first of all you absolutely must not say “Ma dai” to a policeman who has stopped you for a driving offence. You would be regarded as a rude arrogant person and the policeman would be ill-disposed towards you. “Ma dai” is in fact an informal ...

Italian Language: definite article, definite articles, definite article
definite articles, definite article, native speakers: Rich, I have to be honest with you--when I read #7 and repeat it back to myself quickly, I would naturally insert the article la before carne. It sounds better to me, it s the way I learned, and it follows exactly the same pattern as #4 with il pesce ....

Italian Language: "a" or "di", future tenses, john lurie
future tenses, john lurie, roberto benigni: John, the first thing you have to understand is that the proper use of prepositions is usually the last thing you learn in a foreign language. As a beginner, you don t yet have the sense of what sounds right, and there are few hard and fast rules to guide...

Italian Language: use of "e allora", computer course, adverb
computer course, adverb, cheese: Dear Rich, Generally speaking,it is acceptable for you to say either e allora or allora whenever you need to say so , since the conjunction e is sometimes included with allora” as a colloquial form like in “E allora prendi questa, la quattro...

Italian Language: elsion, viceroy antonio, spanish viceroy
viceroy antonio, spanish viceroy, antonio alvarez: Dear Rich, You are right in thinking that porta is not normally elided, and that Port Alba in the restaurant name Antica Pizzeria Port Alba is an exception. The name “Porta Alba” with the irregular elision of the noun “porta” is an old gate...

Italian Language: per favore and per piacere, native friends, italian books
native friends, italian books, job interview: Hi Rich, Per piacere and per favore are both expressions that mean exactly the same thing. They are used when asking somebody to do something and are totally interchangeable depending on which one you personally prefer to use. They can also be put at both...

Italian Language: per favore and per piacere, adverbial phrases, polite requests
adverbial phrases, polite requests, constructions: Dear Rich, The expressions per favore and per piacere used in polite requests are classified as “locuzioni avverbiali” ( adverbial phrases), not as complementi indiretti . As to where to place these constructions in a sentence, you must placed...

Italian Language: "forno a legna", hearth ovens, wood burning ovens
hearth ovens, wood burning ovens, electric ovens: Dear Rich, “forno a legna” translates as “a wood burning oven” or “a wood fired oven” where the pizza is traditionally cooked. The “forno a legna” is in fact an oven, i.e. a closed structure used for cooking, distinct from a hearth. Ovens are generally...

Italian Language: gnocchi al pomodoro, phrase one, tomato sauce
phrase one, tomato sauce, preposition: Dear Rich, in the sentence Oggi abbiamo gnocchi al pomodoro e lasagne al forno the expression gnocchi al pomodoro translates as gnocchi with tomato sauce , as you say. So, the reference book you mention states correctly that the preposition a...

Italian Language: Hats & hair, 3 hats, singular noun
3 hats, singular noun, cappelli: Hello, you are right: “She has 3 hats translates as “Lei ha tre cappelli . As for your doubt about “hair”, no confusion is possible because you cannot confuse “cappelli”(hats) with “capelli”(hair). As you can see, in fact, the singular noun “cappello”...

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Italian-Language-1584/2011/8/italian-question.htm


Italian Language: lasagna, pasta sfoglia, feminine noun
pasta sfoglia, feminine noun, lasagne al forno: Dear Rich, if you are using the word “strand” in the sense of a “layer” as in a cake layer, I have to tell you that the Italian term “lasagna” (feminine noun, singular)does not mean “one strand of pasta”, but “one wide flat rectangular strip of the “pasta...

Italian Language: lasagna e lasagne, singular noun, italian lasagna
singular noun, italian lasagna, baked lasagna: Dear Rich, lasagna is not classified as a non-count noun in Italian. It can be used, in fact, in both the singular (“lasagna , feminine singular noun) and plural form (“lasagne”, (feminine plural noun). Anyway, we prefer to use it in the plural...

Italian Language: To learn Italian, italian pronunciation guide, italian language lessons
italian pronunciation guide, italian language lessons, italian language schools: Hello, actually the best way to learn Italian is to attend an Italian course in Chile or to use some Internet Resources for learning Italian like the sites you can find below. See also below for Italian cities where you could attend Italian courses...

Italian Language: meaning of "questo", demonstrative pronoun, correct translation
demonstrative pronoun, correct translation, computer course: Hi Rich, I am afraid this is another usage of when Italian differs quite radically with English. Although typically questo means this and quello means that, quello would not be able to stand alone in the way that questo does. Quello nearly always must...

Italian Language: passive and reflexive, present tense, perfect sense
present tense, perfect sense, thanks in advance: Hi Victoria, I understand your concern - it can sometimes be difficult to distinguish between when the passive is being used and when the sentence is actually reflexive, however, usually this is simply understood by the context. In the sentence you have...

Italian Language: pizza al taglio, pizza al taglio, pizza al trancio
pizza al taglio, pizza al trancio, pizza by the slice: Dear Rich, here are my answers: [1]The expression “pizza al taglio ((literally, “pizza by the cut”), also known as “pizza al trancio”, means correctly pizza by the slice . [2] The preposition a in pizza al taglio /al trancio is an example of...

