About Experts Sitemap - Group 32 - Page 58 2014-09-16

Latin: adjective
Dear John, In Latin the adjectives can sometimes modify pronouns like in e.g. “aenobarbus ille” meaning “the read-beard one”. Therefore “It is a blue one” translates as “Caeruleum illud“, if you want to mean ”the blue one”, whereas translates as “Caeruleum...

Latin: composition
Dear John, here’s the correct translation of “Let s not regret it “ and “Let s not regret what we said”: -“Ne nos id paeniteat ” (Let s not regret it). -Ne nos paeniteat id dixisse” or “Ne nos paeniteat quod/quia id diximus”(Let s not regret what...

Latin: English to Latin translation for an inscription
Hello, the sentence Our souls as one can be correctly translated as follows: 1)“Nos ambo sicut unum” (literally, “We both as one [thing]”) 2)“Corda sicut unum nostra” (literally, “Our hearts as one [thing]”) 3)“Nostri sicut unum animi ” (literally,...

Latin: Excrucio
The second is closest to the meaning: I am tortured. Excrucio derives from crux, as indeed does crucifigo (I affix to a cross, I crucify). Both share in the implicit reference to the cross. Nevertheless, excrucio does not specifically refer to...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, 1.In “laeto complerant litora coetu visuri Aeneadas, pars et certare parati” (Virgil, Aeneid,book 5. line 107) the adjective “laeto” in the ablative masculine singular is connected to the subject of the verb complerant as well as to the collective...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.Here’s the correct order for translation of “Hunc etiam post mortem secuti amici et propinqui quid in P. Scipione effecerint, sine lacrimis non queo dicere” (Cicero, De amicitia, 41): “Non queo dicere sine lacrimis quid amici et propinqui...

Latin: grammar
Dear John, 1.In “cuius equi veniant facito studiose requiras (Ovid, Ars Amatoria 1,145) “cuius” (=whose) is an interrogative pronoun in the indirect question clause “cuius equi veniant” (whose horses are coming), while “studiose” is an adverb. ...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, in “Hic tibi quaeratur socii sermonis origo,/ Et moveant primos publica verba sonos “(Ovid, Ars Amatoria 1,144-145) the subject of moveant is “publica verba”, as the order for translation would be the following: ”et publica verba (plural...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.Here’s the literal translation of “...atque ut tamquam a praesentibus coram haberi sermo videretur.” (Cicero, De amicitia, 3): ”and (ATQUE)so that(UT) the conversation(SERMO) seemed (VIDERETUR.Personal construction.Final clause) to be held...

Latin: grammar
Hello, 1.The demonstrative pronouns ILLE and IS can have the same meaning as in “Ille dat puellae donum” or “Is dat puellae donum”, though in good Latin both IS and ILLE could be omitted in these sentences as the subject is implied in the 3rd person...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “mihi accidit, si quid accidit” (Cicero, De amicitia, 10) meaning :” It has happened to me, if something has happened” there is no reason why Cicero should have written “si cui” to match “mihi” instead of “si quid”. In fact, MIHI (dative...

Latin: grammar
Hello, the imperative sentence “Boys, be ambitious” translates as :”Pueri, este ambitiosi” or better “Pueri, estote ambitiosi” with the future imperative “estote” (2nd person plural) instead of the present imperative “este” (2nd person plural). The verb...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, In “...sin autem illa veriora, ut idem interitus sit animorum et corporum...” (Cicero, De amicitia,14) the pronoun “idem” (nominative case) literally means “the same thing” as in: “but (AUTEM) if on the other hand (SIN ) [are] truer those...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “...si mihi ipse confiderem...” (Cicero, De amicitia, 17) “ipse” is somehow equivalent to “ego” which however would not have had the special emphasis of the pronoun “ipse” which is used here to strengthen the subject and then means...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “qualis eorum, qui pauci nominantur, fuit” (Cicero, De amicitia, 22) it is not necessary to add the correlative “talis” somewhere in this sentence, for “qualis” often omits its correlative which is implicit. So, “qualis eorum, qui...

Latin: grammar
Hello, 1.the line “ ....Et potuit multas ipse decere timor..” (Ovid, Ars amatoria, 1. 126) literally means : “Fear (TIMOR) itself (IPSE) could (POTUIT) befit (DECERE ) many (MULTAS)[girls /PUELLAS]..., i.e. “.. fear itself could befit many girls” in...

Latin: Grammar
Hello, here are my remarks about the Vulgate passage “Ecce praecipio tibi confortare et esto robustus noli metuere et noli timere quoniam tecum est Dominus Deus tuus in omnibus ad quaecumque perrexeris” (Joshua 1:9): 1)“in omnibus” stands for “in omnibus...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “sed antiquior et pulchrior et magis a natura ipsa profecta alia causa” (Cicero, De amicitia, 26) the imperfect subjunctive “esset” after “sed” is understood and “alia causa” is the subject of this “esset”. In fact, “an esset hoc quidem...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “amicitiam non spe mercedis adducti sed quod omnis eius fructus in ipso amore inest, expetendam putamus.”(Cicero, De amicitia, 31) here’s the correct order for translation: “putamus amicitiam expetendam [esse](passive periphrastic) non...

Latin: Grammar
Hello, In “Idem facit Caesar equitatumque omnem .......praemittit, qui videant, quas in partes hostes iter faciant” (Caesar, De Bello Gallico, book 1,chapter 15) there is a “concordatio ad sensum”, i.e. a grammatical connection according to sense where...

Latin: grmmar
Hello, actually the expression “iniuriam sibi factam putare” literally means :” to think (PUTARE) that an affront/insult/offence (INIURIAM) has been done (FACTAM ESSE where ESSE is implied) against oneself (SIBI)”, i.e. “ to feel insulted . Anyway,...

Latin: Indirect statement
Hello, both “Marcus dicit id facile esse “ (Marcus says that it is easy) and “Marcus dicit id melius futurum esse” ( Marcus says that it will be better) are correct. The only thing I can add is that in “ Marcus dicit id melius futurum esse” you can...

Latin: Latin Help
Hello, By strength, I will conquer can be translated as follows: 1)“Fortitudine vincam”, if “strength” is used in the sense of fortitude and courage shown over a long period in undertaking hardship. 2)“Vi vincam”, if “strength” is used in the...

Latin: Latin phrase from a British coin
Hello, the Latin legend on the Franklin Press token of 1794 Sic oritur doctrina surgetque libertas“ literally means: 1.”Thus learning is born and liberty will arise” or: 2. In this manner knowledge rises and liberty will dawn” (See parsing...

Latin: Latin Pronunciation Examples
In the Classical pronunciation, typically used in schools, which represents an approximation of the pronunciation used around 50 B.C. to A.D. 50 (the period of Cicero, Caesar, and Vergil): 1) RAY-boos 2) Ad-WHERE-sees 3) WE-rays ah-KWEE-roh eh-OON-doh...

Latin: Latin Pronunciation "V"
As I indicated, I am giving you the standard Classical pronunciation, as used in schools, which attempts to approximate the high period of Latin literature, roughly the period of Cicero, Caesar, and Vergil (50 B.C. to A.D. 50). At this time, v was a consonant...

Latin: Latin translation
Hello, 1)No, “Fortitudine vincam” does not mean “By endurance, I conquer”, but “By strength/fortitude I will conquer”. If you want to have “By endurance, I will conquer”, you must say “Patienti vincam fortitudine” where the adjective “patienti” (ablative...

Latin: Mediaeval Latin "Villare"
Although villa in the meaning of country-house, estate, or farm, and villula in the meaning of a small country-house, estate, or farm ( -ula being a diminutive suffix) occurs in Classical Latin in both prose and poetry (Cicero, Horace, etc.), nevertheless,...

Latin: Translation
Hello, Actually such a song title “Verum Aeternus” is absolutely wrong as these two Latin words cannot go together as they should agree in gender, according to Latin grammar, and thus they should sound as Verum Aeternum (NOT Aeternus ). In fact,...

Latin: Translation help
Hello, first of all in “Fortitudine vinco” the word “fortitudine” ( Ablative of Instrument of the feminine noun “fortitudo”, 3rd declension) corresponds exactly to “through strength , while “vinco” means “I conquer”. As for “Strength overcomes weakness”,...

Latin: Translation of a movie quote
Hello, here are three correct translations of “What we do in life echoes in eternity”: 1-“Quod in vita facimus, in aeternum resonat “ [literal] 2- Ut vivimus, sic in aeternum resonamus [as an aphorism, literally meaning “As we live, so we echoe...

Latin: composition
Dear John, 1.“This is my answer: not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more” (Shakespeare , Julius Caesar, Act III, Scene 2, line 1554-1556) translates correctly as follows: ”Hoc meum est responsum: non me Caesarem amavisse minus, sed...

Latin: exhortation to oneself
Dear John, “Numquam obliviscar” can mean either “May I never forget” or “I will never forget”, according to the context that however there is not here. In fact, “obliviscar” can be either the 1st person singular of the hortatory subjunctive meaning...

Latin: expression
Dear John, Both “Quid agis?” and “Quid facis?” correspond to What do you do? . Note that the 2nd person pronoun “tu” is omitted because it is implied in the verb forms “agis/facis” which are just a 2nd person singular. Anyway, if the English “you”...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.the passages “ne necesse sit unum sollicitum esse pro pluribus” (Cicero, De amicitia, 45) and “amor exoriatur necesse est” (48) show the two different constructions of the clause depending on the impersonal form “necesse est” which, in...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, 1. In “Etsi nullus erit pulvis, tamen excute nullum” (Ovid, Ars Amatoria 1, 151) “nullum” is an adjective that implies the masculine noun “pulverem” which is the accusative of “pulvis” that appears in “Etsi nullus est pulvis”. In short,...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “concedetur profecto verum esse, ut bonos boni diligant adsciscantque sibi quasi propinquitate coniunctos atque natura.” (Cicero, De amicitia, 50) “quasi propinquitate coniunctos atque natura” literally means:”as (QUASI) joined /connected...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “eius enim est istorum quidque, qui vicit viribus” (Cicero, De amicitia, 55) your order for translation ” enim (for) quidque (each) istorum (of those things) est (is) eius (of him), qui (who) vicit viribus (wins with strength) is correct...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, 1.In “ Hos aditus Circusque novo praebebit amori,/Sparsaque sollicito tristis harena foro (Ovid, Ars Amatoria 1, 164) the subjects are exactly “ Circus” and “harena” in two different sentences respectively, i.e.: “And the Circus (CIRCUSQUE)...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “rursum autem recte factis commodisque amicorum necesse erit angi dolere invidere.” (Cicero, De amicitia, 59) the present infinitives “angi” and “dolere”, as verbs of feeling, take the Ablative of Cause, while “invidere” requires the...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, 1. In “Quid, modo cum belli navalis imagine Caesar / Persidas induxit Cecropiasque rates? ( Ovid, Ars Amatoria 1, 171-172) the meaning of the neuter interrogative quid is “what? or “what do I say?” as an expression of wonder that refers...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, In “Parthe, dabis poenas: Crassi gaudete sepulti, /Signaque barbaricas non bene passa manus./ Ultor adest...” (Ovid, Ars Amatoria 1, 179-181) meaning:” O Parthian, you will pay the penalty: rejoice, o buried soldiers of Crassus, and you military...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “et iudicare difficile est sane nisi expertum” (Cicero, De amicitia, 62) the adverb “sane” goes with “difficile”, meaning “very”/”certainly”. Also, it is correct to expand “nisi expertum” into a clause nisi iudicare est expertum ...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “....quae pertinent omnia ad eam, quam iam dudum tracto, constantiam.” (Cicero, De amicitia, 65) the feminine accusative adjective “eam” goes with “constantiam”, meaning “that steadfastness”, as you say. It is just a matter of style...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.in “eoque magis, si habere se putant, quod officiose et amice et cum labore aliquo suo factum queant dicere” (Cicero, De amicitia, 71) your order for a literal translation for the “si” clause is correct, as “si(if) putant (they think) se...

Latin: Grammar
Hello, here’s the construction of “me profugum comites deseruere mei “(Ovid, Tristia, book 1, poem 5, line 64):”Mei comites deseruere me profugum” literally meaning : “My (MEI) companions /friends (COMITES) abandoned (DESERUERE, i.e. DESERUERUNT) me...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, please note that “Joannes est nomen eius” for “John is his name”, as it appears in the official motto for the island of Puerto Rico whose formal name is San Juan Bautista de Puerto Rico” with reference to the name that Christopher Columbus...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.in “Quae tamen si tolerabiles erunt, ferendae sunt” (Cicero, De amicitia, 78) “quae” is the nominative feminine plural of the relative pronoun “qui” which refers to the previous nouns “iurgia, maledicta, contumeliae” and agrees with the...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.in “Quod cum optimum maximumque sit” (Cicero, De amicitia, 84) the neuter relative pronoun “quod” does not refer to “honestas, gloria, tranquillitas animi atque iucunditas” nor to “societas” in the previous sentence, but to “beata vita”...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, 1.In “Ultor adest, primisque ducem profitetur in annis, /Bellaque non puero tractat agenda puer” (Ovid, Ars amatoria, 1, 181-182) the subject of tractat is “puer” . Here’s the literal translation: ”An avenger (ultor) is here (adest), and...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.in “Verum ergo illud est quod a Tarentino Archyta, ut opinor, dici solitum nostros senes commemorare audivi ab aliis senibus auditum” (Cicero, De amicitia, 88) there is 1)a main clause (Verum ergo illud est); 2)a relative clause (quod....audivi);3)...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “Quid enim potest esse tam flexibile, tam devium quam animus eius qui ad alterius non modo sensum ac voluntatem sed etiam vultum atque nutum convertitur? (Cicero, De amicitia, 93) it is also correct to use the reflexive “se convertit”...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, In “Cum tibi sint fratres, fratres ulciscere laesos:/ Cumque pater tibi sit, iura tuere patris “ (Ovid, Ars Amatoria 1,195-197) the conjunction “cum” means “since”, the plural “fratres” indicates the Roman citizens who are figuratively brothers...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “Omnino est amans sui virtus” (Cicero, De amicitia, 98) the genitive “sui” (3rd person reflexive pronoun, literally meaning “of itself /herself/himself”) depends on the present participle “amans” used as an adjective. In short, here’s...

Latin: which latin translation is correct?
Hello, “Mihi ipsi pessimus sum inimicus” is the best translation for “I am my own worst enemy”, just related to a male person. This Latin phrase is, in fact, an adaptation of a quotation from Cicero, De Finibus Bonorum et Malorum (About the Ends of Goods...

Latin: translation
Hello, “Evangelium secundum Ioannem” is the correct translation for “the Gospel according to John , but you can also say “Sanctum Evangelium secundum Ioannem” meaning “The Holy Gospel according to John”. As for the accusative IOANNEM (without the H...

Latin: Translation
Dear John, First note that in “Lupus et Canis Saginatus” which is nothing but an adaptation of the original Latin text of Phaedrus fable “Lupus ad canem”: 1)“ut videtur” must be translated “as it seems” . The passive form “videor” is used here...

Latin: Vulgata
Moysi is the genitive (possessive) case of the name Moses. Liber primus Moysi vocabitur Genesis : The first book of Moses is called Genesis. With the verb esse, the imperfect erat is even more commonly used for past time than fuit. In Latin,...

Latin: composition
Dear John, here are my answers: 1)“cuilibet” (dative singular of the indefinite pronoun “quilibet” ) means “anyone” in “Cuilibet promptum est gloriari...” literally meaning:”For/To anyone (cuilibet) it is easy (promptum est) to boast (gloriari)..”,...

Latin: composition
Dear John, the construction of “make a person to do..” translates as “efficere ut..” or “facere ut” + the subjunctive, according to the consecutio temporum (Sequence of tenses). Therefore “You make me feel alive” can be translated as :”Efficis ut vigeam”...

Latin: Follow-up question
Dear Robert, please note that in “una domus erat, idem victus, isque communis” (Cicero, De Amicitia, 103) the pronoun “is” refers to “victus” (diet/food), just to emphasize that Laelius and Scipio ate the same food (idem victus) at the same table (isque...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “callidus ille et occultus ne se insinuet, studiose cavendum est” (Cicero, De amicitia, 99) the masculine pronoun “ille” is the subj. in the ne ... clause, and the adjectives callidus and occultus modify ille , so that the...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.You are right in saying that in “maxime quidem optandum est, ut cum aequalibus possis, quibuscum tamquam e carceribus emissus sis, cum isdem ad calcem, ut dicitur, pervenire.” (Cicero, De amicitia, 101) “cum aequalibus” and “cum isdem” are...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “Numquam illum ne minima quidem re offendi, quod quidem senserim” (Cicero, Laelius sive De amicitia, 103) there is no antecedent of “quod” because the “quod” clause is a substantive clause with quod + the potential subjunctive “senserim”...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, Here’s the literal translation of “Sunt his alii multum dispares, simplices et aperti, qui nihil ex occulto, nihil de insidiis agendum putant, veritatis cultores, fraudis inimici, itemque alii, qui quidvis perpetiantur, cuivis deserviant, dum...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, note that in “quod si ita est, ut neque quisquam nisi bonus vir et omnes boni beati sint, quid philosophia magis colendum aut quid est virtute divinius? “ (Cicero, De finibus bonorum et malorum, book 3, section 76): 1)the conjunction “ut”,...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, Actually the pronoun “quisque” takes very often a singular verb which agrees with this singular pronoun. Anyway, “quisque” can also have the so-called “concordatio ad sensum”, i.e. a grammatical connection according to sense where agreement...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, in “Quod est, eo decet uti et, quicquid agas, agere pro viribus” (Cicero,De Senectute, 27) the relative clause “quod est” is nothing but the antecedent of “eo” in the main clause “eo decet uti” which has no subject as there is the impersonal...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.Here’s the literal translation of “Sed tamen nostra legens non multum a Peripateticis dissidentia, quoniam utrique Socratici et Platonici volumus esse, de rebus ipsis utere tuo iudicio... (Cicero, De Officiis, I, 2): ”But (sed) however...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, 1.In “Quid hic faciet, si poterit, iratus, qui cum suscensere nemini posset, omnibus bonis fuerit inimicus? (Cicero, Philippica Tertia, chapter 12, section 30) the word iratus (meaning angered/ enraged/angry; past participle of Irascor, used...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, 1.In “Ergo erit illa dies, qua tu, pulcherrime rerum, quattuor in niveis aureus ibis equis (Ovid, Ars Amatoria 1, 213-214) the adjective aureus is connected to the subject pronoun “tu” (2nd person singular). As for “ibis”, it is the...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, 1.In “Propter quod consolamini invicem et aedificate alterutrum, sicut et facitis”(1 Thessalonians 5,11) the expression “sicut et” means exactly “just as”, so that:”sicut et facitis” means:” just as you are doing “. In short, “et”(= just) in...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “non ut interpretes “(Cicero, De Officiis, I, 6) the word “interpretes” is not a verb, but the nominative plural of the masculine noun “interpres” (3rd declension) meaning “translator/interpreter” so that “non ut interpretes” means “not...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “Tum autem aut anquirunt aut consultant …. conducat id necne, de quo deliberant; quae deliberatio omnis in rationem utilitatis cadit....” (Cicero, De Officiis I, 9) the relative pronoun “quo” refers to its antecedent “id” and then...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “... unum hoc animal sentit, quid sit quod deceat, in factis dictisque qui modus.”(Cicero, De Officiis, I, 14) the verb “est” is just understood in the “qui” clause, so that “in factis dictisque qui modus est” literally means what (qui)...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “Quibus vitiis declinatis, quod in rebus honestis et cognitione dignis operae curaeque ponetur,id iure laudabitur...” (Cicero, De Officiis, I, 19) the relative pronoun “quod” is the antecedent of “id”; “quod” is the subject in the “quod”...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “....credamusque, quia fiat, quod dictum est, appellatam fidem.” (Cicero, De Officiis, I, 23) the infinitive “esse” is just understood after “appellatam”, and the relative “quod dictum est” works as the subject of “fiat” in the causal...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In Nulla sancta societas/Nec fides regni est ( Cicero, De Officiis, I, 26), which is a quotation from Ennius, the genitive “regni” depends on the verb est in the sense that no sacred fellowship nor faith/loyalty are typical of kingship...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, actually this is a duplicate question that I ve already answered. Anyway, here s my previous answer: 1.In Nulla sancta societas/Nec fides regni est ( Cicero, De Officiis, I, 26), which is a quotation from Ennius, the genitive “regni”...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “ nam hoc ipsum ita iustum est, quod recte fit, si est voluntarium (Cicero, De Officiis, I, 28) the relative pronoun “quod” refers to its antecedent ”hoc ipsum”, so that the order for translation would be as follows:”nam hoc ipsum, quod...

Latin: grammar
Hello, the sentence The eagle flies high in the sky “ can be translated correctly as follows: -“Alte volat aquila in caelo” where the positive adverb “alte” corresponds to “high”. or better: -“Altissime volat aquila in caelo” where the superlative...

Latin: Ceriolum
You didn t indicate the Greek word to which the Latin word was associated, but ceriolum is used in Late Latin for a small wax taper. The derivation is from the Classical Latin cereus, meaning a wax taper, with the diminutive suffix added. Other Late...

Latin: First Periphrastic Construction
You are correct. A participle, as a verbal adjective, does agree with the noun or pronoun that it modifies. In this instance, sumpturi is nominative masculine plural, modifying the implied nominative masculine plural subject of sumus ( WE are ) in the...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.Note that in “Iam illis promissis standum non esse quis non videt, quae coactus quis metu, quae deceptus dolo promiserit? (Cicero, De Officiis, I, 32): (a) the indirect object “illis promissis” is in the dative as it depends upon “standum”...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “Existunt etiam saepe iniuriae calumnia quadam et nimis callida sed malitiosa iuris interpretatione (Cicero, De Officiis,I, 33)the word “iniuriae” (f. pl.)is the subject, while ”calumia” and “ interpretatione” are abl. of cause, for the...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “Cum vero de imperio decertatur belloque quaeritur gloria (Cicero, De Officiis, I, 38) the verb “decertatur” is used impersonally and therefore there is no subject. As for “bello”, it is just an abl. of means of “quaeritur”, while...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.Here’s the literal translation of “Videndum est ...., primum ne obsit benignitas et iis ipsis, quibus benigne videbitur fieri et ceteris, deinde.....”(Cicero, De Officiis, I, 42): ”It must be seen to it (videndum est) first (primum) that...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “Quodsi ea, quae utenda acceperis…”(Cicero, De Officiis,I,48) the “quae” clause literally means:”those things (ea) that (quae, connected to its antecedent “ea”) you will have received (acceperis, future perfect) so that they must be used...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, 1) Note that in “Hic est Euphrates, praecinctus harundine frontem:/ Cui coma dependet caerula, Tigris erit” (Ovid, Ars Amatoria, I, 223-224): (a) the past participle “praecinctus” governs the accusative of Specification “frontem”, aka Greek...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “Ac latissime quidem patens hominibus inter ipsos, omnibus inter omnes societas haec est (Cicero, De Officiis, I, 51) “hominibus” is a dative as the sentence literally means: ”And so (ac ..quidem) this (haec) is (est) the association/society/fellowship...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “Ut enim ab illa infinita discedatur (Cicero, De Officiis I, 53) the passive “discedatur” (present subjunctive) is an impersonal construction literally meaning:”it goes away “, i.e. ”one goes away”/”you go away”. Note that the 3rd person...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “....ut boni ratiocinatores officiorum esse possimus et addendo deducendoque videre, quae reliqui summa fiat, …”(Cicero, De Officiis,I,59) “possimus” is understood after “videre”. As for a literal translation of the “quae” clause, here...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1. Note that in “....et ea, quae videntur acerba, quae multa et varia in hominum vita fortunaque versantur, ita ferre“ (Cicero, De Officiis, I, 67): (a) “ea” can be considered the antecedent of both “quae”, though the second quae in ...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.Here’s the literal translation for “Quae faciliora sunt philosophis, quo minus multa patent in eorum vita, quae fortuna feriat “ (Cicero, De Officiis, I, 73): ”Which things (quae) are (sunt) easier (faciliora) for the philosophers (philosophis),...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “...temere autem in acie versari et manu cum hoste confligere immane quiddam et beluarum simile est” (Cicero, De Officiis, I, 81) the two present infinitives “versari” and “confligere” serve as the subject. As for “et” before “beluarum”,...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.Here’s the literal translation for “…. alii studiosi optimi cuiusque videantur ….(Cicero, De Officiis,I,85):”…others (alii ) seem (videantur, depending on “ut” in “evenit ut”) partial to /having a liking for (studiosi) the patricians (optimi...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, In …Miserrima...est ambitio honorumque contentio,de qua praeclare apud eundem est Platonem..” (Cicero, De Officiis,I,87) you are correct in thinking that “ambitio honorumque contentio” is treated as a singular feminine. This happens because...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “….Quae primum bene parta sit nullo neque turpi quaestu neque odioso,…” (Cicero, De Officiis, I, 92)the double negative “nullo” and “neque … neque…” depends on the fact that “neque…neque” can be found with a preceding negative, which,...

Latin: Conjunction Introducing Purpose and Result Clauses
First of all, ut ne is never used. In a negative clause, ne is used alone, without ut. Otherwise, the proper Latin construction depends upon whether the clause in question is a purpose close or a result clause. In English, purpose clauses are introduced...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.“Haec ita intellegi possumus existimare ex eo decoro quod poetae sequuntur” (Cicero, De Officiis, I, 97) literally means:”From (ex) that (eo) decorum/propriety (decoro) which (quod) poets (poetae) follow (sequuntur) we may (possumus) infer...

Latin: Grammar
Dear John, Actually in one of my previous answer I have said that the construction of “make a person to do..” translates as “efficere ut..” or “facere ut” + the subjunctive, according to the consecutio temporum (Sequence of tenses)”. Also, I’ve written...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “….ut et illud, quod … , decorum quam late fusum sit appareat et hoc, quod spectatur in uno quoque genere virtutis “(Cicero, De Officiis, I, 98) you are right in thinking that “appareat” is used impersonally and “quam late fusum sit” refers...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “….qui appetitus longius evagantur et tamquam exultantes sive cupiendo sive fugiendo non satis a ratione retinentur, ii sine dubio finem et modum transeunt” (Cicero, De Officiis,book I,chapter 102) the plural masculine nominative “qui”...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “Erat in L. Crasso, in L. Philippo multus lepos…” (Cicero, De Officiis, book 1, chapter 108) the masculine singular nominative “lepos” (or “lepor”, 3rd declension) means “wit”, “humour”, and agrees with “multus”, so that “Erat in L. Crasso,...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “… ideo quia nihil decet invita Minerva, ut aiunt, id est adversante et repugnante natura” (Cicero, De Officiis, I, 110) the expression “id est …” explains the ablative absolute “invita Minerva”, literally meaning “Minerva being unwilling”,...

Latin: grammar
Dear Robert, 1.In “… ut nonnulli omissa imitatione maiorum suum quoddam institutum consequantur” (Cicero, De Officiis, I, 116) “omissa imitatione” is exactly an abl. abs. literally meaning “…imitation (imitatione) of the ancestors (maiorum) having been...

Latin: INRI
Hello, The N in INRI, which are the initial letters for the Latin title that Pontius Pilate wrote over the head of Jesus Christ on the cross, stands for “Nazarenus”, as we read in the Latin text of John 19:19:“Iesus Nazarenus Rex Iudaeorum”(Bible Vulgate,...

Latin: Translation
Hello, “The secrets of a friend” is the correct translation of “Arcana amici” where the neuter plural “arcana” means “the secrets” and the genitive singular “amici” means “of a friend”. (Read more below). Note that this expression derives from a quotation...

Latin: Anytime, f 14 tomcat, latin translation
f 14 tomcat, latin translation, public archive: You could render that thought by Aliquando, dilecta. ************************************************************ ************************************************************ Since you designed this question public, the answer will go into the public...

Latin: Archeological translation, barbara mcmanus, national archaeological museum
barbara mcmanus, national archaeological museum, exhibit credits: Hello, first of all the Latin inscription DOM[I]NVS ANCILLAE SUAE literally means THE MASTER TO HIS SLAVE GIRL, which in English can be rendered as “From the Master to his slave girl”, although “From the Master” does not correspond exactly to DOMINUS that...

Latin: Architecture Motto ..., young architects, spanner in the works
young architects, spanner in the works, latin terminology: Hello, the phrase “IUVENES ARCHITECTI LUDENTES “ or with a different word order “IUVENES LUDENTES ARCHITECTI “, just meaning “Young architects/designers at play”, is correct, as well as the terminology which belongs to classical Latin. As for the...

Latin: Architecture Motto, correct translation, declension
correct translation, declension, latin terms: Hello, If “Architects at Play” means that the architects are playing and have fun, you could say “Ludentes architecti” or “Architecti ludentes” with a different word order which in Latin can be variable. Note that “ludentes” is the participle present...

Latin: Assistance With Phrase, strength god, homework questions
strength god, homework questions, dative: Hello, Just yesterday someone asked me the translation of the same text, but I declined to answer such a question as the phrase was for a tattoo and I don’t like tattoos so that in my ‘Instructions to Questioner’ which appear on the ‘Ask a Question’ page...

Latin: Asunder, homo, thanx
homo, thanx, latin: Hello, The sentence “Let no man of woman born put us asunder” is in Latin: “Nullus homo ex muliere natus nos separet”. or better : « Nemo ex muliere natus nos separet ». Best regards Maria _________________________________________ NULLUS...

Latin: Athenaeum Pontificium Regina Apostolorum, athenaeum pontificium regina apostolorum, pontifical university
athenaeum pontificium regina apostolorum, pontifical university, genitive: Dear Simon, “Athenaeum Pontificium Regina Apostolorum” means: “Papal (or ‘Pontifical ) University Queen of the Apostles” -ATHENAEUM (nominative neuter) is ‘University ; -PONTIFICIUM (adjective neuter agreed with ‘Athenaeum ) is ‘Papal / Pontifical...

Latin: Bea ti in xto, roman x, east arm
roman x, east arm, xto: The phrase is Beati in Christo [Blessed in Christ]. Xto is an abbreviation for Christo, with the X being the Greek letter chi (which looks like a Roman X), representing the sound CH. It is the same with the abbreviation Xmas, wherein X is not the Roman...

Latin: Beautiful..., feminine noun, poetic translation
feminine noun, poetic translation, bellus: Hello, If you want to repeat the same adjective, here are the correct translations: -“Pulchrum cor” (A Beautiful Heart) -“Pulchra mens” (A Beautiful Mind) -“Pulcher animus”(A Beautiful Soul) -“Pulchra mulier”(A Beautiful Woman) But, if you are...

Latin: Believe in Yourself, exact translations, accurate translation
exact translations, accurate translation, classical latin: Credo with this meaning in classical Latin takes the dative rather than the accusative. Although there are always a number of possible versions when going from one language to another (there are no exact translations, after all, as all languages are different),...

Latin: Benedictus and/or Benedictum?, pope benedict xvi, pope benedict
pope benedict xvi, pope benedict, benedict xvi: Latin is an inflected language; that is, the endings of the words denote the syntactical relationship of words in the sentence. English retains some inflectional endings too, e.g., apple/apples, he/him/his. Benedictus is the nominative, or subject, case....

Latin: Bias and Interference, public archive, interference
public archive, interference, bias: You could render that thought: Liber intercessione, liber inclinatione. ************************************************************ ************************************************************ Since you designed this question public, the answer will...

Latin: Bibliography, Etymological dictionary, online etymological dictionary, carmen arvale
online etymological dictionary, carmen arvale, etymological dictionary of latin: Hello, glad to have helped you. As for a bibliography on the grammar of the Fibula Praenestina, Duenos Vase, Ficoroni cista, Carmen Arvale and Carmen Saliare, I’m sorry, but such a bibliography could be found only in classical studies Reviews and in Classics...

Latin: Blood of my blood, flesh of my flesh, possessive adjective
flesh of my flesh, possessive adjective, flesh of my flesh blood of my blood: Hello, here’s the translation of “Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood (family relation): “Carnis meae caro, sanguis sanguinis mei”. As for 2008, I confirm that it translates as MMVIII (Roman cardinal number). Best, Maria _______________________________________...

Latin: Blood is thicker than water, latin declension, latin sentence
latin declension, latin sentence, latin blood: Hello, The literal translation of Blood is thicker than water is in Latin as follows: “Densior est sanguis quam aqua ». I think however you do not want a literal translation, but the Latin sentence that is equivalent to the English idiom which...

Latin: Brief Translation, latin translation, kind consideration
latin translation, kind consideration, sorbet: Hi Angelus, “Life sucks, then you die! can be translated into Latin as follows: “Sorbet te vita et opprimit, deinde moreris! or Sorbet te vita et opprimit, deinde peris! Have a nice day. Maria ________________________________________ NB....

Latin: "Brutum fulmen Pape Sixti V", pope sixtus v, father confessor
pope sixtus v, father confessor, pontifex maximus: Hello Simon, Glad to hearing from you! I m fine as well as my daughter who is yet in London where she is studying at the School of Oriental and African Studies as she won a Fellowship award, which will fund her Ph.D. studies. I also have been to see...

Latin: Business motto translation, latin declension, de nihilo nihil
latin declension, de nihilo nihil, business motto: Hello, the sentence Because everybody is different can be literally translated as follows: - Quia dissimilis est unusquisque . or : - Quia pro se quisque dissimilis est . Anyway, it would be better to remove the preposition QUIA(‘because ) as...

Latin: A bit of advice please Maria., grammar point, grammar books
grammar point, grammar books, latin grammar: Hi Stephen, I m fine, thanks. First of all, your translation is correct. The original text of Caesar s “Gallic War” (book 4, chapter 21, paragraph 6) reads as follows: “Quibus auditis, liberaliter pollicitus hortatusque ut in ea sententia permanerent,...

Latin: bonum diffisivum sui, st thomas aquinas, aquinas summa
st thomas aquinas, aquinas summa, latin maxim: Hello, First of all the correct Latin maxim we read in St.Thomas Aquinas “Summa Theologica” (A treatise on Theology) is bonum diffusivum sui which means exactly “the good is diffusive of itself” or “ the good diffuses itself “. St.Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274,...

Latin: In his book "The Quantum Brain",..., e pluribus unum, ablative case
e pluribus unum, ablative case, jeffrey satinover: FOLLOW UP: I can hazard a guess: maybe Jeffrey Satinover meant to write in Latin:”EX UNO PLURIMA”,i.e. “Out of one(brain), a lot of things”. _________________________________________ Hello, I also take this strange sentence to be a play upon the...

Latin: Carpe Diem vs Carpe ?, latin english dictionary, accusative case
latin english dictionary, accusative case, lyric poet: Hello, actually “Carpe diem”, the famous quote from Horace, means in Latin exactly what you say, i.e. “Seize the moment”, as the Latin word ‘dies (meaning literally ‘day ) really refers to transience of our life, and so to the moment we must enjoy...

Latin: Carpe Diem, english alphabet, capital letters
english alphabet, capital letters, lower case: You write it in Latin the same way you do in English. In fact, the written English alphabet is taken from Latin. This is known as minuscule (printed lower case): Carpe diem. Sometimes you see monuments with an inscription all in capital letters, which...

Latin: Church translation, great roman poet, horace odes
great roman poet, horace odes, car decal: Hello, If you really want to follow Horace’s quotation and then say “Seize the day in the name of the Lord” in Latin, here’s the translation : “Carpe diem in nomine Domini”. Please note that: -CARPE is ‘seize’ -DIEM is ‘the day’ -IN NOMINE...

Latin: A Cicero(?) quote, moral guidance, english phrase
moral guidance, english phrase, son marcus: Hello, The English phrase Practise kindness with diligence” is not a precise quotation from Cicero, but an adaptation of some selected passages from an ethical work by Cicero, i.e. “On Moral Duties”(De officiis), book I, passim, where the author discusses...

Latin: Clarification concerning my thoughts, last illusion, goddess of hope
last illusion, goddess of hope, roman mythology: Hello Heidi, Sorry, but I have to repeat that, if you have lost ‘everything’, i.e. ‘all things’, you cannot have illusion, at all. If on the contrary you mean that the last illusion is the fact that you believe that NOT everything is lost, in Latin...

Latin: Confirmation of latin translation, strength and honour, correct translation
strength and honour, correct translation, fortitudo: Hi, The correct translation for Strength and Honour is : Fortitudo et Honor”, where both of the nouns are in the nominative case. As for ‘honoris’ , it is the genitive singular of the noun ‘honor’ (3rd declension)and therefore I m wondering why...