Italian Language: placement of adverb "solo", poche parole, sports goods
poche parole, sports goods, adverbs: Dear Rich, In the sentence “Abbiamo solo mozzarella” (We only have mozzarella) the word solo is being used as an adverb, as you say correctly. It has two synonyms, i.e. “solamente” and “soltanto” and thus we could also say “Abbiamo soltanto mozzarella”...

Italian Language: placement of subject, declarative and interrogative sentences, declarative sentences
declarative and interrogative sentences, declarative sentences, interrogative sentence: Dear Rich, the subject is placed after ci sono and c è in both declarative and interrogative sentences. Therefore in the declarative sentence “Ci sono libri in biblioteca” (There are books in the library) as well as in the interrogative phrase “Ci...

Italian Language: Renato C, poor translations, song poem
poor translations, song poem, original spirit: Salve! As you know, Renato Carosone songs are written in Neapolitan dialect, not in Italian, and thus I have to point out that it’s quite difficult to render them into English just because there are many dialectal idiomatic expressions which are not so...

Italian Language: how to say "four cheese pizza", cheese pizza, word pizza
cheese pizza, word pizza, italian cheeses: Dear Rich, the correct way to say: four cheese pizza is “pizza ai quattro formaggi” where “ai” is the articulated preposition of “a” in the masculine plural related to “formaggi”. In this case the preposition a with all its variations is used...

Italian Language: how to say "seafood", insalata di mare, frutti di mare
insalata di mare, frutti di mare, english phrase: Dear Rich, You are right: the singular form “frutto di mare” for “seafood” does not exist at all in Italian where there is only the plural “frutti di mare” just to indicate molluscs and crustaceans, i.e. edible shellfish, mussels, oysters, tellinas,...

Italian Language: song translation.. per favore, strano amore, bitter love song
strano amore, bitter love song, song translation: Hi al, here is the translation you requested. Title: Bitter Love Song: Hands, everything always begins with hands, and yet you didn t confess her your love even though she knows about it. And then, you know how to breathe only if she s there, you...

Italian Language: subjunctive after conjunctions, fiate, subjunctive
fiate, subjunctive, dispersi: Hi Beverly, sicché: it introduces a consecutive clause; in the literary world many split it in two words: Fieramente furo avversi A me e a miei primi e a mia parte, Sì che per due fiate li dispersi (Dante); sometimes with the subjunctive. Today we don...

Italian Language: trancia / trancio, pizza al trancio, trancio pizza
pizza al trancio, trancio pizza, masculine noun: Dear Rich, the masculine noun “trancio” has only one meaning, that is “slice” as in “a slice of bread”, whereas the feminine noun “trancia” has three meanings, i.e. “shearing machine”/ “shears”, “cutter” and “slice”, although this last meaning is not so...

Italian Language: translate to english, forte elisa, big hugs
forte elisa, big hugs, sapone: Hi Charles, The translation is as follows: Hi, We phoned the shop and they told us that they do have the soap but they cannot send it. We have to go there ourselves to buy it. At the moment, we are at the seaside so in September we will go and buy...

Italian Language: use of "buon appetito", buon appetito, follow ups
buon appetito, follow ups, italians: Hi Rich, this is a difficult question :) I ve just discovered that both your books are right! Personally I always say Buon Appetito to my friends and family before the meal. But the etiquette says: - don t say Buon Appetito before the meal; - don...

Italian Language: use of "c'è", interrogative pronouns, singular form
interrogative pronouns, singular form, plural form: Dear Rich, In the sentence “Cosa c è in questa? “((What s in this one?) related to the ingredients of a pizza it is correct to use the singular form “c’è” simply because the subject of this verb “c’è” (3rd.person singular) is “cosa” that is in the ...

Italian Language: use if "che", singular and plural verbs, interrogative pronouns
singular and plural verbs, interrogative pronouns, interrogative pronoun: Dear Rich, the Italian singular interrogative pronouns che , cosa and che cosa (that mean what ) can be used with a plural verb only when they are not the subject of the verb denoting action in the phrase. For example: -“Che /cosa/ che cosa...

Italian Language: use of "pesci", collective noun, one fish
collective noun, one fish, plural word: Actually Rich, I think it s much more complicated in English than it is in Italian--we use the collective noun fish to refer to a group of individuals, but we also can use fishes in poetic or antiquated language. In Italian, it s quite simple: one fish...

Italian Language: use of "ragazzi", feminine noun, plural noun
feminine noun, plural noun, pizze: Dear Rich, You have learned correctly that ragazzi” is a term used for teenagers and adults up to 30 years old. It is a masculine plural noun used to indicate boys and girls, when they are together, whereas you should use “ragazze” in the feminine plural,...

Italian Language: going to, milano verona, fiera di milano
milano verona, fiera di milano, dear fred: Fred, 1) Country, region, big island: In - Abito in Italia, in Liguria, in Sicilia (I live in Italy, in Liguria, in Sicilia) 2) City: A - Vado a Genova, a Milano, a Londra (I m going to Genova, to Milan, to London) 3) Own home: A - Vado a casa (I...

Italian Language: Ci mancherebbe altro, ciao joe, literal translation
ciao joe, literal translation, salve: Ciao Joe! no ci mancherebbe altro is a common way to say to someone don t worry about this and, in details: - for example I have to give you money because you buy something for me and I tell you: ok what I ve to pay you? in this case you can reply...

Italian Language: definite article, italian sentences, potr
italian sentences, potr, definite article: Dear Rich, Only the sentence “Non parlo bene l Italiano” (I don t speak Italian well) is correct, whereas “Non parlo Italiano bene” is wrong and denotes that who is speaking is not Italian, although we understand that this person wants to say that he does...

Italian Language: definite article, possessive adjective, definite article
possessive adjective, definite article, computer course: Hi Rich, Even though the person is clearly stating that Pietro is not her husband, husband is one of the words along with another host of singular family members that does not have the possessive article included before it. This doesn t matter whether...

Italian Language: to be, essere or stare, grammar book, concert film
grammar book, concert film, participle: Hello, You do not know when to use essere and when to use stare to mean to be simply because in Italian we use the past participle of the verb “stare” as a past participle of the verb “essere” in the conjugation of the “tempi composti” (compound...

Italian Language: Italian menu terminology, champagne toast, awkward constructions
champagne toast, awkward constructions, web translator: Stephanie, the Buffet Dinner would be Cena a Buffet . For Champagne Toast, there really is no direct translation. Toast is Brindisi and champagne used in the general sense as we do in English is simply spumante or vino spumante. I would just put Brindisi...

Italian Language: Italy, societa dante alighieri, dante alighieri
societa dante alighieri, dante alighieri, italian institution: Hello Tara! It s very nice to see somebody so committed to learning about Italy and its culture. Unfortunatel, there s not such thing as free travel, but there might be options you can explore, and see if you can find some sponsor or help from pulic organizations....

Italian Language: La zona dei cesaroni, cesaroni, living in italy
cesaroni, living in italy, fiction website: Hi Joe, la Zona dei Cesaroni is Garbatella. I Cesaroni is a TV fiction and the main location of this fiction is Garbatella. This is the fiction website: http://www.icesaroni.it/ I m sorry but at the moment I can t tell you why they re telling...

Italian Language: Does LEI have multiple meanings?, subject pronoun, travelling in italy
subject pronoun, travelling in italy, formal address: Michele, What you are used to seeing is the use of lei as the third person singular subject pronoun she in which case it is used just as in English...but you are also seeing it as the Forma di Cortesia , i.e. the formal address Lei which is indicated...

Italian Language: mica vs non...mica, personal preference, mica
personal preference, mica, spoken language: Rich, there is no real grammatical reason that I can give you for this--I suppose it s just part of the flexibility of the spoken language. I would generally use mica with the negative non , but you need to recognize that people will omit the non because...

Italian Language: nessuno, typing error, different meaning
typing error, different meaning, using the word: Hi Rich, Please excuse me - that was me making a typing error in my previous post. The correct way to say that sentence was indeed Non c è nessuno qui? like you said which would translate as Is there anyone here? The other way to also express this would...

Italian Language: nessuno as pronoun, masculine nouns, correct pronoun
masculine nouns, correct pronoun, indefinite article: Hi Rich, Yes you are correct with what you stated. Nessun can also be used and this is typically found with masculine nouns that start with vowels and indeed most consonants. An example would be nessun oggetto Similary, nessuno is used for other...

Italian Language: "non mai" and "mai", negative sentences, dictionary states
negative sentences, dictionary states, beve: Dear Rich, It is so: both non…...mai and mai (without the adverb non ) mean never , according to the context. See for example: -“Non beve mai birra” (He never drinks bier); -“Non viene mai” (He never comes ); -“Non avevo mai visto quel film”...

Italian Language: parsing, direct object, typical construction
direct object, typical construction, adverb: Hi Rich, Yes you are correct. The same reasoning would apply to non...mica as it follows the same construction. Therefore: non = adverb that modifies the verb capisco capisco = verb mica = adverb that modifies the verb capisco Hope...

Italian Language: passatutto, passata di pomodoro, small kitchen appliance
passata di pomodoro, small kitchen appliance, compound noun: Dear Rich, Actually the compound noun “passatutto”, that is composed of the verb passare (to grind/to mill/to press) and the pronoun tutto (“all things”/”everything”), does exist in Italian. It is just an appliance that processes tomatoes by separating...

Italian Language: passive voice, feminine noun, italian phrase
feminine noun, italian phrase, auxiliary verb: Dear Rich, First of all the Italian phrase “è seguita dal punto esclamativo“ you have copied from your Garzanti dictionary about the interjection “ah” means exactly “is followed by the exclamation point/mark . Secondly, the verb è seguita is being...