Latin: Correct latin phrase, parallel phrases, latin phrase
parallel phrases, latin phrase, hawaiian kingdom: Hello, Glad to help you. So, the phrase “A kingdom once, a kingdom still” is in Latin: - Quondam regnum, regnum adhuc or - Quondam regnum, etiam nunc regnum In the first sentence I used „adhuc” as it is better than ‘hodie , while in the second...

Latin: Correct translation?, correct phrase, correct translation
correct phrase, correct translation, o lord: They stand in need of some correction. I have indicated the correct phrase in capital letters beneath. Domine, nos precor O Lord, we beseech thee. DOMINE, NOS PRECAMUR. Domine, nos implorare O Lord, we implore thee. DOMINE, NOS IMPLORAMUS. ...

Latin: Correct translation?, possessive adjective, correct phrase
possessive adjective, correct phrase, correct translation: Yes, it is correct. In fact Patris est filius is just the translation of He is his father s son . The only English word which has not been translated is the possessive adjective his (Latin, sui ) that however is absolutely superfluous in Latin....

Latin: Courage/Belief, faith belief, declension
faith belief, declension, fortitudo: Hello, Here are the translations you asked me. 1. Courage (as in bravery and strength of character) = VIRTUS as ‘bravery’, ‘courage’; FORTITUDO as ‘strength of character’. For example: -“Magna eius est VIRTUS (nominative)” (His courage is great);...

Latin: cambridge latin course question., cambridge latin course, course question
cambridge latin course, course question, accusative: Well, you got all of the rest of the sentence, which was more difficult! Actually, it should be auctor (in the nominative) because that is the subject of the verb nolebat. The originator of the crime is initiating the action of the verb (not experiencing...

Latin: case ending of number., distributive adjective, distributive adjectives
distributive adjective, distributive adjectives, senae: Hello Stephen, glad to read your message after a long time. As for your question, the answer is less complex than it seems. In fact SENAE (nominative feminine plural agreed with the noun LITTERAE, letters) is a distributive adjective which has been...

Latin: Every choice has consequences, latin declension, danish guy
latin declension, danish guy, habet: Hi Klaus, The English translation of the Danish motto you mention can be translated into Latin as follows: “Unaquaeque optio exitum habet ». or with a different word order: Exitum unaquaeque habet optio . In fact: -UNAQUAEQUE (nominative...

Latin: "christ give me strength", latin translations, declension
latin translations, declension, mihi: Hello, Christe, da mihi fortitudinem! or “Iesu Christe, da mihi fortitudinem!” are the Latin translations of “ Christ give me strength”. All the best, Maria _______________________________________ -Christ = CHRISTE (vocative case of CHRISTUS, 2nd.declension)...

Latin: cicero, de senectute, voluptas, de amicitia
voluptas, de amicitia, time of life: Ah, Cicero, all too many lack his practical Roman wisdom these days. The De Senectute (On Old Age) has been one of his most popular treatises, together with De Amicitia (On Friendship). Here is a rendition of the passage quoted: Is there love in...

Latin: cicero & ovid, latin passages, tenses of the verbs
latin passages, tenses of the verbs, voluptas: Hello Karin, First of all I have to point out that both these Latin passages are only adaptations of Cicero s De Senectute and Ovid s Metamorphoses, not the real text of these works. As for your translation of the first passage, it is quite correct,...

Latin: classical / mediaeval, st thomas aquinas, albertus magnus
st thomas aquinas, albertus magnus, renaissance perspective: Although Latin has been quite flexible to meet the needs of 2500 years, it did have a classical period, a high period, to which everyone ultimately returns to calibrate. Unfortunately, we don t have a similar standard in English, except a vague standard...

Latin: club motto, club motto, latin motto
club motto, latin motto, brisbane australia: Hello Chris, Your mail is humorous and therefore I decided to translate this slogan which seems to be linked to the drought you currently have in Brisbane. I’m wondering however whether you will change this motto when the drought will cease. Anyway...

Latin: common CL words, provinces of the roman empire, vernacular dialects
provinces of the roman empire, vernacular dialects, latin roots: Hello Gregory, First of all the conjunctions ut, sed, tamen, autem were certainly used in Latin in the 1st.-2nd. cent. AD, when there was not yet Vulgar Latin, i.e. the vernacular dialects of the Latin language spoken in the provinces of the Roman Empire....

Latin: We came, we saw, we conquered., roman senate, julius caesar
roman senate, julius caesar, question subject: Hello, “Venimus, Vidimus, Vicimus” (We came, we saw, we conquered ) is correct. As you know perfectly well, it is in fact an adaptation of the phrase (Veni, Vidi, Vici) that Julius Caesar is said to have written to Roman Senate after he defeated at...

Latin: cornelivs-lvcivs-scipio-barbatvs-cnaivod...., roman consuls, vatican museums
roman consuls, vatican museums, ablative case: Hi again Violante, first of all CNAIVOD means literally ‘from Cnaeus and is an old ablative case. In fact in early Latin the ending of the ablative singular of the 2nd.declension was -OD which became –O in classical Latin. Moreover the vowel –i-...

Latin: correct me??, neuter plural, pulchra
neuter plural, pulchra, declension: Hello, The phrase “My beautiful gifts” translates into Latin as follows: -“Mea pulchra dona” or with a different word order which in Latin can be variable: -“Dona mea pulchra”. As for “MEI DECORUS CHARISMA”, I’m sorry, but it is absolutely WRONG...

Latin: correct pronunciation, latin pronunciation, correct pronunciation
latin pronunciation, correct pronunciation, latin phrases: Hello, Here’s the correct scholastic pronunciation of “Fac et spera”: F as the F in English A as the A in ‘father’ C as the C in ‘cat E as the E in ‘fence . T like in English. S as the S in sound P like in English. E as the E in ‘fence...

Latin: Is this correct?, correct translation, verba
correct translation, verba, pronoun: Hello Rhada, The correct translation for Words free all” is: “Verba omnes liberant”. Please note that: Words = VERBA free = LIBERANT (not liberante ) all = OMNES As for Words free me” or “I am freed by words”, the correct translation into...

Latin: What is the correction pronunciation..., tsea, pronunciation
tsea, pronunciation, phrase: I assume that you are using this phrase in its usual ecclesiastical context. Therefore, I will provide the ecclesiastical (Italianate) pronunciation usually used in such a context. That would be as follows. Lectio - LEK-tsea-oh Divina - di-VEEN-ah ...

Latin: crest translation, deer family, family crest
deer family, family crest, ablative: Hello, I am sorry, but the only thing I can tell you is that ALCI could be the dative singular of the Latin noun ALCES (nominative case) meaning “elk”, i.e. the name applied to several large members of the deer family. As for PRAEII, it does not exist...

Latin: Dare to Dream, public archive, personal projects
public archive, personal projects, triathlons: That thought could be represented in Latin by Aude concipere. ************************************************************ ************************************************************ Since you designed this question public, the answer will go into...

Latin: De Quo, ablative case, strathclyde regional council
ablative case, strathclyde regional council, relative pronoun: Dear John, Yes, I confirm it. In fact the Latin legal expression “de quo” belongs to Medieval Latin and means exactly the question in the sense of a point or subject under discussion or consideration , an issue . In classical Latin ‘de quo’ is ...

Latin: In Death, correct translation, public archive
correct translation, public archive, mortis: No, that makes no sense in Latin. If you want to keep as closely to that locuation as possible, you could use: In morte nostrae animae coniungantur. ************************************************************ ************************************************************...

Latin: Debate, latin declension, grammar syntax
latin declension, grammar syntax, grammatical analysis: Hello, “an open mind” as “a mind receptive to different opinions and ideas” can be translated into Latin as follows: 1-“Aperta mens ac libera” 2-“Liber ac promptus animus”. 3-“Promptum ac liberum ingenium” Note that in Latin it’s better to...

Latin: Definition: Barbarian, classical civilization, ancient latin
classical civilization, ancient latin, julius caesar: Essentially, barbarians were those outside the civilized gamut of the world, originally including the Gauls, etc., before Julius Caesar brought classical civilization to them. The word (Latin barbari, Greek barbaroi ) is said to be onomatopoetic; that...

Latin: Definition, ancient greek word, masculine noun
ancient greek word, masculine noun, ancient latin: Hi Angel, The Romans called the barbarians BARBARI, nominative plural of the masculine noun and adjective BARBARUS which derives from the ancient Greek word ‘barbaros originally denoting one who did not speak Greek or pronounced it wrongly, as if he was...

Latin: Dilemma, public archive, latin word
public archive, latin word, greek word: In the usual English meaning of the Greek word, you could use confusio. ************************************************************ ************************************************************ Since you designed this question public, the answer will...

Latin: developing a family coat of arms, family crest, latin sentence
family crest, latin sentence, latin translation: Hello, First of all, I must tell you that it s not possible to translate literally into Latin your motto which works well in English, but not in Latin. Therefore an appropriate Latin translation for If you can t wing it, it ll never fly could sound...

Latin: Endurance, public archive, endurance
public archive, endurance, latin: In its usual English significance, one could render that thought by perseverantia. ************************************************************ ************************************************************ Since you designed this question public, the...

Latin: Engish into latin, latin declension, word order
latin declension, word order, engish: Hello again Abbie, Sorry for not having answered these questions some days ago, but you asked me in category GREEK. Anyway, here s the translation of the phrase “What nourishes me, destroys me : Quod me nutrit, me destruit . As for “You will...

Latin: English to Latin, regnum meum, english to latin
regnum meum, english to latin, english phrase: Hello! The sentence Unshaken as His kingdom is my walk with God is in Latin as follows: “Firmum ut Eius regnum meum est una cum Deo iter» Please note that: Unshaken = FIRMUM As = UT His = EIUS kingdom = REGNUM is = EST my = MEUM walk =...

Latin: English to Latin, latin maria, english to latin
latin maria, english to latin, spiritual presence: Hello, glad to have helped you. So, here are the translations you need. - Rerum essentia (essence –ESSENTIA- of things-RERUM). - Noctis silentium (silence –SILENTIUM-of night-NOCTIS) - Luci (to the light-from the nominative LUX, light) ...

Latin: English to Latin, english to latin, ablative case
english to latin, ablative case, person plural: Hello, here’s the translation you need: -“Gratias ago tibi pro tua benignitate amicitiaque”, if the person addressed is a 2nd. person singular. “Gratias ago vobis pro vestra benignitate amicitiaque”, if the person addressed is a 2nd. person plural....

Latin: English to Latin, english to latin, latin word
english to latin, latin word, sensus: Hello, Here are the translations you asked me: -“Cum iam non sentit cor” or Cum sensus iam non habet cor (“When the heart no longer feels ). -“Cum desinit cor sentire“ or Cum sensus cor desinit habere (“When the heart ceases to feel”). Best...

Latin: English to Latin, english to latin, ablative
english to latin, ablative, preposition: Hello, Yes, I had! As for the phrase Forever in our hearts and always remembered , which however cannot be rendered verbatim, here’s its best translation into Latin: “Et in corde et in memoria nostra semper”. Best regards, Maria _______________________________________...

Latin: English to Latin, english to latin, english phrase
english to latin, english phrase, potestas: Hi Rowan, Both the sentences “The Power of One and Power of One are in Latin as follows: -“Unius potestas” where UNIUS is ‘of One and POTESTAS is ‘The Power (‘Power ). In this English phrase I assume that the word ‘Power means ‘Political...

Latin: English to Latin, sunflower forest, latin translation
sunflower forest, latin translation, english to latin: Hello, here s the correct Latin translation of the phrase “Creatures of the sunflower forest”: “ Helianthorum (or Helianthi ) silvae animalia” Please note that: -‘Creatures is ANIMALIA(nominative plural)as the term animalia indicates all...

Latin: English to Latin, latin translation, latin version
latin translation, latin version, english to latin: Hello, Here s the correct Latin translation of the joke you mention. “Duo mures in suo stabant cavo Felem quae extra erat observantes. “ Ego certe efficere possum ut Feles abeat”, unus eorum inquit. “ Quomodo?”, quaesivit alter stupefactus. “Audi!...

Latin: English to Latin, latin declension, evil doer
latin declension, evil doer, english to latin: Hello, “Who carries out evil, evil will come”can be rendered in Latin as follows: 1-“Malum habebit qui malum facit”. or with a different word order : 2-“Qui malum facit malum habebit”. Also more concisely : 3-« Malum aliud generat malum »(literally,...

Latin: English to Latin, english to latin, nominative case
english to latin, nominative case, female person: Hello, The phrase I, alone, from ashes” would be in Latin as follows: -“Solus, ex cineribus”, if ‘alone’(SOLUS) refers to a male person. -“Sola, ex cineribus “, if ‘alone’(SOLA) refers to a female person. Please note that EX is ‘from’; CINERIBUS(ablative...

Latin: English to Latin, genitive case, latin maria
genitive case, latin maria, poetic inspiration: Hello, I’m sorry, but I have to tell you that I can translate the words you wrote, but they would make no sense in Latin as they are out of a context and Neo-Imagism / Haikuesque did not exist in Roman times, of course! For example, “of poetic inspiration...

Latin: English to Latin, english to latin, invictus
english to latin, invictus, fuit: Hello, The Latin adjective for the English word “invincible” is: -“Invictus” in the nominative masculine. -“Invicta” in the nominative feminine. -“Invictum” in the nominative neuter. Latin is in fact an inflected language where there are different...

Latin: English to Latin for a name for a Family Trust, english to latin, nominative case
english to latin, nominative case, family trust: Hello, Here are the translations you asked me: -“Divitiarum cella” or “Divitiarum apothèca” (“Store of Wealth” or “Place where Wealth is Stored” ) - “Divitiarum custos “ or “ Divitiarum defensor” (“Protector of Wealth or Defender of Wealth “) ...

Latin: English to Latin Phrase, ipsa scientia potestas est, latin phrase
ipsa scientia potestas est, latin phrase, roger bacon: I don t know how it is exactly rendered on your ring, but generally Scientia, potestas would be a rather literal rendition. The full statement is: Ipsa scientia potestas est from Roger Bacon s Meditationes Sacrae, De Haeresibus [Sacred Meditations...

Latin: English to Latin Please!, translation from english to latin, english to latin
translation from english to latin, english to latin, nota bene: Hello, Here are three translations of the sentence What does not destroy me, makes me strong : 1-“Quod me non destruit, me fortificat” 2-«Quod me non destruit, me fortem reddit ». 3-“Quod me non delet, me fortem facit ” Best, Maria _________________________________________________...

Latin: English to Latin phrase for memorial plaque, memorial plaque, latin phrase
memorial plaque, latin phrase, english to latin: Hello Nigel, Here s the translation you need for the memorial plaque: “Ad commilitonum memoriam qui pro patria mortui sunt”. Please note that: In memory is AD MEMORIAM of our comrades is COMMILITONUM fallen is QUI PRO PATRIA MORTUI...

Latin: English to Latin phrase, latin phrase, venetian plaster
latin phrase, venetian plaster, compliance problem: Hello Catherine, So, if you want to use Latin to say Place clothing within, or Always put your clothes here , you can stencil only one word which is exactly the equivalent in Latin. This word is just “Apodyterium” (from a Greek term) a noun which...

Latin: English to Latin phrases, english to latin phrases, latin translations
english to latin phrases, latin translations, english to latin: Hello, Glad to help you. So, here are the translations you asked me. “Be true to yourself = 1-“Vere dic tibi ipsi” or 2- Verum dic tibi ipsi . I will not walk in fear = 1-“Sine metu ac timore deambulabo” or 2- “Impavidus deambulabo”...

Latin: English to Latin question., english to latin, latin word
english to latin, latin word, art light: Hello, The phrase “May the Art’s light protect us” can be rendered as follows: -“Lux artis custodiat nos” or -“Nos lux protegat artis”. As you can see, Latin word order can differ from English. Best, Maria ________________________________________________...

Latin: English to Latin rendering, latin declension, english to latin
latin declension, english to latin, latin word: Dear Traci, Glad to help you. So, I suppose that in your phrases My son” is a vocative, i.e. your newborn you are addressing to. In this case here’s the translations you asked me: -“Fili mi, fons gaudii” or “Fili mi,principium gaudii” (My son,...

Latin: English to Latin Translation, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, omnia: Hello, Here s the translation you asked me. “Honor super omnia“. Or: “In primis Honor” Best regards Maria _______________________________ Please note that: Honor = latin HONOR Above= latin SUPER (or, IN) All= Latin OMNIA (or, PRIMIS) ...

Latin: English to Latin Translation, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, correct translation: Hello Elizabeth, The correct translation of “Fallen Angel” is : ”Delapsus Angelus” or with a different word order Angelus Delapsus . Please note that: -DELAPSUS (nominative masculine, past participle of the deponent verb DELABOR) = fallen -ANGELUS...

Latin: English to Latin Translation, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, declension: Hello, Granted that the phrase “What feelings sound like” cannot be translated literally into Latin, here are the translations which better correspond to the sense of the English sentence: 1-“Animi motuum sonus”. 2-“Animi motuum vox”. 3-“Vox affectuum”....

Latin: English-to-Latin Translation, english to latin translation, masculine noun
english to latin translation, masculine noun, feminine noun: Hello, Here are the translations you need. “Malum Nullam adhibet Misericordiam” ( Evil Shows No Mercy ) “ Proxima est Mors , if ‘The End ‘ means ‘death . “ Proximus est Finis (or Exitus) ”, if ‘The End means ‘purpose , ‘aim . Best regards...

Latin: English - Latin Translation, english latin translation, nota bene
english latin translation, nota bene, iter: Hi Ashley, The phrases you wrote can be translated into Latin as follows: Road to Ruin = -“Ad Exitium Via “ or: - “ Ruinae iter” No Man s Land = -“Nullius hominis locus”(literal). Or: -“Locus in confinio situs” Best regards Maria...

Latin: English to Latin Translation, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, latin text: Hello, Here s the Latin text for I can t live with or without you : “Nec sine te nec tecum vivere possum”. It is a quotation from Ovid s Amores, XI b, line 39. Best regards, Maria ________________________________________ Note that: -I can...

Latin: English to Latin Translation, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, dolor: Hello, Glad to help you. So, here are the translations you need: -”Vivere est pati”.(“To live is to suffer ). Please note that VIVERE is ‘to live’; EST matches ‘is’; PATI is ‘to suffer’. -“Ubi amor, ibi dolor”. (“Where there is love, there...

Latin: English to Latin Translation, english to latin translation, relative pronoun
english to latin translation, relative pronoun, family lore: Hello, “Id tantum fac!” is correct and can match Just Do it”, while in “Quod tantum fac” “quod” is wrong as it is a relative pronoun which has nothing to do with “ Just Do it”. With regard to “Agedum...…modo”, I must point out that it is an idiomatic...