Italian Language: placement of "mica" in a sentence, passato prossimo, auxiliary verb
passato prossimo, auxiliary verb, word order: Yes you are correct in this but I would add that when you use the passato prossimo, mica generally is inserted between the auxiliary verb and the past participle. Example: Non ho mica capito This is not written in stone as word order is fairly flexible...

Italian Language: pronouns "niente" and "nessuno", inanimate objects, pronouns
inanimate objects, pronouns, pronoun: Rich, Nessuno is definitely used to refer to people, i.e. nobody or no-one. Niente is used for inanimate objects--nothing or none. Remember that in Italian the double negative is acceptable: Non vedo nessuno=I do not see nobody (or as we would say, I...

Italian Language: Small or little something, amorino, uzza
amorino, uzza, diminutivo: Salve! Actually we often use the adjective “piccolo” as in “Mi ha dato un piccolo aiuto” (He gave me a little help), “C’era un piccolo numero di persone” (There was a small number of people), “Ho trascorso l’estate in una piccola isola” (I’ve spent the...

Italian Language: my surname: ZRK, consonant clusters, italian surname
consonant clusters, italian surname, living in italy: Hello, Zrk is not an Italian surname; it might be slavic (Croatian/Serbian), since such so-called consonant clusters are common in that language. Do you know where this family lives in Italy? The Italian white pages (phone book) have no records about them....

Italian Language: translate letter from english to italian, baci e abbracci, huggs and kisses
baci e abbracci, huggs and kisses, 8 bars: Translation: Quando Songia ci ha chiamato, domenica, non riuscivo a sentirla o capirla a causa della pessima connessione telefonica. Mi ha fatto piacere che hai richiamato e che hai avuto una bella conversazione con Carmela e Daniel. Sembra davvero carino....

Italian Language: use of "mica", negative connotation, italian equivalent
negative connotation, italian equivalent, mica: Yes you are right that mica has a negative connotation whether or not it is used with the negative non . However I can think of one expression that is really kind of positive, mica male because it really means not bad ...so maybe as in algebra, in this...

Italian Language: use of "mica", communication business, everyday conversation
communication business, everyday conversation, casual conversation: No problem at all Rich, you can ask questions any time. I think I would agree that mica is very common in spoken Italian but perhaps not in the written language. Italian can get very flowery and formal in its various written forms, depending on the tone...

Italian Language: use of, negative connotation, course states
negative connotation, course states, equivalent word: Rich, sorry if I was not clear-- Mica capisco still has the same negative connotation as if it had the word non in there, so it cannot mean I really understand --it must be translated as I don t really understand or I hardly understand . I don t want...

Italian Language: use of "neanche", capisco, pronoun
capisco, pronoun, italians: Rich, let me clarify some of your examples-- Non capisco neanche.---this is fine as Italian does often allow the double negative unlike English. It will often be said Non capisco neanch io . Neanche capisco--You can do this, however it would come out...

Italian Language: use of "nessuno", indefinite pronoun, negative phrases
indefinite pronoun, negative phrases, interrogative sentence: Dear Rich, As you say, the indefinite pronoun nessuno must always be used with the negative adverb non in order to mean either nobody or not anyone in English as in “I have not seen anyone” / “I have seen nobody” (Io non ho visito nessuno),...

Italian Language: use of nessuno, nessuna direzione, italian star
nessuna direzione, italian star, adjective: Hi Rich, Your understanding of nessuno seems clear to me. All the sentences you have shown me are correct - you simply just need to put the negative non followed by the verb and then nessuno followed by the adjective and the sentence is created. This...

Italian Language: use of "niente", adverb, spoken language
adverb, spoken language, adjective: Dear Rich, Here are my answers to your questions: [1] “When niente is used as an adjective in familiar speech instead of nessuno , is niente ever used with the adverb non in statements such as:“Non ho niente paura“(I have no fear)?” ANSWER:...

Italian Language: use of "niente", indefinite pronoun, interrogative sentences
indefinite pronoun, interrogative sentences, indefinite adjective: Dear Rich, Your statements are correct. The only thing I can add refers to the third point, i.e. - Niente is not used as an indefinite adjective-. In familiar speech in fact we can use “niente” as an adjective instead of “nessuno”. For example: -“Niente...

Italian Language: use of non ...ancora, simple tenses, auxiliary verbs
simple tenses, auxiliary verbs, auxiliary verb: Dear Rich, Yes, È ancora malato translates as He is still sick as “ancora” (“still”) denotes that sickness continues and this person is not yet feeling better. But Non è ancora malato” means either that this person has not yet fallen ill or that...

Italian Language: use of "non…più", exact equivalents, translation from italian to english
exact equivalents, translation from italian to english, translation from italian: Rich, your sentences are correct in Italian, and I would say your analysis of the parts of speech is also correct. I would caution however about getting too set on a word-for-word translation from Italian to English because you will inevitably arrive at ideas...