Latin: English to Latin Translation., english to latin translation, ancient roman religion
english to latin translation, ancient roman religion, tutelary deity: Hello, here s the translation you asked me: “Ingenium aeterna est tolerantia”. Please note that INGENIUM (nominative neuter) is ‘genius’ as ‘talent’, ‘extraordinary intellectual and creative power ; AETERNA (nominative feminine agreed with TOLERANTIA)...

Latin: English-Latin Translation, english latin translation, university of alaska anchorage
english latin translation, university of alaska anchorage, water currents: Hello, here are the translations you can use as mottos for the debate award you called The Salmon Award”. -“Ideas pàrere “ or “Cogitationes gignere”, both meaning Spawning Ideas . Please note that Latin IDEAS is not a mistake (See footnote to...

Latin: English to Latin Translation, percy bysshe shelley, english to latin translation
percy bysshe shelley, english to latin translation, british poet: Hello, No problem! So, I’ve translated these lines from ‘To a Skylark’ by Percy Bysshe Shelley into Latin. Here they are: “Rursum prorsum aspicimus et de iis laboramus rebus quae non sunt. Risus noster effusus curis est plenus. Carmina nostra...

Latin: English To Latin Translation please., english to latin translation, semper simul
english to latin translation, semper simul, latin phrase: Hello, Here are the translations you asked me: 1-“Semper simul” or “Una semper ” [Forever Together] 2-“Unitas“ [Unity] Note that: -SEMPER = forever -SIMUL / UNA = together This Latin phrase means exactly ‘being together forever no matter...

Latin: English to Latin Translation, english to latin translation, latin grammar
english to latin translation, latin grammar, grammar structure: Hello, First of all here s the correct translation of Integrity and Virtue are the weapons of good men : “Integritas ac virtus bonorum sunt hominum arma”. Or: «Integritas ac virtus bonorum hominum arma » where the verb ‘sunt (are) is understood,...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, league of gentlemen
english to latin translation, league of gentlemen, english to latin: You could turn it something like: Honestorum Foedus Virorum. It all depends what you mean by gentlemen. If it simply amounts to Men s Club, then you can leave off the honestorum and just make it Foedus Virorum. If you want to stress the quality...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, silence of the night
english to latin translation, silence of the night, english to latin: Hello, “Silence of the night” is in Latin “ Noctis silentium” or Silentium noctis . In fact ‘Silence is SILENTIUM (Nominative case) , while ‘of the night is NOCTIS (genitive case). As you can see, Latin word order can differ from the English one...

Latin: English to Latin translation of "You are here", english to latin translation, latin declension
english to latin translation, latin declension, demonstrative pronoun: Hi Evan, The correct translation of You are here is: -“ Hic es”, if the pronoun ‘you’ refers to a 2nd.person singular. -“Hic estis”, if the pronoun ‘you’ refers to a 2nd.person plural. In Latin in fact there are two different forms to indicate...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, latin motto
english to latin translation, latin motto, stag party: Hello, Actually your request is quite strange, but I’ve decided to play along with you and then joke about this matter. So, here are the translations you asked me: - Calvus homo uxorem tandem ducturus est .( The bald man is finally getting married...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, proper nouns
english to latin translation, proper nouns, bro sis: Hi, Guard her from its eyes” is clear now and then I can give you an appropriate translation which is: “Eam ab eius infestis defende oculis“. Please note that: -Guard = DEFENDE -her = EAM -from = AB -its = EIUS . This pronoun in the...

Latin: English-Latin translation, english latin translation, plural noun
english latin translation, plural noun, feast day: Hello, “Have a great holiday” can be translated as follows: 1-“Pulchras habe ferias”, if ‘holiday’ means “ vacation”, i.e. “A period of time devoted to pleasure, rest, or relaxation”,”Some days free from work that one may spend at leisure”. 2-“ Laetum...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, facit: Hello, If you are the same Alan Owen who asked me exactly this question yesterday, I have to point out that I’ve already answered it just yesterday, indeed! Anyway I send you again this answer you have read today, 7/25/06 08:25 AM. If on the contrary...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, step in the right direction: Hello, The phrase “Fight for what you know to be true” cannot be translated word for word, but the equivalent in Latin is the following sentence: “Pro veritate pugna”. Please note that: -Fight= PUGNA -For = PRO -what you know to be true=...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, vocative case
english to latin translation, vocative case, english to latin: Hello, Here’s the translation you asked me: -“Deus, da mihi quaeso virtutem ” (God, grant me courage) -“Deus, da mihi quaeso fortitudinem ”(God, grant me fortitude) -“Deus, da mihi quaeso audaciam” (God, grant me guts) Best, Maria _________________________________________...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, wanted lunch
english to latin translation, wanted lunch, family motto: Hello, I could eat would be in Latin: “ Edere certe possum Note that EDERE is ‘eat’;POSSUM is ‘I could’, while CERTE is an intensifying adverb which in Latin is appropriate in this case. Anyway, you could say also: -“Fame laboro” ( I’m...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, negative connotation
english to latin translation, negative connotation, power violence: Hello, Here are three translations of the phrase love and strength , according to the different meaning of the word ‘strength’ in Latin: 1-“Amor et fortitudo”, if “strength” means: ‘inner strength’, ‘strength of mind’, ‘fortitude’, ‘moral robustness’....

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, versio vulgata
english to latin translation, versio vulgata, latin bible: Hello Michael, here s the translation you asked me: “Iesus autem dicebat : Pater dimitte illis, non enim sciunt quid faciunt.” (See **Vulgate, i.e. Latin Bible, Luke 23:34) All the best Maria __________________________________________ Please...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, web translators
english to latin translation, web translators, english to latin: Hello, A literal translation of “with arms wide open could be “passis brachiis” which is an ablative of manner as it indicates the way in which an action is performed (see below). Anyway, if “with arms wide open is in a sentence like “to receive...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, purpose clause
english to latin translation, purpose clause, english to latin: Hello, Does the phrase “To love and protect my family” mean “In order to love and protect my family” as a purpose clause? If so, here’s the translation: “Ad meam amandam ac protegendam familiam”. If on the contrary “To love and protect” are...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, english phrases
english to latin translation, english phrases, english to latin: Hello, Here are the translations you asked me: “Love forever “ : -“SEMPITERNUS AMOR” or”AMOR AETERNUS”,if ‘love is a noun. -“IN PERPETUUM AMA”, if ‘love is an imperative. “Salvation lets their wings un-fold “: ”SALUS SUAS EXPANDERE ALAS CONCEDIT...

Latin: English to Latin translation., royal navy submarine service, english to latin translation
royal navy submarine service, english to latin translation, english to latin: Hello, The sentence “Submariners go deeper and for longer” could be translated into Latin as follows: “Qui in submersa nave merent altius descendunt ac diutius . Please note that: Submariners = QUI IN SUBMERSA NAVE MERENT [literally, ”those who(QUI)...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, course hope: Hello, Here are the translations you need. My heart will always belong to you. “Cor meum semper erit tuum ” I ll never stop loving you. “Numquam te amare desistam” Your ever loving soul mate ”Tuus perdite sodalis amans” Do not...

Latin: English to Latin translation.., english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, literal translation: Hello Laura, Your sentence I love you very much, and always will forever is in Latin: -“TE VALDE AMO AC SEMPER AMABO” (literal translation) or: -“ NUNC ET SEMPER TE VALDE AMABO » (meaning literally : I will love you very much now and forever) ...

Latin: English to Latin translation., english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, axis: Hi, Order of the dark axis” is in Latin: “Tenebrosi axis ordo”. Please note that: -Order = ORDO (as an ‘association , ‘a society constituted as a fraternity, such as the Knights Templars in the Middle Ages ) -of the axis = AXIS (genitive case)...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, gloria deo
english to latin translation, gloria deo, latin translations: Hello, Here are the translations you asked me. Glory be to God = “Gloria Deo” Glory to God only = “Deo solum Gloria” Praise and honor are all His = “Omnis Laus et honor sunt Eius ” All the best Maria ______________________- NOTA BENE...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, gillis: Hello, The phrase We swim, we procreate, we die can be translated into English as follows: “Natamus, procreamus, morimur”. Best regards Maria _________________________________________________ NATAMUS= we swim PROCREAMUS= we procreate MORIMUR=...

Latin: English-Latin translation for a motto, english latin translation, word order
english latin translation, word order, boat building: Hello, “Build what you sail” cannot be translated literally into Latin as the phrase would make no sense. Therefore we must use a sentence that reads “Build your boat” whose translation is: “Tuum aedifica phaselum”. In fact TUUM (accusative masculine...

Latin: English to Latin translation of phrase, english to latin translation, latin phrase
english to latin translation, latin phrase, total annihilation: Hello, “total annihilation” as an utter, absolute destruction is in Latin: “Summa exstinctio” or “ Suprema exstinctio”. In fact SUMMA /SUPREMA (adjective in the feminine agreed with EXSTINCTIO) means “total”, while EXSTINCTIO (nominative feminine,...

Latin: English to Latin translation of vows, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, anniversary present: Hello Rebecca, Here s the translation you asked me: “...statim ut manum tibi dedi, ipsam tibi dedi vitam.” [ ..just as I have given you my hand to hold, so I give you my life to keep. + “Quidquid venturum est, semper tecum ero.” [ What may come,...

Latin: English to Latin translation, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, catagory: Hello Shane, Here are the translations you need: Serenity is SERENITAS Salvation is SALUS Boat of Freedom is LIBERTATIS (of freedom) SCAPHA (boat) Freedom is LIBERTAS Maybe you could use also: GAUDIUM (happiness, joy) FELICITAS ( blissfulness,...

Latin: English/ Latin verb, deponent verbs, latin verb
deponent verbs, latin verb, english verb: Hi Mary, I think you are referring to the English verb TO IMPRECATE, [i.e. to invoke evil on, to curse, to cuss out], which derives from the Latin deponent verb IMPRECARI that in turn goes back to another deponent verb, PRECARI + the prefix IN- which becomes...

Latin: English to Latin, biotic factors, latin expression
biotic factors, latin expression, latin translation: Hi Manoj, Your question is interesting, but there are some problems. First, it is difficult to adapt a Latin word to a concept that did not exist in Roman times, of course; second, if you want an adjective, you must know that in Latin the adjectives...

Latin: English to latin, worship cult, word faith
worship cult, word faith, english to latin: Hello, First of all I have to point out that in classical Latin there are different terms for the English word “Faith”, according to the meaning we are giving to. Therefore “Faith” can be rendered in Latin as follows: 1- “FIDES (nominative feminine,...

Latin: English to latin confusion, english to latin, infinitive
english to latin, infinitive, 3rd person: Hello, No confusion, they all are correct, of course. In fact they differ from one another only because they use different verbs (occidit, interficit, necat, confirmat, facit) which however have the same meaning (see below). Best, Maria _____________________________________________________...

Latin: English to latin - free your mind?, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, person plural: Hello, “FREE YOUR MIND” is in Latin: “Tuam libera mentem” Have a nice day. Maria _______________________________ TUAM=your LIBERA=free MENTEM=mind Please note that you must say: Vestram liberate mentem , if you refer to a 2nd.person plural....

Latin: English to latin phrase translation, latin phrase translation, english to latin phrase translation
latin phrase translation, english to latin phrase translation, online translater: Yes, translations require a good knowledge of the language, which a dictionary alone cannot provide, and those online programs are virtually worthless. Solum in somniis would do it. You might like the alliteration of the letter s. If not, you can...

Latin: English to latin translation, english to latin translation, dear diana
english to latin translation, dear diana, english to latin: Dear Diana, First of all thanks for your kind words. So actually is not so easy to translate this quotation from Tennessee Williams. Anyway, I think that A prayer for the wild at heart kept in cages could be rendered as follows: “Preces...

Latin: English to latin translation, english to latin translation, meaningful phrase
english to latin translation, meaningful phrase, english phrase: Hello Kyle, The phrase : “Finish what you start and never give up is in Latin: “QUOD INCEPISTI PERFICE AC NUMQUAM CEDE” Please note that: Finish: PERFICE What:QUOD You start:INCEPISTI And: AC Never:NUMQUAM Give up:CEDE Best wishes Maria...

Latin: English to latin, latin author, english to latin
latin author, english to latin, latin word: Hello, If you want a literal translation of “Live for today as tomorrow is never promised”, here it is: “Vive hodie, quia crastinus numquam promittitur dies”. Note that: -Live = VIVE -for today = HODIE -as = QUIA -tomorrow = CRASTINUS DIES -is...

Latin: English to ltain, military accoutrements, vinco
military accoutrements, vinco, dei gratia: Hello Dave, Here s the translation you asked me: ARMORUM VI, DEI GRATIA VINCAM Or: ARMORUM VI, DEI GRATIA VINCO Nota bene: ARMORUM: of arms (military accoutrements etc) VI : by force DEI : God s GRATIA: in grace VINCAM (VINCO) : I...

Latin: English Phrase to Latin, latin vulgate bible, english latin translation
latin vulgate bible, english latin translation, jerome vulgate: It could be rendered as follows: Ille solus est beatus, qui intra securus dicere possit: Fac pessima cras, hodie enim vixi. As to the difference between classical and mediaeval Latin, some writers of mediaeval Latin (e.g., Thomas Aquinas) are very...

Latin: English phrase to Latin, west virginia mountain, montani semper liberi
west virginia mountain, montani semper liberi, phrase mountain: Hello, The state motto of West Virginia : Mountain men are always free is in Latin: Montani Semper Liberi . Best regards Maria ________________________________________________ Nota Bene. Mountain men = MONTANI are = SUNT, but this verb may...

Latin: English phrase into latin, naturalis historia, english phrase
naturalis historia, english phrase, imminent collapse: Hello, Here is the translation of the English phrase Rats leave a sinking ship or Rats desert a sinking ship”: “Mures mersam derelinquunt navem”. The earliest version of this proverb goes back to Pliny the Elder who wrote in his “Naturalis Historia”...

Latin: English phrase to latin, english phrase, translations
english phrase, translations, latin: Hello Kevin, Here are the translations you need. 1- That which does not kill us = « Quod nos non occidit » 2- That which does not kill us makes us stronger = « Quod nos non occidit nos fortiores facit”. Best regards Maria _______________________________________________________...

Latin: English Translation, e pluribus unum, annuit
e pluribus unum, annuit, mottos: The first three expressions are all found on the Great Seal of the United States, so they were all designed as a unit, at the end of the 18th century. The motto, if recollection serves, was finally adopted only in the 1930s. Its Latin form is In Deo speramus....

Latin: what is the English translation..., ablative, virtue
ablative, virtue, sphere: Hello, Here s the translation you asked me: “We are strong because our virtue and talent”. or: “We are worth because our virtue and talent “. Best, Maria __________________________________________ VIRTUTE (ablative of Sphere )= because our virtue...

Latin: Enlgish to Latin, english expression, ambiguous language
english expression, ambiguous language, ambiguity: Probably that is because you have to go behind the ambiguity of the English expression. Such a soul is not lost, as if you lose a coin; it is damned. Therefore: Anima damnata. Latin is excellent for forcing one to think of the real meaning of what...

Latin: Epigrafe Latina, antoninus pius roman emperor, reign of antoninus pius
antoninus pius roman emperor, reign of antoninus pius, tribunicia potestas: Hello Viola First of all, here are the separate words of this Latin inscription that I suppose to be on a Roman monument: IMPERATORE CAESARE DIVI HADRIANI FILIO DIVI TRAIANI NEPOTE DIVI NERVAE PRONEPOTE T. AELIO HADRIANO ANTONINO AVGVSTO...

Latin: ERANOS, ascona switzerland, greek term
ascona switzerland, greek term, meaning of the word: Hello Violante, the word ‘eranos is not a Latin noun, but a Greek term which means literally “a banquet to which each guest is expected to bring some food”. Today the term Eranos is used by some cultural institutions to indicate an association to...

Latin: Erratum, and the latin word for error?, errata corrige, nominative plural
errata corrige, nominative plural, slip of the tongue: Hello, The Latin term “Erratum” is a neuter noun in the nominative singular and means “mistake”, error , exactly as ‘a single error’ in printing or writing. On the contrary “Errata” (mistakes, errors) is the same noun ‘erratum’, but in the nominative...

Latin: Et hoc transibit, accurate thanks, quoque
accurate thanks, quoque, adverbs: Hello, this too shall pass can be translated as: 1-“Et hoc transibit”. 2-“Hoc etiam transibit“. 3- Hoc quoque transibit”. All these translations are correct. Therefore it s not possible to indicate the most accurate as they all are accurate....

Latin: if you were e.g. a junior..., colloquial expression, extant literature
colloquial expression, extant literature, perfect tense: In such a case, Latin would more likely use the perfect tense: Sic imperatum est ( impero would be better than iubeo ). There are no contemporary citations. Aside from fragments, we do not have any significant written literature until about the...

Latin: eia and o, vocative case, immortal gods
vocative case, immortal gods, dictionary definition: O is typically used with the vocative (case of direct address), with a person being addressed: O di immortales! ( Immortal gods! ). This is the same usage as in English with O (as opposed to oh ), as in O Lord, hear us! Eia is used as more general...

Latin: the emperor wears no clothes, emperor has no clothes, emperor wears no clothes
emperor has no clothes, emperor wears no clothes, vestimenta: Hello, Both these phrases can be translated into Latin as follows: 1-“Rex vestimenta non habet”. 2- Vestes imperator non induit . Best regards Maria ________________________________________________ NOTA BENE The emperor = REX (IMPERATOR) ...

Latin: eng to latin, genitive, infinitive
genitive, infinitive, contempt: Hello, The sentence “I cannot be held in contempt of an invalid order can be translated into Latin as follows: “Invalidi praescripti detrectationis accusari nequeo “. Please note that: -INVALIDI (adjective in the genitive agreed with ‘praescripti...

Latin: An english to Latin translation, english to latin translation, latin translator
english to latin translation, latin translator, translator on line: Hello, Here’s the translation you need. “Vivendi ratio, moriendi ratio, amandi ratio, pugnandi ratio”. (The reason to live, the reason to die, the reason to love, the reason to fight). In fact: The reason = RATIO (nominative) to live=VIVENDI...

Latin: english to latin, english to latin, latin word
english to latin, latin word, dear barbara: Dear Barbara, Though it seems quite odd, the sentence I drive way too fast to worry about cholesterol! can be translated into Latin as follows: “Iter facio velocius quam ut cholesterolum curem!” Please note that: I drive = FACIO Way = ITER too...

Latin: english to latin, angel angelus, angel from heaven
angel angelus, angel from heaven, english to latin: Hi, Here are the translations you asked me. “An angel from heaven “ = “Caelestis Angelus “ or “Angelus caelestis”. ”I m forever by your side” = “ Tecum semper”. All the best. Maria _________________________________________________ NOTA BENE ...

Latin: english to latin, english to latin, heart condition
english to latin, heart condition, thanks in advance: Hello, The phrase “From here on for always” can be translated into Latin as follows: “Iam nunc et semper” Please note that IAM NUNC means from here on’, while ET SEMPER means ‘for always’. As for the translations you mention, i.e.”ab hic in pro...

Latin: english to latin, english to latin, tui
english to latin, tui, wedding day: Hello, If you want this song’s title to be translated literally into Latin, it would be as follows: “Miraculum tui” or “Prodigium tui”. Note that MIRACULUM / PRODIGIUM is ‘the wonder’ and TUI is ‘of you’. Otherwise you could say : ”Mirabilis...

Latin: english to latin, english to latin, literal translation
english to latin, literal translation, beautiful life: Hello, Here’s a literal translation of your phrase: “Aliquid bonum cupio quod pulchram facere possit vitam sicut mortem”. Best regards, Maria ______________________________________ Please note that: -I want = CUPIO -something = ALIQUID -good...

Latin: english to latin, verb conjugation, english to latin
verb conjugation, english to latin, inner strength: Please, see my follow up below. __________________________________________ Hello, Here is the translation you asked me: 1-“In me fortitudo inest” ( “There is strength in me ) 2-“In Deo fortitudo inest” ( There is strength in God” ) Please...

Latin: english to latin, english to latin, accusative
english to latin, accusative, infinitive: Hello, First of all “Carpe noctem” is correct, as it is an adaptation of the quotation from Horace’s Odes, Book 1, ode 11, line 8, which reads :“Carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero [literally, Seize the day, trust as little as possible in tomorrow...

Latin: english to latin, relative pronoun, english to latin
relative pronoun, english to latin, latin word: Hello, In Latin you can say as follows: 1- “Id pertaesus sum !” [ I m over it (in the sense of being tired of a situation being done with it.)] 2-“Donec amissum quod habes nescis” ( You don t know what [you re missing]/[you ve got] until it s...

Latin: english-latin phrase translation, latin phrase translation, english to latin
latin phrase translation, english to latin, english latin: Hello, Here‘s the literal translation of your phrases. -“Strength to do what s needed” “NECESSARIA FACIENDI VIS” -“Courage to do what s right” “AEQUA FACIENDI AUDACIA” There is however another translation which is better in Latin as it is more...

Latin: english to latin phrase, vinegar joe, dog latin
vinegar joe, dog latin, latin phrase: Hello Mary, I think that the motto you refer to is : Illegitimis non carborundum usually translated as: “Don t let the bastards grind you down”. I must however point out that this sentence is not real Latin, but a a pseudo-Latin joke probably...

Latin: english to latin plz, english to latin, fortitudo
english to latin, fortitudo, accusative case: Hello, here’s the literal translation of Strength through loyalty : “Per fidem fortitudo”. Anyway you could say also: “Una cum fide fortitudo” to point out that Strength must proceed at the same pace as ‘ loyalty , i.e. there is no true “strength”...

Latin: A english to latin question, english to latin, purpose clause
english to latin, purpose clause, gerundive: Hello, If the verb ‘to overcome’ in the phrase “To Overcome the Fear is simply an infinitive, you must say: ”Timorem vincere”. If on the contrary “to overcome” is a purpose clause used to show the intention of the action of the verb in this sentence,...

Latin: english to latin translation, ralph waldo emerson, english to latin translation
ralph waldo emerson, english to latin translation, english to latin: Hello Therese, The Ralph Waldo Emerson s quotation Give all to love can be translated into Latin as follows: -“Amori omnino indulge” or: -”Amorem omnino sequere”. Please note that: Give: INDULGE (or, SEQUERE) All:OMNINO (adverb in Latin)...

Latin: english to latin translation, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, passive form: Hello, Here’s the translation you are looking for: - Memento te amari or with a different word order: - Te amari memento Best regards, Maria ____________________________________________________ -Remember= MEMENTO (imperative, 2nd.person...

Latin: english to latin translation, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, tattoo: Hello Kat, The song title “There is a light that never goes out “ can be translated into Latin as follows: “Lux est quae numquam exstinguitur » Please note that : there is = EST a light = LUX that = QUAE never = NUMQUAM goes out = EXSTINGUITUR...

Latin: english to latin translation, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, female person: Hello, Here are the translations you asked me. 1- Till death do us part = -“Donec mors nos separaverit” where DONEC is ‘till ; MORS is ‘death ; NOS is ‘us ; SEPARAVERIT is ‘do part . 2- To you, I belong = -“Tuus sum” if the one who belongs...

Latin: english to latin translation, english to latin translation, hell thanks
english to latin translation, hell thanks, english to latin: Hello, Here s the translation of the phrase you mention, i.e.: Prisoner of self, Save yourself from Hell . Tui ipsius captive, Te ipsum ab (or ex ) Inferis serva . Best regards Maria ____________________________________________ Please note...

Latin: english to latin translation, english to latin translation, desiderius erasmus of rotterdam
english to latin translation, desiderius erasmus of rotterdam, erasmus of rotterdam: Hello Kaitlin, The phrase you mention can be translated into Latin as follows: 1-“Sic somnia tamquam semper victurus, sic vive tamquam cras moriturus”. 2-“Somnia ut si tibi semper vivendum sit, vive ut si cras tibi moriendum sit”. Best, Maria...

Latin: english to latin translation, english to latin translation, latin phrase
english to latin translation, latin phrase, vinegar joe: Hello, In classical Latin this phrase can be translated as follows: 1-“Noli sinere te ab improbis opprimi “. 2-“Noli arrogantium iniurias pati “. 3-“Te malos insolentesque vexare noli sinere . There is however a well-known dog Latin phrase(i.e....

Latin: english-latin translation, english latin translation, translation 1
english latin translation, translation 1, latin word: Hello, Here are the translations you asked me: 2- “Vitam ama ” (love life) 3- “Quod me non necat me fortiorem faciet” or: “Quod me non necat me confirmabit” (that which does not kill me shall only make me stronger) 4- “Fortitudinem nostram...

Latin: english to latin translation, english to latin translation, military treatise
english to latin translation, military treatise, seeking peace: Hello, The translation of “When seeking peace, prepare for war” is the following: “Si petis pacem, para bellum”. In fact: -When seeking = SI PETIS -Peace= PACEM -Prepare for = PARA -war= BELLUM There is however a Latin quotation from Vegetius,...

Latin: english to latin translation, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, correct translation: Hello Tyler, Glad to help you. So,here’s the correct translation of “Only God can judge me”: “Deus tantum me iudicare potest” or “Deus solum me iudicare potest” Best, Maria __________________________________ -Only = TANTUM / SOLUM (adverb)...

Latin: english to latin translation, english to latin translation, english to latin
english to latin translation, english to latin, free translation: Hello Joshua, Here are the translations you asked me: 1.“They that sow in tears shall reap in joy “ [Psalm 125(126):5-6] -“QUI SEMINANT(or,‘serunt )IN LACRIMIS,IN EXULTATIONE(or, ‘gaudio ) METENT . 2.” I will turn my imperfections into weapons...

Latin: english to latin, english to latin, vita
english to latin, vita, translation: Hello, here s the translation you asked me: MORS CERTA, VITA INCERTA Please note that: Death=MORS Is=EST (the verb is not necessary in this case and then is left out). Certain=CERTA Life=VITA Is not=INCERTA (i.e. uncertain, in English) ...

Latin: Another english phrase into latin, latin phrase, english phrase
latin phrase, english phrase, literature reference: Hello, The phrase “Ask, and you shall receive” is in Latin as follows: “Petite et accipietis », as we read in John 16:24, where Saint John relates these words of Jesus s speech. Please note that in this Latin phrase both “Petite” (ask) and “accipietis...

Latin: english phrase into latin., eleanor roosevelt, english phrase
eleanor roosevelt, english phrase, wall plaque: Hello, “No one can make you feel inferior without your consent” could be translated into Latin as follows: 1-“Te invito, nemo efficere potest ut tibi inferior videaris” or: 2-“Te nolente, efficere nemo potest ut tibi inferior videaris”. As you...

Latin: english phrase to latin, english infinitives, verbal noun
english infinitives, verbal noun, english phrase: Hello, That day has come can be translated as follows: -“Dies illa venit” Also, with a different word order which in Latin can be variable: -“Dies venit illa” -“Illa venit dies” Please note that: -That= ILLA (feminine of the adjective ILLE,...

Latin: english phrase to latin phrase, present subjunctive, negative particle
present subjunctive, negative particle, singular plural: Hello, Here s the literal translation of the phrase “Never give up until the end : Numquam cede, usque ad finem , if you refer to a 2nd.person singular. Numquam cedite, usque ad finem , if you refer to a 2nd.person plural) [See footnotes] In...

Latin: english phrase to latin., latin maria, english phrase
latin maria, english phrase, dominus: Hello, Glad to help you. So, “The Lord Remembers is in Latin “ Dominus recordatur” or “Dominus meminit”, while God remembers” is “Deus recordatur (meminit)”. In fact: -The Lord (or ‘God ) = DOMINUS ( or DEUS) -Remembers= RECORDATUR ( or MEMINIT)...

Latin: english phrase translation, phrase translation, english phrase
phrase translation, english phrase, mind body and soul: Hello, Here s the translation of each word you wrote as they do not form a phrase, but only a list of terms. Mind = MENS (nominative feminine, 3rd.declension) Body =CORPUS (nominative neuter. 3rd declension) Soul= ANIMA ((nominative feminine,...

Latin: english phrase, design apprentice, german expression
design apprentice, german expression, english phrase: Hello, The German expression “Design lehrling”, that is “design-apprentice or apprentice of design in English, could be translated into classical Latin as follows: 1-“In graphica descriptione tiro” or: 2-“In graphice tiro” Please note that:...

Latin: english translation, quod me nutrit me destruit, translation
quod me nutrit me destruit, translation: Hello, Here’s the translation you asked me: “What feeds me destroys me ” or “What feeds me destroys me too”. Best, Maria ______________________________________________ QUOD= what ME= me NUTRIT= feeds/ nourishes DESTRUIT= destroys / destroys...

Latin: english translation, neuter plural, latin motto
neuter plural, latin motto, freedom means: Hello, The word ‘iura’ is the neuter plural of the noun ‘ius’ (nominative)- ‘iuris’ (genitive) which can mean :”right [see for instance the expression “right and might”], jurisprudence, justice, law, the whole body of law, also a right, that is, a power,...

Latin: enlgish to latin translation1, da mihi domine, classical latin
da mihi domine, classical latin, translation1: Hi Matt, The literal translation for “Lord grant me your protection” is in Latin: “Da mihi, Domine, praesidium tuum”. Anyway, the best translation into classical Latin is: “Custodi me, Domine “. Best regards Maria _________________________________...

Latin: enlish to latin translation, english phrase, latin translation
english phrase, latin translation, lux light: Hello, “Out of Darkness cometh light is in Latin: “EX TENEBRIS LUX”. Please note that: EX : out of TENEBRIS: darkness LUX: light As you can see, I ve omitted the verb ‘cometh (“venit”, in Latin ), because it is not indispensable in this...

Latin: Could you explain this please?, passive form, participle
passive form, participle, finis: Hi Stephen, Here s the analysis of the clause “Compluribus eis proeliis pulsis, ab Ocelo....” : 1-“Eis (or ‘his ) pulsis” is an ablative absolute where EIS (HIS), ablative plural from the pronoun IS, is the subject of the ablative absolute, while PULSIS,...

Latin: Family Motto, plural adjectives, distributive adjective
plural adjectives, distributive adjective, family motto: Hello, The motto One Crisis at a Time could be translated as follows: “Singulae difficultates”. In Latin in fact we must use the distributive adjective answering the Latin question “quoteni?” which means exactly “ how many at a time ?”, “ how many...

Latin: Fate, nominative case, public archive
nominative case, public archive, essence of life: Fato should be Fatum, as subject in the nominative case. Essentia is a Late Latin word, but these are frequently used in such mottos. ************************************************************ ************************************************************...

Latin: Fate, latin tutor, public archive
latin tutor, public archive, fate: You have Latin and English mixed in your sentence. You could render that thought: Fortuna est in manibus nullis praeter tuas. ************************************************************ ************************************************************...

Latin: Fatima Prayer, fatima prayer, demonstrative pronoun
fatima prayer, demonstrative pronoun, relative pronoun: Hello, This Latin text is correct. As for ‘infernis’ instead of ‘inferiori’, you can have heard ‘inferni’, not ‘infernis’. INFERNI is in fact the genitive singular of the neuter noun INFERNUM which means ‘the lower world”, the underworld , and then...

Latin: The Ferret, genus mustela, musky odour
genus mustela, musky odour, beech marten: Hello Simon, All is fine, thank you. I was in Shanghai to visit my daughter who was there for her fieldwork, before her return to London in a week. Well, as for mustela putorius furo (i.e. the scientific name for the ferret, Genus Mustela; Subgenus...

Latin: "Figat...", daphne and apollo, epithet of apollo
daphne and apollo, epithet of apollo, son of venus: Hello Alexa, the quotation you mention is from Ovid s Metamorphoses, Book 1,lines 463-64, and refers to the myth of Daphne and Apollo, as you say. It means:” “Your bow can pierce everything (literally, “let us grant your bow can pierce everything”),...

Latin: Football Team Motto, team motto, english to latin
team motto, english to latin, imperative mood: Hi Paul, A translation of Achieve Greatness would sound better in Latin. So, here it is: -“Magnitudinem pete”, if the imperative “Achieve” refers to a 2nd.person singular. -“Magnitudinem petite”, if the imperative “Achieve” refers to a 2nd.person...

Latin: Fors Clavigera and Praeterits, neuter plural, john ruskin
neuter plural, john ruskin, feminine noun: Hello, Actually I also doubt that many British workers knew what ‘Fors clavigera meant. So, Fors clavigera means literally: Fortune (or Fate, Chance) bearing a club (a key) . In fact: -FORS is a feminine noun meaning ‘Fortune (Fate, Chance)....

Latin: "Free Yourself", correct translation, person plural
correct translation, person plural, ablative: Hello, Here’s the correct translation of the phrase Free yourself from yourself : -“Te ipsum a te ipso libera” (as a command to one person). -“Vos ipsos a vobis ipsis liberate” (as a command to many persons). Note that: -Free = LIBERA (2nd.person...

Latin: Freedom is where eagles fly, eagles fly, verb sum
eagles fly, verb sum, english to latin: Hello, here s an appropriate translation of Freedom is where eagles fly : “Ubi aquilae volant, ibi est libertas”. Best regards, Maria ________________________________________________________ Note that: -Freedom = LIBERTAS (nominative case)...

Latin: French to English to Latin translation please, english to latin translation, latin declension
english to latin translation, latin declension, french phrase: Hello Lillian, Here s the translation of the French phrase « Je pense que ce vin a déjà été bu » [ I think that this wine has already been drunk or I think this wine has been drunk before. ] : « Hoc vinum iam potum esse censeo “. or: « Hoc vinum...

Latin: Carpe Diem vs Carpe ?, critical moment, classical latin
Latin: Carpe Diem vs Carpe ?, critical moment, classical latin, articulations

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Latin-2145/f/christ-give-strength.htm


Latin: English - Latin Translation, latin via ovid, latin via ovid
Latin: English - Latin Translation, latin via ovid, italy greece, latin via ovid, italy greece

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Latin-2145/f/English-Latin-Translation-5.htm


http://en.allexperts.com/q/Latin-2145/f/English-Latin-translation-13.htm


Latin: English-Latin translation
Latin: English-Latin translation

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Latin-2145/f/English-Latin-translation-21.htm


Latin: English to Latin translation, proper translation, beautiful dream
Latin: English to Latin translation, proper translation, beautiful dream, phrase

Latin: english to latin translation, expert advice, mistake
Latin: english to latin translation, expert advice, mistake, book of common prayer

Latin: english phrase to latin phrase, latin one, english idiom
Latin: english phrase to latin phrase, latin one, english idiom, imperatives

Latin: That which does not kill will only serve to make you stronger, latin to english, intertran
Latin: That which does not kill will only serve to make you stronger, latin to english, intertran, translation

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Latin-2145/f/LATIN-PHRASE-TRANSLATION-1.htm


Latin: Latin translation, blood brother, fratres
Latin: Latin translation, blood brother, fratres, frater

Latin: Latin Wording on a Rare Item
Latin: Latin Wording on a Rare Item

Latin: latin to english, colin mackenzie, blue hackle
Latin: latin to english, colin mackenzie, blue hackle, brath

Latin: latin for night, concise explanation, many thanks
Latin: latin for night, concise explanation, many thanks

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Latin-2145/f/latin-translation-13.htm


Latin: latin translation, false face
Latin: latin translation, false face

Latin: latin translations, diligo, valde
Latin: latin translations, diligo, valde, ego

Latin: Medieval Latin, lake peipus, pedes meos
Latin: Medieval Latin, lake peipus, pedes meos, poetic expression

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Latin-2145/f/Nullius-verba.htm


Latin: "Omnia mutantur..", antecedent, depending upon context
Latin: "Omnia mutantur..", antecedent, depending upon context, relative pronoun

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Latin-2145/f/Phrase-Translations.htm


http://en.allexperts.com/q/Latin-2145/f/please-translate.htm


http://en.allexperts.com/q/Latin-2145/f/Roman-History.htm


Latin: Source Question, angelina jolie, marlowe
Latin: Source Question, angelina jolie, marlowe, stomach

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Latin-2145/f/sentence-translation.htm


Latin: spinoza grammar, declensions, mistake
Latin: spinoza grammar, declensions, mistake, infinitive

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Latin-2145/f/stress.htm


Latin: A TRANSLATION REQUEST, latin translations, intras
Latin: A TRANSLATION REQUEST, latin translations, intras, desine

Latin: Translate phrase to Latin, please., paper knife, silver paper
Latin: Translate phrase to Latin, please., paper knife, silver paper, graduation

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Latin-2145/f/Translation-Help.htm


Latin: Translation please, latin translation, perit
Latin: Translation please, latin translation, perit, typo

Latin: would like this translated, location world, plaga
Latin: would like this translated, location world, plaga, mundus

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Latin-2145/f/translation-plz.htm


Latin: translation request, latin verb, infinitive
Latin: translation request, latin verb, infinitive, classical latin

Latin: The fact that, imperfect subjunctive, sequence of tenses
imperfect subjunctive, sequence of tenses, indicative mood: Hello, The declarative expression “the fact that” translates as “Quod + the indicative”, i.e. the conjunction QUOD meaning the fact that and the INDICATIVE MOOD in the tenses which correspond to the English text, in this case. Therefore here are the...