Italian Language: use of pronoun "nessuno", hyphen, pronoun
hyphen, pronoun, pavarotti: Hi Rich, Yes indeed nessuno is also used to express no-one or anyone In your example, non ho visto nessuno clearly communicates that the person has not seen anybody. Another example would be C e nessuno qui? - Is there anyone here? To refer...

Italian Language: Aver, english phrase, infinitive
english phrase, infinitive, spoken language: Isi, dopo aver fatto is the equivalent of the English phrase after having done.. Note it uses the gerund form having in English but the infinitive form aver in Italian. Your second phrase, ..dopo ho fatto.. is using dopo in the sense of afterwards...

Italian Language: capitalization, sagra della lumaca, sagra della castagna
sagra della lumaca, sagra della castagna, sagra del cinghiale: Dear Rich, actually the noun “sagra” should not have been capitalized in the paragraph you mention where it is used by itself, just as you say. Similarly the noun “sagra” should not have been capitalized in “Traditions and customs are still greatly...

Italian Language: "castel", castel bolognese, castel san pietro
castel bolognese, castel san pietro, castel maggiore: Dear Rich, the word castel in Castel Gandolfo (Castle of the Gandolfi family) is just an apocopation (troncamento) of castello in Standard Italian, not a way to say castello in a different dialect. See also “Castel di Sangro”, “Castel San Pietro”,...

Italian Language: comune, torino bologna, population centre
torino bologna, population centre, governmental administration: Dear Rich, yes, there is a difference between a comune and a città , since the “comune” is just a level of governmental administration in Italy, whereas “città” is the noun we use to indicate either a city (as a town of significant size and importance)...

Italian Language: Di+articolo determinativo vs. Un po' di?, singular nouns, approximate quantities
singular nouns, approximate quantities, informal conversations: Hi Lindsey, The general rule is that the partitive is used to indicate imprecise or approximate quantities. Its translations into English could include a few or some depending on the context. To give some examples: Ho delle cravatte blu - I have...

Italian Language: "diritto" e "dritto", common phrase, cross the bridge
common phrase, cross the bridge, computer course: Dear Rich, First of all diritto and dritto are just different forms for the same word, since “dritto” is nothing but “diritto” with the syncope of the first “i” which has been omitted. Therefore it is correct to use either form, indifferently, just...

Italian Language: "exponent" number, mario russo, italian mailing
mario russo, italian mailing, apartment number: Hi Rich, As far as I know, the exponent number is the apartment number. As you may know, in Italy (as in Spain), the majority of people live in blocks of flats rather than houses, thus their address will contain the actual building s number as well as...

Italian Language: wedding invitation, indirizzo e mail, chiesa cattolica
Italian Language: wedding invitation, indirizzo e mail, chiesa cattolica, wedding invitation

Italian Language: Football teams, football club milan, masculine noun
football club milan, masculine noun, andrea doria: Hello, Actually there is no set rule about the gender of Italian clubs as this gender depends on what is implied in the name of each football club. For example, “il Milan” implies the term “calcio” for the professional Italian football club “Milan”...

Italian Language: forms of the italian passivant., passive form, learning italian
passive form, learning italian, hi john: Hi John, There are various usages of the passivant tense in Italian. In the first example that you have given me, it is used as an observation and could be roughly translated as one in English. However, in Italian, it is not seen as a pompous form...

Italian Language: Grammar, italian grammar, south italy
italian grammar, south italy, couple days: Hi,Cm! I m sorry that it took me so long to answer your question! Fu ucciso is Passato Remoto and it is used to express actions that happened far far away in the past and that have nothing to do with present or don t have any consequences in the present.But...

Italian Language: identification of Italian direct object pronouns, direct object pronouns, direct object pronoun
direct object pronouns, direct object pronoun, grammatical case: Dear Rich, It is exactly the same in Italian where direct objects can be identified by asking what or whom after the action of the verb, as in Può aiutarmi? (Can you help me?) where “mi” is a direct object pronoun. See also: Lo vidi parlare con...

Italian Language: imperative/subjunctive, hortatory subjunctive, person plural
hortatory subjunctive, person plural, 3rd person: Dear Rich, Strictly speaking, the verb forms listed as the 3rd person singular, the 1st person plural, and the 3rd person plural of the imperative are “hortatory subjunctive forms” that however are used as “imperative forms” simply because the imperative...

Italian Language: Italian addresses, mario russo, italian mailing
mario russo, italian mailing, apartment number: Ciao Rich! there are some streets in the italia towns that have some private branches or similar... inside this branches is possible the houses numbers became as indicated by you (123/4) or, in this cases, if there are a house complex this can have the...

Italian Language: Italian word "lo", italian word, fom
italian word, fom, thanks in advance: Hi Marius, The point of lo in this sentence is translated as the word it in English. It is used as a clarification method. So for example, if an Italian told you, Vado al museo adesso and you already knew this you would say, Si lo so rather than...

Italian Language: object of the infinitive, infinitive verb, italian grammar
infinitive verb, italian grammar, verb phrases: Dear Rich, It is so: in the sentence Voglio viaggiare per il mondo (I want to travel through the world) per il mondo is a complemento indiretto and particularly a complemento di moto per luogo and then the preposition per must be included in...

Italian Language: phrase, dark images, dark future
dark images, dark future, frame of mind: Hi Zahra, I thought at first that he was referring to some kind of child s toy, but I did not grow up in Italy so I checked with a friend of mine who did and she is not aware of any specific reference to quadri scuri . Here is what she said--I hope this...

Italian Language: use of "Ne", english phrases, nuovo lavoro
english phrases, nuovo lavoro, many different ways: Hello, Ne means of him/her/it/them , from him/her/it/them, about him/her/it/them : it is a pronoun that is used to substitute for a term previously used in the speech; the purpose of it is thus to link two phrases or statements without having to repeat...

Italian Language: Question, common expressions, uses of verbs
common expressions, uses of verbs, idiomatic expressions: Hi Isi, These are both very common expressions in Italian that don t translate very well literally, but they are used in the following senses: ci mancherebbe altro is like saying don t mention it! or it s the least I can do or even God forbid! ...

Italian Language: scusare, imperative mood, person plural
imperative mood, person plural, hortatory subjunctive: Dear Rich, the imperative of scusare is just used to excuse oneself. Therefore the verb forms of the imperative mood, i.e. “Scusa (2nd.person sing.), “Scusi” (3rd.person sing.),”Scusiamo” (1st.person plural), “Scusate”(2nd.person plural), “Scusino”...

Italian Language: Sorta di resa, resa dei conti, sense class
resa dei conti, sense class, mother language: In this case it can be talking about bourgeois as we use it in the English sense (class, group) or even about a particular neighborhood or quarter of the city, and it is saying that it marks a sort of surrender, of defeat . It is rather poetic language as...

Italian Language: spaghetto del carbonaio, destructive distillation of wood, parmigiano reggiano
destructive distillation of wood, parmigiano reggiano, distillation of wood: Dear Rich, Actually “carbonara” in “spaghetti alla carbonara” is a feminine adjective agreed with the implied noun “maniera” as in “spaghetti alla maniera carbonara” where the feminine noun “maniera” has been omitted so that the expression passed into...

Italian Language: stato in luogo, generic expression, indirect object
generic expression, indirect object, complemento: Dear Rich, I am glad to have helped you with your previous questions. As for the indirect object we call “complemento di stato in luogo”, it indicates a place where one stays, like in e.g. “Abito a Genova”(I am living in Genova), “Vivo in campagna”(...

Italian Language: "straight" vs "straight on", diritto, sentences
diritto, sentences, distinction: Hi Rich, No, there is no distinction between the two terms in Italian so andare diritto will be used for both straight and straight on. Attraversi il ponte e vada diritto alla prossima strada Attraversi il ponte e vada diritto. Hope this...

Italian Language: translate from english to italian, huggs and kisses, l ultima volta
huggs and kisses, l ultima volta, charlie hope: Hi Charles, The translation is: Cara Elisa, Ho ricevuto tutte le 9 foto della famiglia e mi è tornato tutto alla memoria. Daniel è molto bello e sembra che vada d accordo con la famiglia. Hanno fissato la data per le nozze o non ancora? ...

Italian Language: translations, rich dialogue, rialto bridge
rich dialogue, rialto bridge, cross the bridge: Dear Rich, Actually the translation “No thanks, but it s very kind for No grazie, molto gentile is incorrect as one must say: “No thanks, you are very kind , not “….but it s very kind“ that would mean “ma questo/ciò/questa cosa è molto gentile”...

Italian Language: Tre Metri Sopra Il Cielo translation, tre metri sopra il cielo, federico moccia
tre metri sopra il cielo, federico moccia, experience section: Hi Georgi, Thank you very much for your question. I am afraid that my translation of Tre Metri Sopra Il Cielo is just something that I have carried out as an activity when I was at university. Therefore, I wouldn t be 100% confident with its accuracy...

Italian Language: follow-up to "bene", "buono"., italian sentences, buon lavoro
italian sentences, buon lavoro, good heart: Hi Ron, To express that something that is good in general, Italians would actually tend to use bello instead. So say, somebody told you that they were planning to get married. You would reply, Che bello! for example which roughly translate as that...

Italian Language: use of "centro", complemento di specificazione, centro di genova
complemento di specificazione, centro di genova, definite article: Dear Rich, In Italian we say “Abito in centro” without including the definite article, if “in centro” in not followed by a genitive as in “Abito nel centro della città” or “Abito nel centro di Ferrara”, for example. This is, in fact, the reason why the...

Italian Language: Use of "in" or "a" with certain words, buon anno nuovo, piazza del duomo
buon anno nuovo, piazza del duomo, hi bob: Hi Bob--this is an interesting question because there are no hard and fast rules about prepositions, and they don t necessarily correspond to the way we use them in English. For this reason, they are usually the last thing that you solidify in your acquisition...

Italian Language: use of "con affetto", complimentary close, indirect object
complimentary close, indirect object, indirect objects: Dear Rich, You are right: “con affetto (with love) when this expression is used as a complimentary close to a letter is exactly a Complemento di Modo because it is describing the manner in which something is done. Instead of “con affetto”, we could...