Latin: family crest, pro deo, family motto
pro deo, family motto, family crest: Hello, “Pro Deo, familia, veritate et honore” is the translation of “For God, family, truth and honor“ as a family motto which sounds good, since it emphasizes the idea of God, family s love, devotion to truth and honour. Best regards, Maria _________________________________________...

Latin: family motto, family motto, tibi
family motto, tibi, previous question: Hello, glad to help you again. So, the variation Live each day as your last Because one day it will be is in Latin as follows: ”Quotidie vive ut si ultimus hic esset tibi dies Quia id aliquando eveniet”. Best regards Maria _____________________________________...

Latin: a favour?, neuter pronoun, masculine noun
neuter pronoun, masculine noun, relative pronoun: Hello, Actually the phrase praefervidus quod instabilis” is wrong in Latin as the adjectives PRAEFERVIDUS and INSTABILIS are in the masculine, while the pronoun QUOD, they should agree with, is neuter. Therefore the correct Latin sentence should be...

Latin: a forgotten phrase..., singular present, imperfect tense
singular present, imperfect tense, correct translation: Hello, The correct translation of the phrase you mention is the following: -“Es, eras, eris semper amor meus in aeternum”. (You are, you were, you ll always be, my love eternally) Best regards, Maria _________________________________________________...

Latin: Generic meanings, fear and desire, generic sense
fear and desire, generic sense, declension: Hello, the Latin words for “fear” and “desire” in the most generic sense, as you say, are the following: “Fear” = TIMOR (nominative masculine singular. 3rd.declension) or METUS (nominative masculine singular. 4th.declension). This in a general...

Latin: God is my shield, case god, nominative case
case god, nominative case, latin word: Hello, Here’s the translation you asked me: “Deus meum est scutum”. Note that: -DEUS (nominative case) = God -MEUM (nominative neuter agreed with SCUTUM) = my -EST= is -SCUTUM (nominative neuter ) = shield Latin word order is different from...

Latin: Grammar, feminine noun, case gender
feminine noun, case gender, latin translations: Hello, in Latin there is an adjective which means exactly :”relating to human life on earth” or in general “relating to life on earth”/ pertaining to life on earth , as well as “dealing with the earth”. It is “terrestris” (in the nominative case masculine...

Latin: Great Seal of the United States, e pluribus unum, latin mottoes
e pluribus unum, latin mottoes, novus ordo: The reverse of the Great Seal of the United States, found on the reverse of the dollar bill, has two Latin mottoes: Annuit coeptis (He Has Favored Our Undertakings) and Novus Ordo Seclorum (A New Order of the Ages). On the obverse of the Great Seal is the...

Latin: Greek and Latin translations, latin translations, masculine pronoun
latin translations, masculine pronoun, latin alphabet: FOLLOW UP: As for some sites that translate an English word to Greek and Latin or say the meaning of a Greek or Latin word, they can be not reliable, unless you already have a good knowledge of Latin/Greek. ____________________________________________________...

Latin: general knowledge, latin equivalent, dative case
latin equivalent, dative case, invictus: Hello, Actually “envictus” does not exist in Latin, where there is “evinctus”, past participle of the verb “evincio” (I bind) and “evictus”, past participle of the verb “evinco” (I defeat, utterly, prevail). As for the antonym of the adjective “invictus”(invincible),i.e....

Latin: general phrases..., john c traupman, oral proficiency
john c traupman, oral proficiency, common phrases: Certainly you can use Latin for conversational purposes. After all, it has been used for 2500 years for that purpose, and still is. The list of even common phrases would be too much to give here, but there is a wonderful compilation of phrases, a dictionary,...

Latin: gun inscriptions, literal translation, phrasing
literal translation, phrasing, inscriptions: Hello, So, the only word you can insert for AD PROPULSANDUM is AD VITANDUM, which is a little shorter word than ‘propulsandum . If you want, you can insert also DATUM for DONATUM, so that the inscription becomes shorter. Therefore here s the phrase:...

Latin: Heart, classical latin, pectus
classical latin, pectus, public archive: No, that makes no grammatical sense in Latin. You could render that: Sequere cor tuum. ************************************************************ ************************************************************ Since you designed this question public,...

Latin: Two Hearts, homework subject, paper homework
homework subject, paper homework, syntactical problems: You could render that: Dua corda, amor una, semper. The rendition above won t work. It has syntactical problems and incorrect forms. Corda is better than viscera or pectora (plurals) in this sense. Semper captures the sense of the adverb in...

Latin: Hello Maria,Would it be..., beloved cat, lesbia
beloved cat, lesbia, sparrow: Dear Bernadette, I have translated your sentence into Latin. Here it is: “Fur sum apud lactis florem, apud focum somnium sum“. However, since these words might have sounded a bit weird to a Roman, I have thought of giving you an alternative, that...

Latin: Help with Caesar ch.XIII please., indirect discourse, direct discourse
indirect discourse, direct discourse, divico: Hi Stephen, Before I translate this passage as literally as possible, I have to tell you that these clauses are in the indirect discourse. In English, you know it is indirect discourse when you see the word that instead of quotation marks. For example:...

Latin: Help with Caesar please., caesar de bello gallico, de bello gallico
caesar de bello gallico, de bello gallico, purpose clause: Hi Stephen, Here s the translation of the passage “Allobrogibus sese vel persuasuros, quod nondum bono animo in populum Romanum viderentur, existimabant vel vi coacturos ut per suos finis eos ire paterentur.”(Caesar, De Bello Gallico,I, 6): “They (i.e....

Latin: Help with latin, latin motto, feminine noun
latin motto, feminine noun, family motto: Hi, actually the correct Latin motto should be “In fide et in bello fortes” in the nominative plural or “In fide et in bello fortis” in the nominative singular. In fact “forte” is wrong as in Latin it is a nominative neuter singular meaning literally...

Latin: Help with my novel, roman alphabet, writing a novel
roman alphabet, writing a novel, ancient rome: I would render it: O Iustiniane, intra. Transi ad illud tempus praeteritum et caliginosum. The letter J was a late addition to the alphabet (mediaeval/renaissance). Classically, it is just a consonental I . Yes, Iustinianus is Justinian. You...

Latin: Help with poetry question please., cambridge latin course, song of birds
cambridge latin course, song of birds, loose translation: Hello Stephen, Your translation is right indeed. In fact the passage - “See, the voices of men and the din of the streets and the songs of birds and faithful crowd of dogs are silent: I alone of all dread both sleep and bed, and follow your command,...

Latin: Help Translating, dative case, mottoes
dative case, mottoes, crescat: I would correct the first to: Hominis amicus optimus anas est. On the second, sometimes mediaeval spellings differ from the classical, or the mediaeval scripts can be misread. I m taking crevat as crescat. Thus, the sentence means: Thus may strong...

Latin: Help with a Translation Please, doubt, latin
doubt, latin, phrase: Hello, Often wrong, But never in Doubt can be translated literally into Latin as follows: “Saepe in errore, sed numquam in dubio” Also, more concisely: “Multi errores, nullum dubium “. Best regards Maria ___________________________________________...

Latin: Help with Translation, neuter plural, demonstrative pronoun
neuter plural, demonstrative pronoun, relative pronoun: Hello, Don t ever lose faith, courage or strength; these are your powers, your gifts can be translated as follows: 1-“Fiduciam et animi corporisque virtutem ne umquam perdideris. Quae tua sunt praesidia ornamentaque “, if ‘faith’ means ‘trust’, ‘confidence’....

Latin: Help translating phrase, latin translation, nice day
latin translation, nice day, phrase: Hello, “Fratri ac cervisiae” is the Latin translation for “To my brother and to my beer”. In fact: -FRATRI (dative case)means to my brother . Note that ‘my is not necessary in Latin as in this context that goes without saying. -AC means and -CERVISIAE...

Latin: Hi, english phrase, confido
english phrase, confido, correct spelling: Hello James, I’m glad you enjoy reading my answers. As for the English phrase “No escape” which in Italian is “Nessuna fuga”, here’s the translation into Latin: “Nulla fuga” Note that: -NULLA (adjective in the nominative feminine singular,...

Latin: Horse's name, vocative, nominative case
vocative, nominative case, pejorative sense: Hello, I could suggest “Amìcus” (in the nominative case) or “Amìce” ( in the vocative), and also “Carìssimus /Carìssime”, to denote that this horse is “a huge chap”, as you say. “Amicus”/”Amice” means in fact “friend”, while “Carissimus”/ “Carissime”...

Latin: House of the Dead, genitive plural, latin to english translation
genitive plural, latin to english translation, declension: Hello, the literal translation of “ The House of the Dead is “Mortuorum domus” where DOMUS (nominative, 4th.declension) means ‘the house’ and MORTUORUM (genitive plural, 2nd.declension) means ‘of the dead’. As you can see, Latin word order differs from...

Latin: I heard a saying on the radio..., latin translation, illegitimate child
latin translation, illegitimate child, mediaeval: The expression is: Illegitimis nil carborundum, meaning, a bit loosely: Don t let the bastards grind you down. It comes from a mediaeval university jingle. Illegitimis is an illegitimate child (a bastard). Carborundum is related to the very hard...

Latin: help....!, grateful thanks, phrase
grateful thanks, phrase, translation: Hi Michael, Thanks for explaining the sense of your phrase. So, here’s its translation as you ‘ve clarified: -“De via non declinavi, immo invenior “ Best, Maria _______________________________________--- I am not lost = DE VIA NON DECLINAVI...

Latin: help, versio vulgata, psalm of david
versio vulgata, psalm of david, latin bible: Hello, Here’s the Latin text of “The Lord is my light and my salvation. Whom shall I fear?” [ Psalm of David 26:1],as we read in the Vulgate: “Dominus inluminatio mea et salus mea. Quem timebo?” Best regards, Maria _____________________________________________________...

Latin: help with phrase, purpose clauses, person plural
purpose clauses, person plural, vinco: Hello, “venimus ut vincamus” means: “ We are coming to win”. In fact: -VENIMUS (present indicative, 1st.person plural of VENIO, I come) = We are coming. -UT (subordinating conjunction used for positive statement in the purpose clauses) = to /in...

Latin: Can you help with this sentence please?, caesar de bello gallico, de bello gallico
caesar de bello gallico, de bello gallico, c julius caesar: Hello Stephen, The correct translation is : “The Gauls quickly drove the Romans from a higher position into the river . In fact this phrase, which is modelled on the one we read in Caesar s Gallic War, book II, chapter 22 , wants to point out that...

Latin: Could you help me with this sentence please., verb sum, gerundive
verb sum, gerundive, quare: Hello Stephen, First of all your translation is correct. In fact “Haec est sententia mea, quam si dissenseris mutabo. Sed prius tibi explicandum erit quare dissentias” means exactly : This is my opinion, which I will change if you disagree. But first...

Latin: help with translation please., theatro, pauci
theatro, pauci, person plural: Quot spectatores heri in theatro fuistis? How many spectators were you yesterday in the theatre? Your instincts were right; it seems a bit strange to me as well. The second person plural must be being used here by the speaker to indicated that the addressee...

Latin: help, latin words, hodgepodge
latin words, hodgepodge, erunt: Hi, I m sorry, but this phrase is a hodgepodge of some Latin words and other terms which do not exist in Latin, like ‘trebuchetas for example. Therefore it s impossibile to traslate it as it has no sense. The only thing I can do is to give you the translation...

Latin: hi there just curious as to..., correct phrase, nominative case
correct phrase, nominative case, talis: Hi, First of all I must tell you that the correct phrase is in Latin “Talis est Vita “ which means exactly : Such is life! . In fact TALIS means “Such”; EST means “is” and VITA (not “vitae”) means “life”. Best regards, Maria ___________________________________________________________...

Latin: Imagination conquers reality., word translation, live forever
word translation, live forever, neuter: Hi, Imagination conquers reality would be in Latin as follows: -“Imaginandi vis res vincit veras “ or -“Vera vincit imaginatio . As for The unreal is more powerful than the real , in the sense that all living things die and decay, but...

Latin: Imperatives, deponent verbs, future tenses
deponent verbs, future tenses, imperatives: 1) Passive imperatives are regularly used if the sense calls for it -- which is not nearly as often as active imperatives. 2) The future imperative is occasionally used when there is a distinctive reference to the future (as with a future adverb) or in conjunction...

Latin: Improve Latin Attempt?, personal construction, latin phrase
personal construction, latin phrase, passive form: Hello, The Latin phrase VIDEBITUR QUOD VIDERI POTEST for That which can be seen, will be seen is grammatically correct, though it could be translated also as “That which can seem, will seem”, since the verb VIDERE (2nd.conjugation) in the passive can...

Latin: INTERPRETATION., latin translation, loquitur
latin translation, loquitur, phrase: Hello, Here‘s the Latin translation of the phrase The result speaks for itself : -“Exitus ipse loquitur” or: -« Exitus per se loquitur ». Best regards Maria ______________________________________ NOTA BENE The result = EXITUS(nominative) speaks...

Latin: Inferna tetigit, hercules furens, purpose clauses
hercules furens, purpose clauses, megara hercules: Hello Anita, First of all, there is a mistake in the sentence you mention as the subjunctive present ‘possit is wrong. In fact the correct form is ‘posset , a subjunctive imperfect, due to ‘consecutio temporum , i.e. the rule that governs which tense...

Latin: Inter vs. Intra, demonstrative adjective, singular form
demonstrative adjective, singular form, definite article: Inter denotes among or between, so between boys or among the boys is a reasonable meaning. Since Latin does not have a specific definite article ( the ), this can be supplied for the purposes of English as needed. Intra denotes within, as...

Latin: Interpretation, translation latin to english, shield crest
translation latin to english, shield crest, latin phrase: Hello Trevor, Actually I ve already answered this question you sent me. In fact I received your e-mail on June, 16th 2005 and answered on June, 17 , i.e. the day after. [ 6/16/2005 2:56:45 PM Translation: Latin to English / English to Latin Answered...

Latin: isaiah 52:14 in Vulgate, greek expression, correct translation
greek expression, correct translation, aspectus: Hello again, Well, in order to answer accurately your question, this time I resolved to see Septuagint Greek Text, Isaiah 52:14, since the Vulgate Latin by St. Jerome is a later translation. I realized therefore that there are some differences between...

Latin: Jussive noun clauses, noun clauses, imperfect subjunctive
noun clauses, imperfect subjunctive, present subjunctive: Hello, First of all, the correct sentence is: “Ei imperaveram ut domum iret”(I had ordered him to go home). Second, the sequence of tenses applies in jussive noun clauses too, though we do not use all the tenses of the “consecutio temporum” (=sequence...

Latin: That which does not kill will only serve to make you stronger, hi lauren, nota bene
hi lauren, nota bene, translations: Hi Lauren, Here are the translations you need: 1-“Quod te non occidit, te certe fortiorem reddere poterit”[That which does not kill will only serve to make you stronger ] 2-”Quod te non occidit, te fortiorem faciet”. [What does not kill will make...

Latin: I would like to know this phrase in Latin, vices and virtues, latin phrase
vices and virtues, latin phrase, roman historian: Hello, We are the product of heaven and hell” cannot be translated literally into Latin as such a phrase would make no sense. Anyway in Latin we can say: “Aequabilis mixtura sumus vitiorum atque virtutum”, as we read in Suetonius, Roman historian...

Latin: I would like to know how to write this in latin thanks, genitive case, spiritual perfection
genitive case, spiritual perfection, declension: Hello, “Spiritual perfection” is in Latin : “ Spiritus perfectio”. Best regards, Maria ___________________________________________________________ Please note that: -SPIRITUS (genitive case-4th declension) literally means ‘of the spirit , i.e....

Latin: LATIN DEFINITION, latin phrase, passive form
latin phrase, passive form, person plural: Hi again Rudy, The Latin phrase “Divisi cademus” means literally :”Divided we will fall”. In fact DIVISI (past participle, passive form, nominative masculine plural) means “divided”, while CADEMUS (future, 1st person plural) means “we will fall”. ...

Latin: LATIN/ENGLISH ODE TO PARENTS, honesty integrity, latin mother
honesty integrity, latin mother, latin english: Hello, If you want to translate into Latin “ Mother & father , honesty , integrity , eternal love” , you must say: “MATER et PATER, PROBITAS, INTEGRITAS, AETERNUS AMOR”. All the nouns(mater, pater, probitas, integritas, amor), as well as the adjective...

Latin: LATIN TO ENGLISH, latin translation, latin to english
latin translation, latin to english, spanish background: Hello, The correct Latin translation of house of love is the following: “Domus Amoris”. In fact DOMUS (nominative case) means ‘house’ and AMORIS (genitive case of AMOR, love) means ‘of love’, since Latin uses the genitive case to indicate a person...

Latin: LATIN FONT NAME, latin fonts, saint john the baptist
latin fonts, saint john the baptist, emperor tiberius: Hi Ivana, Here are the three names used by Roman people at the Christ time, i.e. when baptism(christening) was already introduced by Saint John the Baptist and Christianity began to spread into Roman world after Christ s death in 33 AD under the Emperor...

Latin: LATIN INTERPERTATION / HOW TO WRITE IN LATIN, term script, brahmi script
term script, brahmi script, nagari: Hello, 1-DEVANAGARI SCRIPT can be translated as follows: DEVANAGARI LITTERAE , where DEVANAGARI has no translation and SCRIPT is LITTERAE. In fact I must point out that DEVANAGARI cannot be translated because the Nagarî (lit. of the city ) or Devanagarî...

Latin: LATIN MOTTO, latin motto, latin translation
latin motto, latin translation, latin verb: Hello, First of all I must tell you that I know nothing about golf. Anyway, if in the sentences you mention the verb ‘to cut means ‘to cut in , ‘to cut across someone s path, ‘to get in someone s way ‘, we must use the Latin verb “ intercludere”...

Latin: LATIN PHRASE TRANSLATION, latin phrase translation, classical expressions
latin phrase translation, classical expressions, ablative case: Hello again Maura, Here s the literal translation of “Summa ope” and “Omni ope atque opera” : -“With utmost might and ability”. -“With the utmost efforts”. -“With the greatest exertion”. -“To the utmost of our power and ability “. In short,...

Latin: LATIN WORD, latin translation, latin word
latin translation, latin word, ablative: Hello, ANYTIME in the sense you mention is in Latin QUOLIBET TEMPORE or QUOVIS TEMPORE. Therefore the phrase “I am prepared to meet you ANYTIME” would be “QUOLIBET TEMPORE / QUOVIS TEMPORE te convenire paratus sum “. Please note that: -I am = SUM ...

Latin: Lacrymosa?, lacrymosa dies illa, latin hymn
lacrymosa dies illa, latin hymn, requiem aeternam: Hello, First of all “Lacrimosa (not ‘lacrymosa’) dies illa” is the first line of the penultimate strophe of DIES IRAE (day of wrath ), a medieval Latin hymn describing Judgment Day, written by the Italian Franciscan friar, Tommaso da Celano, ( fl. 13th...

Latin: Latin, feminine noun, accusative plural
feminine noun, accusative plural, filias: Hello, MULTAS is in Latin the accusative feminine plural of the adjective MULTUS(masculine)-MULTA(feminine)-MULTUM(neuter) which generally means MUCH , MANY, A LOT OF , according to the context. For example: “Multas habet filias” (he has many daughters)...

Latin: Latin, latin phrase, translation 2
latin phrase, translation 2, solus: Hello, “Christ Alone. Word Alone. Faith Alone and Grace alone” can be translated as follows: 1-“Christus Solum. Solum Verbum (Scriptura). Fides Solum et Solum Gratia . Please note that in this phrase I used the adverb SOLUM (invariable), instead of...

Latin: Latin, person plural, pronouns
person plural, pronouns, singular: Hello, The phrase The truth will set you free” can be translated into Latin as follows: 1- Veritas vos liberabit or Veritas vos liberos faciet , if « you » refers to a 2nd.person plural. 2- Veritas te liberabit or Veritas te liberum faciet...

Latin: Latin?, latin inscriptions, medieval tapestries
latin inscriptions, medieval tapestries, northern scotland: Hello, As for a translation into Latin of the phrase Until by magic reborn”, I can tell you that it could be translated as follows: “Usque magicum ad vitam reditum”. As for what would be the proper language for this phrase given the historical...

Latin: Latin, strength and honour, fortitudo
strength and honour, fortitudo, potestas: Hello, “Strength and honour” is in Latin: -“Fortitudo et Honor”, if ‘strength’ (FORTITUDO) means inner strength rather than physical, i.e. ‘Strength of mind’, ‘fortitude’. -“Virtus et Honor”, if ‘strength’ (VIRTUS) means ‘valour’, ‘courage’. -“Vis...

Latin: Latin, latin word, word order
latin word, word order, role model: Hello Tom, the command Be your own role model” in the meaning of “Don t copy others; lead yourself”, can be rendered in Latin this way: “Noli alios imitari, at contra te rege ipsum”. Note that : -NOLI IMITARI = Don t copy -ALIOS = others -AT...

Latin: Latin, correct translation, nominative plural
correct translation, nominative plural, passive form: Hello, You are right: “sententia vadum non cado in diligo sic facile “ is absolutely wrong. So, here’s the correct translation of “Thou shall not fall in love so easily”: “Haud facile capieris amore “ . (See below for a grammatical analysis) ...

Latin: Latin, latin phrase, latin word
latin phrase, latin word, accusative: Hello, The Latin phrase “Periculum concordiam parit“ means : ”Danger begets concord” in the sense that a common danger produces harmony and then unity. Best regards, Maria __________________________________________________________ Note that: ...

Latin: Latin, person plural imperative, latin verbs
person plural imperative, latin verbs, latin phrases: Hello, Here are the translations you need: -“Ignosce mihi!” or “Mihi ignosce!” (Sorry!), if you are addressing to a 2nd.person singular (i.e. to one person). -“Mihi ignoscite!” or “Ignoscite mihi!” (Sorry!), if you are addressing to a 2nd.person...

Latin: Latin, adjective pronoun, neuter plural
adjective pronoun, neuter plural, dative case: Hello, Here’s the translation of “ Family is everything”: “Omnia mihi est familia”. In this phrase it is the same for a male as a female. Regards, Maria _____________________________________ Note that: -Family = FAMILIA (nominative case,...

Latin: Latin, good courage, god is my strength
good courage, god is my strength, audacia: Hello, Here are the meanings of ‘Fortitudo’, ‘Audacia’, ‘Animus’ and the context where Latin uses each of these nouns: 1-FORTITUDO (nominative case, 3rd.declension) means “strength” exactly in the mental or spiritual sense, i.e. ‘firmness’ as inner...

Latin: Latin, prose and poetry, first person singular
prose and poetry, first person singular, future tense: Word order is quite flexible in Latin because most of the syntactical information is contained in the inflexional endings on words. Also, the order and rhythms differ between prose and poetry. Carpe diem comes from an ode of Horace, and is poetry, requiring...

Latin: Latin, mahatma ghandi, latin word
mahatma ghandi, latin word, grammatical analysis: Hello, Here’s the translation you asked me: “Ex indomita voluntate, non ex corporis viribus fortitudo oritur”. See below for grammatical analysis. Best regards, Maria ___________________________________________________ First of all I must...

Latin: Latin, latin phrase, correct translation
latin phrase, correct translation, literal translation: Hello, Live with your head (or, ‘mind ), but love with your heart is the literal translation of the Latin phrase:”Vive mente, corde ama”. Anyway I think it s far better to translate it as follows: ”Live rationally, but love passionately” Best...

Latin: Latin, pharse, nice day
pharse, nice day, deus: Hello “The god in me recognises the god in you” is in Latin: “Deus qui est in me recognoscit Deum qui est in te » Have a nice day. Maria _____________________ NB. The god =DEUS in me =QUI EST IN ME recognises =RECOGNOSCIT the god =DEUM in...

Latin: Latin, renditions, heaps
renditions, heaps, notion: There is no one-to-one relationship between any one language and another. The notion of a translation is, in fact, flawed at its base. That is why you may have various renditions, which are all by their nature imperfect. The simplest way of putting it...

Latin: Latin, latin sentences, slang expression
latin sentences, slang expression, latin expression: Hello, We will have no Mong Fodder here can be translated into Latin as follows: 1-“Mong Fodder hic non habebimus” (literal). or: 2-“Mong Fodder hic non erit” In these Latin sentences I did not translate the English expression ‘Mong Fodder...

Latin: Latin, family motto, latin sentence
family motto, latin sentence, aucta: Hello Catherine, Your family motto can be translated into English literally or metaphorically. So, Nobilitas avorum calcaribus aucta means literally : “Ancestors Nobility increased by the spurs ”. where NOBILITAS(nominative) is ‘nobility ;...

Latin: Latin, ablative case, accusative
ablative case, accusative, gerund: Hello, The phrase “You can reach Rome by asking questions” is in Latin as follows: “Romam petere quaerendo potes” Have a nice day. Maria _______________________________________________________ NOTA BENE You can= POTES Reach= PETERE Rome= ROMAM...

Latin: Latin, latin maria, latin translation
latin maria, latin translation: Hello, the Latin translation of Be a better man” is: Melior esto . Best, Maria _____________________________________________ Please note that: Be = ESTO A better man= MELIOR. In Latin, ‘Melior literally means ‘better , but in this context...

Latin: Latin adverb construction, english sentences, prepositional phrase
english sentences, prepositional phrase, secondary emphasis: Both constructions are common in Classical Latin. The difference is somewhat subtle (as Latin often is), even stylistic. The simple prepositional phrase (post tres dies) denotes directly the passage of time involved. The other construction is really an...

Latin: Latin annotation, prepositional phrase, infinitive
prepositional phrase, infinitive, hac: With a such a small fragment, it is impossible to know the context, but it is likely that quae is a connective relative ( which things ), associating this sentence to what is being referred to (the things being commented up in the main text). In that case,...

Latin: Latin distich, guillaume durand, dominical letters
guillaume durand, dominical letters, domat: Hello, This distich, attributed to Guillaume Durand, Bishop of Mende,is merely a nonsense mnemonic phrase to recall the Dominical letters for the first day of each month, i.e. the first row of the table for days, since once you know the first row, you can...

Latin: Latin to Engligh Translation - honor and friendship, latin words, genitive plural
latin words, genitive plural, nominative case: Hi, The Latin words for “Honor and Friendship” are : “Honor et Amicitia” or “Honos et Amicitia”. In fact HONOR or HONOS (nominative case) correspond exactly to the English term ‘honor ,which obviously derives from Latin, while AMICITIA matches ‘friendship...

Latin: Latin to English, e pluribus unum, signet ring
e pluribus unum, signet ring, world war 2: Hi Steve, As I’ve already said, the correct phrase is E PLURIBUS UNUM, not E LEURIBUS UNUM, since the word LEURIBUS which is obviously a typographical error does not exist in Latin. It’s also possible that it is difficult to read the exact inscription...

Latin: Latin to English translation needed please:), latin to english translation, quam deficere
latin to english translation, quam deficere, latin translation: Hello, Here are the translations you asked me. -”Melius est exstingui quam deficere” . Please note that: MELIUS is ‘better ; EST is ‘it s ; EXSTINGUI is ‘to burn out ;QUAM is ‘than ; DEFICERE is fade away . -“ Inimico sidere editus”. Note...

Latin: Latin to English, roman holidays, golden fleece
roman holidays, golden fleece, latin to english: Hello, Glad to have been helpful to you in reference to the previous translation. As for the current question, first of all I have to point out that the term EMERITUS (singular)/ EMERITI (plural) which in English is related to one “who is retired but...

Latin: Latin endings, carmen arvale, quirinal hill
carmen arvale, quirinal hill, goddess diana: Hello, Yes, it is true: the Archaic Latin, i.e. the earliest recorded Latin, found in inscriptions from the beginning of the sixth century BC,borrowed some endings from Greek. See for example the nominative singular -OS , the accusative singular -OM,...

Latin: Latin equivalent, latin translation, latin equivalent
latin translation, latin equivalent, latin word: Hello, Here’s the Latin translation of Not pride of knowledge but humility of wisdom “: “Non scientiae superbia, sed modestia sapientiae”. Best regards, Maria ________________________________________________ Not = NON (adverb) pride = SUPERBIA...

Latin: Latin help, grammar mistake, latin sentence
grammar mistake, latin sentence, latin phrase: Hello, the Latin sentence “In somnio vivimus, in notstra Domo vera, Regno Dei, excitabimus” contains some mistakes which are the following: -one typo (‘notstra’ instead of “nostra”) -one grammar mistake, i.e. ‘excitabimus’ which is a transitive verb...

Latin: Latin Imperative, weak vowel, personal translation
weak vowel, personal translation, translation project: The command form, or imperative, in Latin is the root of the present system (drop -re from the present infinitive, or second principal part listed in dictionaries) for the singular imperative. Add -te for the plural imperative (when commanding more than...

Latin: Latin language term?, latin words, latin language
latin words, latin language, fictional characters: Hello, The only Latin words you can use for your purpose are: 1-PRIMUS meaning exactly ‘first 2-INITIALIS meaning ‘initial ; ‘from the first . These terms are not names in reality, but adjectives that however you can use as characters names. ...

Latin: Latin in law, western legal tradition, latin phrases
western legal tradition, latin phrases, grammar and usage: Latin is used because our western legal tradition is based in Roman Law. These phrases have an exact meaning, as Latin is an extremely precise language in a way that modern vernaculars, particularly English, are not. Moreover, these phrases have been honed...

Latin: Latin Motto, latin motto, latin phrase
latin motto, latin phrase, nominative case: Hello, The correct Latin phrase for Disciplined Study and Excellence is Studium, Disciplina, Excellentia . All these three nouns are in the nominative case, of course. Please note that “Disciplined study” corresponds to STUDIUM and DISCIPLINA,...

Latin: Latin motto, latin motto, god is my strength
latin motto, god is my strength, fortitudo: Hello, Here are the translations you asked me. “The Lord is my strength” = “Dominus mea est fortitudo” or more concisely: ”Dominus fortitudo mea” (without the verb). God is my strength = “Deus mea est fortitudo” or more concisely: Deus...

Latin: Latin motto, latin motto, simul
latin motto, simul, direct object: Hello, Together we protect can be translated into Latin as follows: -“Simul defendimus” or “Simul protegimus”. -“Una defendimus” or “Una protegimus”. I must however point out that in Latin it would better to say what or who we are protecting,...

Latin: Latin motto, one bad apple, latin motto
one bad apple, latin motto, lonesome dove: UVA UVAM VIDENDO VARIA FIT. A grape by seeing a grape becomes varied [in color]. The sense is that a grape next to another grape darkens, to the point of spoilage. The old proverb, which is used in the Lonesome Dove, is more or less equivalent to our...

Latin: Latin movies, finnish broadcasting company, international broadcast
finnish broadcasting company, international broadcast, spoken conversation: Hello, The only one movie I can suggest is “The Passion of the Christ “ directed by Mel Gibson. It depicts the last twelve hours of Christ’s life on earth and contains some phrases spoken in Latin, besides those spoken in Aramaic. Hope this helps....

Latin: Latin Phrase, fortune favours the brave, latin phrase
fortune favours the brave, latin phrase, latin sentence: Hi Danny! Your translation “ No fear; fortune favours the brave” is correct, while on the contrary there is a mistake in the Latin sentence which must be: “Nullus metus; fortibus fortuna favet” as the verb ‘faveo‘ (I favour) takes the dative case, i.e....

Latin: Latin Phrases, latin phrases, word translations
latin phrases, word translations, romance languages: Those online translators are worthless. They re bad enough for the Romance languages, but when it comes to Latin, they re impossible! You can render those phrases as follows: From the cross comes salvation = De cruce venit salus Family first ...

Latin: Latin Poem, latin poem, latin translation
latin poem, latin translation, vita life: Hello, first of all here’s the correct Latin translation of the English text: Vehementer vive et fortunam tempta, aliquando tibi haec arridebit vita. Verus esto ac probus, flumen est vita, Rectus sta ac vitam somniumque vive. As for your translation,...

Latin: Latin phrase, latin phrase, accusative case
latin phrase, accusative case, correct sentence: Hello Pat, So,“Carpe lex” is not grammatically correct. The correct sentence is: “Carpe legem”(Seize the Law). In Latin in fact the direct object is always put in the accusative case and ‘legem is exactly the accusative singular of the Latin noun...

Latin: Latin phrase, english proverb, latin phrase
english proverb, latin phrase, time and tide: Hello, The English phrase “Time and tide wait for no man” can be translated into Latin as follows: “Tempus et maris aestus neminem expectant”. (Literal translation). Please note that TEMPUS is ‘time ; ET is ‘and ; MARIS AESTUS is ‘tide ; NEMINEM...

Latin: Latin phrase, latin phrase, accusative case
latin phrase, accusative case, correct word: Hello, I m sorry, but the phrase you mention, i.e. “nostrum fuglium sentorum” is absolutely wrong in Latin as the only one correct word is NOSTRUM , masculine singular accusative case of an adjective meaning ‘our . As for ‘fuglium , the correct term...

Latin: Latin phrase, bart king, latin phrase
bart king, latin phrase, personal translation: ILLEGITIMIS NIL CARBORUNDUM. Don t let the bastards grind you down. From the mediaeval jingle, Si te dominorum vis/Facit furibundum,/ Dico illegitimis Nichil carborundum. Carborundum in this syntax is an impersonal passive periphrastic and...

Latin: Latin phrase, feminine strength, latin phrase
feminine strength, latin phrase, fortitudo: Hello, Strength from within” can be translated into Latin as follows: -“Intima fortitudo” In fact: -INTIMA (adjective in the nominative feminine agreed with FORTITUDO )=‘from within’ -FORTITUDO (nominative feminine) = ‘strength’. Please...

Latin: Latin phrase, latin dictionaries, latin phrase
latin dictionaries, latin phrase, anne elliott: Hello Anne, Here are the translations you need: 1-“Ex septemptrionalibus veritas” ( truth from the North”.) 2- “Ex septemptrionali parte venit veritas” ( the truth comes from the North ) . Please note that: -EX ( preposition which takes the...

Latin: Latin phrase, caius julius caesar, person pronoun
caius julius caesar, person pronoun, latin phrase: Hello, Legi, intellexi, condemnavi , as an adaptation of Caesar’s famous phrase “Veni, vidi, vici “ means exactly I read, I understood, I condemned. As for You read, did not understand, and condemned , here’s the translation: -“Legisti, non...

Latin: Latin phrase, feminine noun, latin phrase
feminine noun, latin phrase, nocte: Hello, “Proxima nocte”(ablative of time) does not have a double meaning, but means only “the next night”, while the expression “the last night” / “the preceding night” translates as “Superiore nocte”. Have a nice day, Maria __________________________________________________...

Latin: Latin phrase verification, english to latin translation, latin phrase
english to latin translation, latin phrase, commemorative logo: Hello, thanks for clarifying the meaning of the phrase I see dead people” which therefore can be translated into Latin as follows: “Mortuos contemplor” Please note that: -MORTUOS (accusative plural) means dead people . -CONTEMPLOR (deponent...

Latin: Latin phrase for a writing project, latin expression, latin phrase
latin expression, latin phrase, empire of the sun: Hello, Though this is a hypothetical question having no practical purpose, of course, as you already said, I could play along with you and then suggest the following Latin expression: -“Summum Universi Imperium”. Or: -“Universi Imperium”. Both...

Latin: Latin phrase?, military treatise, latin phrase
military treatise, latin phrase, army veteran: Hello, The Latin phrase you wrote means literally: “Peace is prepared by means of (with) war”. [PARATUR=is prepared;PAX=peace;BELLO=by means of (with) war]. This sentence is not a real Latin quotation, but merely a kind of adaptation of a Latin...

Latin: Latin proverb, latin proverb, tuam
latin proverb, tuam, vitam: Hello, “Live your own life, for you will die your own death” would be in Latin : “Tuam ipsam vive vitam quia tuam ipsam oppetes mortem”. Best, Maria ____________________________________ Live = VIVE (imperative, 2nd.pers. sing) your = TUAM (accusative)...