Italian Language: use of "la" e "là", direct object pronoun, adverb of place
direct object pronoun, adverb of place, correct translation: Dear Rich, you are right: the correct translation for Posso accompagnarla? where accompagnarla is a compound form of the verb accompagnare (to accompany) and the direct object pronoun la (you) should be: Can I accompany you? as the verb “accompany”...

Italian Language: use of: "Occhio però all'acqua alta!", northern adriatic sea, tide peaks
northern adriatic sea, tide peaks, adversative conjunction: Dear Rich, The adversative conjunction “però” in the statement Occhio però all acqua alta! we read in the dialogue “Lost in Venice” has been included as it gives an additional meaning in the sense that the woman that has been asked for an information...

Italian Language: use of preposition "in", use of preposition, classification of words
use of preposition, classification of words, italian states: Dear Rich, It is true that the words città , campagna , and montagna use the preposition in as in:”in città” ( in the city),”in campagna”(in the countryside),”in montagna “ (in the mountains). But there are other words that use the preposition...

Italian Language: use of "prima" and "seconda", feminine nouns, computer course
feminine nouns, computer course, travel directions: Dear Rich, in “Prenda la seconda a destra” (Take the second turning on the right) or “Prenda la prima a destra” (Take the first turning on the right) as well as in “Prenda la prima a sinistra” (Take the first turning on the left) or “Prenda la seconda...

Italian Language: use of "sigor" and "signore", unstressed vowel, masculine noun
unstressed vowel, masculine noun, italian grammar: Dear Rich, first of all in the masculine noun “signor” there is a “troncamento”, i.e. the loss of the unstressed vowel “e” at the end of this word before another word starting with a consonant (like in “signor Rossi”, “il signor ministro”, etc.) or a...

Italian Language: use of "uva", compound nouns, singular noun
compound nouns, singular noun, plural word: Dear Rich, the word uva , which is a feminine singular noun, can only be translated into the English plural word grapes”, unless it is in the compound nouns as in “grape-sugar”( zucchero d uva), “grape-juice”( succo d’uva) and also “Grape Festivals”...

Italian Language: use of "vada", hortatory subjunctive, person plural
hortatory subjunctive, person plural, 3rd person: Dear Rich, In the peremptory order Vada a bordo used very rightly by Captain De Falco the verb vada is just an imperative , as you say. You know, in fact, that in Italian we use the so-called hortatory subjunctive to express three inexistent...

Italian Language: vigile del fuoco, vigile del fuoco, l occhio
vigile del fuoco, l occhio, grammatical category: Dear Rich, It is so: vigile del fuoco is composed of the complemento indiretto del fuoco that follows and modifies the word vigile which is a noun in this context, not an adjective. As for del fuoco , it is not a complemento di qualità ,...

Italian Language: wedding invitation, indirizzo e mail, cerimonia nuziale
indirizzo e mail, cerimonia nuziale, wedding invitation: Hi Sylvia, Thank you for your question. There are just a few things to tweak. The message is: Angela cara, ( name of the bride) e ( name of groom) chiedono l onore della sua presenza nella loro cerimonia nuziale. Siamo feliccismi di invitarLe...

Italian Language: Correct verb usage, present tense, sequence of tenses
present tense, sequence of tenses, subjunctive moods: Hello, first of all I have to point out that in Italian we have many different usages of the Conditional and Subjunctive moods, according to different contexts, so that it is quite impossible to have a guide or advice that can be always used in any context....

Italian Language: diglielo or dirle, happy birtday, teacher answer
happy birtday, teacher answer, italian teacher: Ciao Hamed, you are right. I was not aware about the text. the use dirglielo is correct also referred to a girl id you have to report to her something that is happened: SI è rotto il telefono e ora devo andare a diglielo (to her). if you have to...

Italian Language: Tattoo in italian, accent, confusion
Italian Language: Tattoo in italian, accent, confusion, tattoo

Italian Language: Old /classic Italian song, ti amo, grammar mistakes
ti amo, grammar mistakes, italian song: Ciao Rafik! I ll try with the following song by I CAMALEONTI that is PERCHE TI AMO . let me know. Perché ti amo Perché ti amo e sta nascendo mezzo sentimento Dolce aria da incosciente Fa parte del tuo gioco assurdo Girare intorno a te lo...

Italian Language: Phrase Translation, phrase translation, italian ancestry
phrase translation, italian ancestry, getting a tattoo: Hello, Nulla è reale, tutto è lecito means, literally, nothing is real, everything is legitimate (or allowed ; Niente è vero, tutto è permesso is perfectly correct. I would however put the two phrases together, nulla e vero, tutto e lecito , as it...

Italian Language: Pronouns La and Le, Italian. "Lei" form, formal speech
Italian. "Lei" form, formal speech, polite expressions: Hello Erik, thank you for your question. Here is a tricky matter in Italian language: formal speech and the use of Lei . First of all, I confirm that your translation for the sentence is correct. The use of La instead of ti is because of the...