Latin: Latin Quotation, latin phrase, latin sentence
latin phrase, latin sentence, gustus: Hello, The Latin phrase “De gustibus non est disputandum “ or “De gustibus non disputandum” means literally: ”It has to be not disputed about tastes”, i.e. “There must be no discussion regarding tastes”/ We ought not to dispute about tastes” / “There’s...

Latin: Latin question, latin guide, invenio
latin guide, invenio, latin word: Hello, Both the phrases “I ll either find a way or make one. Guide me “ / “I ll either find a way or make one. Be my guide” translate as follows: -“Viam aut inveniam aut faciam. Me rege, quaeso!” Or: -“Viam aut inveniam aut faciam. Dirige me, quaeso!”...

Latin: Latin for Revelation, book of revelation, latin verb
book of revelation, latin verb, revelation of jesus christ: Hello, the Latin for Revelation, as in the Book of Revelation, is “Apocalypsis” or “Revelatio”. The first term, APOCALYPSIS, just used by St. John in his “Apocalypsis Iesu Christi” (literally, ‘Revelation of Jesus Christ’, i.e. ‘The Book of Revelation’...

Latin: Latin Sayings or phrases, latin sayings, latin phrase
latin sayings, latin phrase, adelaide australia: Hi, Your sentence Inspiration is all around can be translated into Latin as follows: “Afflatus ingeniique vis est ubicumque ». or more concisely : “Ubicumque afflatus” (classical Latin). “Ubicumque inspiratio” (late Latin). Finally I...

Latin: Latin sentence translation, latin sentence, sentence translation
latin sentence, sentence translation, passive form: Hello, the phrase “Vita a multis in bello amittetur”(in the passive form) means literally: “In war life will be lost by many people”, i.e.: “Many people will die in war”(active form) Have a nice day, Maria _________________________________________________________...

Latin: Latin (?) spelling help, salient points, english word
salient points, english word, epitome: The word is not Latin, but French, although the root is Latin. The pronunciation you gave is French. The word you re looking for is precis. It comes through French from the Latin praecisus, from which we get our English word precise, although that...

Latin: Latin Translation, latin to english translators, squadron motto
latin to english translators, squadron motto, machine chess: Yes, those translators are pretty worthless, aren t they? Language and thought are much too complex to be stuck into some kind of machine. Chess maybe; language no! In any case, trying to be as pithy as possible for the way these mottos are typically...

Latin: Latin Translation, massacre of the innocents, latin translation
massacre of the innocents, latin translation, translation translation: Hello, “The massacre of the Innocents” is in Latin: “Caedes Innocentium “ or “Caedes sanctorum Innocentium”. In fact CAEDES matches ‘the massacre’ and INNOCENTIUM or SANCTORUM INNOCENTIUM corresponds exactly to “of the Innocents”. Best, Maria...

Latin: Latin Translation, latin translation, latin phrase
latin translation, latin phrase, literal translation: Hello, The phrase “So that others may live” can be translated into Latin as follows: -“Ut ceteri vivere possint” (literal translation) or more concisely: -” Ut ceteri vivant” Please note that : UT (conjunction)= so that CETERI (nominative)= others...

Latin: Latin Translation, latin translation, templum
latin translation, templum, religious interests: Hello, Sanctuary through Community” cannot be translated literally because it would make no sense in Latin where the best translation would be as follows: “Ubi vitae communitas, ibi sacra aedes “(literally, “Where there is a community, there is a sanctuary”)....

Latin: Latin Translation, ecclesiastical latin, latin translation
ecclesiastical latin, latin translation, singular plural: Hello, -“Domino confide (or confidite )”[classical Latin] or: -“In Domino confide(or confidite )”[ecclesiastical Latin] Please note that the only one difference between these translations is that in classical Latin we must use the Dative (DEO)...

Latin: Latin Translation, latin translation, ancient languages
latin translation, ancient languages, classical latin: Hello, Actually I’ve already answered this question you asked me in the category “Ancient languages”. Therefore I’ll repeat that the translation of “Family is where the heart is” into classical Latin is: “Ubi cor, ibi familia”. The only thing I can...

Latin: Latin Translation., latin translation, latin word
latin translation, latin word, club badge: Hi, Both “Better Hated for Being Great than Loved for being Average” and “Better Hated Being Great Than Loved Being Average” can be translated into Latin as follows: “Odio excellentia affici melius est quam mediocritate amari”. Best regards,...

Latin: Latin Translation, latin translation, de fato
latin translation, de fato, literal translation: Hello, The best translation into Latin for What is meant to be, will be is a quotation from Cicero’s De Fato (On Fate), 31, where we read: “Omnia fato fiunt” (literally, “Everything happen because of fate” which corresponds essentially to What...

Latin: Latin Translation, latin author, latin translation
latin author, latin translation, latin word: Hello, If you want a literal translation of “Live for today as tomorrow is not promised”, here it is: -“Vive hodie, quia crastinus non promittitur dies”. Note that: -Live = VIVE (imperative, 2nd.person singular,from VIVO) -for today = HODIE...

Latin: Latin Translation, latin declension, adverbs of place
latin declension, adverbs of place, personal pronoun: Hello, Here are the translations you asked me: 1-“ Vehementer vive” ( “Live vibrantly ). 2-“Eo vola quo me cor ducit meum” (“Fly where my heart leads me”). See below for grammatical analysis. Best, Maria ___________________________________________________________...

Latin: Latin Translation, jim rohn, latin translation
jim rohn, latin translation, grammatical analysis: Hello, First of all there is no literal translation of the sentence “Don t wish it were easier, wish you were better” by Jim Rohn, an American motivational speaker. Anyway, there is a Latin equivalent sentence which reads as follows: -“Noli in...

Latin: Latin Translation, latin romance, chinese lettering
latin romance, chinese lettering, latin translation: Hi Jo, I m sorry, but your translation is absolutely wrong as translations into Latin require a good knowledge of this language, which a dictionary alone cannot provide as well as an online translator that is virtually worthless. So, Another day always...

Latin: Latin Translation, latin translation, latin word
latin translation, latin word, declension: Hello, Here’s the translation of My time will come : -“Tempus veniet meum” Kind regards, Maria __________________________________________ Note that: -My = MEUM (nominative neuter of MEUS, agreed with TEMPUS) -time = TEMPUS (nominative...

Latin: Latin Translation, latin translation, moral corruption
latin translation, moral corruption, female person: Hi Stephanie, Clean and sober can be rendered as: 1-“ Castus ac sobrius ”, if ‘clean means ‘free from moral corruption , and ‘sober means ‘sparing in the use of food and drink . 2-“Purus ac moderatus”, if ‘clean refers to ‘purity, i.e. the...

Latin: Latin Translation, latin translation, ipsi
latin translation, ipsi, verum: Hi Eimhear, “Be true to yourself can be translated into Latin as follows: 1”Tuam sequere naturam ” if the phrase Be true to yourself means that you know your values, and are guided in all things by your own conscience. 2- Verum dic tibi ipsi...

Latin: Latin Translation, latin translation, nisi
latin translation, nisi, nice day: Hello, Actually I think you want to say :”If it will be it will be. If it wont be it wont be . S, this phrase can be translated into Latin as follows: -“Si id accidet, accidet. Nisi accidet, non accidet” or: -“ Si id accidet, sane accidat. Nisi...

Latin: Latin Translation, roman circus, latin translation
roman circus, latin translation, latin word: Hello, I am glad to help you. “Metam tetigi” means “I reached my goal”. In fact, METAM (accusative case) means ‘goal , while TETIGI means “I reached”. ‘Tetigi is the perfect [i.e. past] tense, 1st.person singular, of the verb TANGO which has many...

Latin: Latin Translation, latin translation, latin equivalent
latin translation, latin equivalent, translation 1: Hello again Reece, Both “TUAM HONORA STIRPEM and TUUM HONORA GENUS are appropriate. So you can choose which you prefer. As for “ To my family, I owe everything ”, here is the translation: “Omnia meae debeo familiae”. Note that : -To my=MEAE ...

Latin: Latin Translation, tony campolo, seven day week
tony campolo, seven day week, ecclesiastical latin: Hello, First of all, sorry for the delay in replying, but AllExperts did not work. Also sorry for the previuos answer which was related to another questioner, indeed! Finally, here s my answer to YOUR question. It s Friday, but Sunday s coming...

Latin: Latin Translation HELP!, latin declension, latin translation
latin declension, latin translation, translation help: Hello, Fly on your own wings as a command/advice translates as: -“Alis vola tuis”. Or less well: -“Tuis propriis vola alis” Best regards, Maria __________________________________________________ Note that: -ALIS (ablative of mean in the...

Latin: Latin Translation needed, c julius caesar, latin translation
c julius caesar, latin translation, roman senate: Hi Richard, Here are the translations you need. - We came, we saw, we taught “Venimus, vidimus, docuimus” - We come, we see, we teach. “Venimus, videmus, docemus” Best regards Maria _________________________________________________...

Latin: Latin Translation needed, c julius caesar, latin translation
c julius caesar, latin translation, roman senate: Hi Richard, Here are the translations you need. - We came, we saw, we taught “Venimus, vidimus, docuimus” - We come, we see, we teach. “Venimus, videmus, docemus” Best regards Maria _________________________________________________ NB....

Latin: Latin Translation Please, latin phrase, latin translation
latin phrase, latin translation, intus: Hello, Good for good s sake can be literally translated into Latin as follows: “Bonum gratia boni”. This translation in fact paraphrases the Latin phrase “Ars Gratia Artis” meaning exactly Art for the sake of art or “ Art for Art s Sake . As...

Latin: Latin Translation please..., latin translation, literal translation
latin translation, literal translation, possum: Hello, Here s the translation you asked me: “Tui sicut mei oblivisci non possum, Te vere relinquere nequeo “. I must point out that, although this is not a literal translation which is impossible in this case, it corresponds however faithfully...

Latin: Latin Translation for Strength, latin translation, many different ways
latin translation, many different ways, latin words: Hello, The English word “Strength can be translated into Latin in many different ways, according to its different meaning. So here are these translations: 1- VIRTUS , if strength means bravery , gallantry , “valour”. 2- FORTITUDO or “AUDACIA”...

Latin: Latin Translation, latin translation, naval ship
latin translation, naval ship, local college: Hello Michael, I visited the link you said. So, Ship from Hell is literally in Latin: ”AB INFERNIS NAVIS”, meaning a ship which comes from Hell. In Latin however such translation does not give the impression that the ship is large, powerful,...

Latin: Latin translation, rough conversion, masculine noun
rough conversion, masculine noun, latin translation: Luke - Lucas (Latinized Greek) Julian - Julianus (a Roman emperor s name) Craig - This derives from Old English. There is no Latin equivalent, but if you wanted to do a rough conversion to a second-declension masculine noun, you might use ...

Latin: Latin translation, latin sentences, latin translation
latin sentences, latin translation, correct translation: Hello Travis, Here s the correct translation of the phrase “Honor myself as my word “ where “Honor “ is an imperative, 2nd.person singular, and “word” means “word of honor”: -“Me ipsum honora sicut fidem meam”. or: -“Me ipsum honora aeque ac fidem...

Latin: Latin translation, feminine noun, latin translation
feminine noun, latin translation, religious belief: Hello, “Amor fides est” is correct, if ‘faith’(Latin, ‘fides’) means “loyalty, fidelity, confidence”, as I suppose. Best regards, Maria ________________________________________________________ In Latin the feminine noun FIDES (5th.declension) can...

Latin: Latin translation, roman catholic church, ecclesiastical latin
roman catholic church, ecclesiastical latin, latin translation: Hello, In Latin the noun “sinner” (male person) is “Peccator” (nominative case), while the genitive case is “Peccatoris”, as Latin is an inflected language, of course, where the words change ending according to their grammatical role. If on the contrary...

Latin: Latin translation, latin phrase, latin translation
latin phrase, latin translation, vocative: Hello, The approximate Latin phrase Me transmitte sursum, Caledoni!” which is written above the door to the planetarium ( Star Trek in South Park) can be translated as follows: “ Send me up, Scotsman! . In fact : -“Send “ is TRANSMITTE( imperative...

Latin: Latin translation, latin translation, eternal sunshine
latin translation, eternal sunshine, latin word: Hello, Here’s the translation of “Eternal sunshine’: -« Aeterna lux solis » or with a different word order: -“Lux solis aeterna ». Please note that AETERNA (nominative case in the feminine agreed with LUX) is ‘eternal’, while LUX SOLIS is ‘sunshine’...

Latin: Latin translation, st augustine of hippo, augustine of hippo
st augustine of hippo, augustine of hippo, latin translation: Hello, “In Christ and for Christ” is in Latin “In Christo et pro Christo”, as we read in St. Augustine of Hippo. As for “In him and for him”, it is “In eo et pro eo”, of course. Best regards, Maria _________________________________________ NOTA...

Latin: Latin translation, neuter plural, family motto
neuter plural, family motto, latin translation: Hello, The only one correct translation for Everything Or Nothing” is the following: “Aut Omnia aut Nihil” In fact: -AUT...AUT = ‘or’. Note that in Latin you must add AUT (or) at the beginning of the phrase and repeat it after the first word (everything)....

Latin: Latin translation, neuter plural, personal crest
neuter plural, personal crest, latin translation: Hello Randi, “Qui sub argentea errant astra” is the translation of “Those who wander under silver stars . Please note that: -Those who = QUI -wander =ERRANT -under = SUB -silver =ARGENTEA (accusative neuter plural of the adjective ARGENTEUS agreed...

Latin: Latin translation, liguria italy, latin translation
liguria italy, latin translation, english phrase: Hi Gary, I’m well, thanks. So, here’s the translation of “Everywhere you go, always take the weather with you , though such a phrase could sound quite strange in Latin, especially with regard to take the weather with you . -“Quocumque vadis, caelum...

Latin: Latin translation, latin translation, audeo
latin translation, audeo, liberum: Hello, The phrase “My heart is free...have courage to follow it” can be translated into Latin as follows: -“Liberum meum est cor....id sequi aude “ Best regards, Maria _________________________________ Note that: -My = MEUM (adjective possessive...

Latin: Latin translation, latin translation, person plural
latin translation, person plural, sumus: Hello, The correct Latin for : We think, therefore we are is: “Cogitamus, ergo sumus”. Best regards Maria __________________________________ NB. We think= COGITAMUS (1st.person plural-present indicative of Cogitare ) therefore =ERGO we are=...

Latin: Latin translation, relative pronoun, latin translation
relative pronoun, latin translation, dative plural: Hi, here’s the translation you asked me: “Eis quos amo vivo or: Iis quos amo vivo Kind regards, Maria ______________________________ GRAMMATICAL ANALYSIS -I live = VIVO -for those = EIS or iis (dative plural of the pronoun IS)QUOS...

Latin: Latin translation, echoes in eternity, fellow travellers
echoes in eternity, fellow travellers, fellow traveller: Hello Deborah, Actually the phrase Hail, fellow travellers can be translated simply as “Ave, comites!” instead of Ave comites viatores , since the word “comites” means exactly “fellow travellers” and then the Latin term “viatores” (travellers) is not...

Latin: Latin translation, personal pronoun, latin translation
personal pronoun, latin translation, accusative case: Hello, Here’s the translation you asked me: -“Inter nos deambulant angeli” Best regards, Maria _________________________________- Note that: -Angels = ANGELI (nominative plural of ANGELUS, 2nd.declension) -Walk = DEAMBULANT (from DEAMBULARE,...

Latin: Latin translation, latin translation, phrases
latin translation, phrases, translations: Hello, Glad to help you. So, here are the translations you need. -“What do you ask of me, O Lord my God? = “Quid a me petis, Domine?” - You commanded your people long ago, O Lord my God. = “Iam dudum populo imperavisti tuo, Domine!“. All...

Latin: Latin translation, latin translation, proverb
latin translation, proverb, eos: Hello, If you can t join them, beat them! can be translated into Latin as follows: “Nisi eos tibi valde adiungere potes, eos vince!” Best regards Maria _____________________________________ NOTA BENE If you can t = NISI POTES join =TIBI VALDE...

Latin: Latin translation, ancient greek philosophers, latin translation
ancient greek philosophers, latin translation, ancient greeks: Hello, The phrase you mention is a quote from Diogenes of Sinope (412-323 BC), Greek philosopher, said to be the most representative of Cynicism, i.e. the philosophy of a group of ancient Greeks called the Cynics, founded by Antisthenes, a follower of...

Latin: Latin translation, latin translation, literal translations
latin translation, literal translations, sayings: Hi Mark! Revenge is a dish best served cold cannot be literally translated into Latin. Anyway, though a literal translations cannot be done, we can say: Voluptas ultionis melius longo degustatur intervallo , which literally means: The pleasure...

Latin: Latin translation, michael haydn, latin translation
michael haydn, latin translation, latin text: This is used in the Common Mass and Office for a Confessor Pontiff. It is based loosely upon Ecclesiasticus 44:16 et seq. Many Gradualia are not quoted exactly from Scripture, but use a scriptural passage as their basis. That one serves as a setting for...

Latin: Latin translation, imo corde, ablative case
imo corde, ablative case, latin translation: Hi Ryan, The expression “Blood brothers” is in Latin as follows: “Sanguine fratres”. As for From the heart , it is : Ab imo pectore” or “Ab imo corde”. Greetings from Italy, Maria _________________________________ Please note that in...

Latin: Latin translation, latin declension, latin translation
latin declension, latin translation, correct translation: Hello Danny, Both “Deus iudex est meus” and “Deus meus est iudex are correct. In fact these translations mean the same thing just phrased differently as Latin word order can be variable and often depends on writing style of an author. This however is...

Latin: Latin translation for the Art of Leadership., art of leadership, latin translation
art of leadership, latin translation, latin verb: Hello, In classical Latin we have a noun, DUCTUS (Nominative masculine, 4th.declension), which indicates that someone “is in command of an army”, but it is rarely used and anyway it does not mean “The Art of Leadership”. Therefore if you are looking...

Latin: Latin translation of an English phrase, latin translation, english phrase
latin translation, english phrase, ablative: Hello, Glad to help you. So, here are the translations you asked me: -“Etiam in morte, superest amor” ( In death, love survives ). -“Etiam in morte, perdurat amor (“In death, love prevails ). Please note that: -In = IN (preposition which takes...

Latin: Latin translation help... please!, latin translation, latin word
latin translation, latin word, gratias: Hello, The phrase “thank you very much “ must be rendered as follows: -“Maximas tibi gratias ago”, if YOU (TIBI in Latin) refers to a 2nd.person singular. or: -“Maximas ago vobis gratias”, if YOU (VOBIS in Latin) refers to a 2nd.person plural....