Italian Language: question about volere bene, indirect object pronouns, indirect objects
indirect object pronouns, indirect objects, direct object: Salve! the verb “volere” followed by the adverb “ bene” as in “voler bene” takes the indirect object, NOT the direct object. Therefore you must say :”Gli voglio bene” or “Le voglio bene” where the pronouns “gli” and “le” are indirect objects, as they...

Italian Language: a song, giulio caccini, dread
giulio caccini, dread, sorrow: Ciao find hereunder: Love, I m departing, and as I go to suffer and to die, I leave behind me she who is my very life But why life say I if she rejoices when my hearts is breaking? What incredible, infinite hardness of heart, that ca give her...

Italian Language: Tattoo in italian, italian expression, ti ti
italian expression, ti ti, perdon: Thank you for asking. It s only a very personal opinion and I can t give any kind of specific advice about tattoos... but I can tell you that I really like the third version in this case: it s shorter, less common, more direct and personal. The other one is...

Italian Language: translation, subjunctive verb, literal translation
subjunctive verb, literal translation, dubbi: Dear Rich, Actually I’ve translated the wording “a seconda che ci si riferisca a” in my sentence “Quanto alla risposta ai tuoi dubbi, devo dirti che in Italiano si usa il singolare o il plurale, a seconda che ci si riferisca ad una montagna o a più montagne”...

Italian Language: translations, del canada, france 3
del canada, france 3, inghilterra: Dear Rich, all your translations are correct as well as what you say in regards to sentence [3] - Abbiamo parlato della situazione della Grecia , where “della Grecia” is a “complemento indiretto” , specifically a “complemento di specificazione” used...

Italian Language: translations, preposition, molti
preposition, molti, france 2: Dear Rich, your translations are correct, apart from the sentence [5] “They will live in Canada for many years” that would mean “Loro abiteranno in Canada per molti anni”, not “Loro abitano in Canada da molti anni”. In fact, “They will live” is a future,...

Italian Language: use of:, demonstrative pronoun, present subjunctive
demonstrative pronoun, present subjunctive, singular form: Dear Rich, I really understand that this matter can be very difficult for you. As for the pronominal particle “ci”, it applies to all intransitive pronominal verbs when they are used in impersonal constructions. In other words, “ci” is just ...

Italian Language: use of "di seguito", masculine noun, adverbial phrase
masculine noun, adverbial phrase, preposition: Dear Rich, you are right: “di seguito” in the phrase you mention is exactly a “Locuzione Avverbiale” (adverbial phrase) that is composed of the preposition “di” placed before the masculine noun “seguito” that translates into English as the adverb “below”....

Italian Language: relative superlative of "molto", word pi, many mountains
word pi, many mountains, correct translation: Dear Rich, the relative superlative of the adjective “molto” is “il più”, i.e. the comparative “più” preceded by the definite article “il”. Such a relative superlative of “molto” can also stand for “la maggior parte” or “il maggior numero di”. ...

Italian Language: use of, singular form, preposition
singular form, preposition, plural form: Dear Rich, the preposition “a” must be included (as part of the articulated preposition) before the noun “risposta” in “quanto alla risposta …” (as for my reponse ...) because “quanto”, when used as a “locuzione prepositiva”, i.e. as an expression placed...

Italian Language: use of, indirect object, preposition
indirect object, preposition, literal translation: Dear Rich, your understanding is correct, apart from a typo such as “to correct” instead of “to connect”. So, as you say: -riferire (transitive verb) means: “to report”, “to relate”, “to link”, “to connect”, NOT “to correct” -riferire (intransitive...

Italian Language: use of "a seconda di" and "secondo", preposition, accordance with the law
preposition, accordance with the law, pronoun: Dear Rich, “Secondo” followed by a noun/pronoun is a preposition that governs a noun /pronoun as in e.g. “Secondo le regole” (in accordance with the rules), “Comportati secondo la legge!”(Behave in accordance with the law!), “Navigare secondo la corrente...

Italian Language: use of "a seconda che", subordinate clause, accordance with the law
subordinate clause, accordance with the law, preposition: Dear Rich, you are correct in thinking that a seconda che (meaning - according to or depending on ) is an Italian subordinating conjunction that is used to connect a dependent clause using the subjunctive verb tense as in “ci si riferisca ad una...

Italian Language: Dialects, tuscany florence, immersion course
tuscany florence, immersion course, lecture centers: Thank you Cornelia and no worries: your question was a matter of Italian culture in general, I just couldn t say anything technical about dialects - such as meaning for sentences and translation - but general questions are ok, as well as questions about...

Italian Language: English c'e la luna a mezzu 'u mare, sicilian dialect, garbage man
sicilian dialect, garbage man, lazy mary: Hello, First of all I must point out that the song you mention is not in Italian, but in Sicilian dialect which sounds quite different from standard Italian spoken everywhere in Italy. It is, in fact, a Sicilian folk song entitled “C è la luna a mezzu...