20th Century History Sitemap - Page 2 2016-09-26

Cult Compound in Waco, Texas Raided
On April 19, 1993, a fire broke out at the Branch Davidian compound during a raid by the ATF and FBI, killing 76 people, including 23 children.

War of the Worlds Radio Broadcast Causes Panic
On October 30, 1938, millions of radio listeners were shocked to hear news of an attack by Martians, which was actually just Orson Welles' adaptation of a novel.

100 Famous Women of the 20th Century
Some of the names on this list may sound familiar, others may not; however, each one of these women had an impact on the 20th century. Browse through this list and discover the fascinating stories of these 100 famous women.

The Life and Crimes of Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow
From 1932 to 1934, Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, mostly commonly known just as Bonnie and Clyde, were a young couple who went on a two-year crime rampage that included bank robberies, car theft, and murder.

Pearl Harbor
On December 7, 1941, the Japanese launched a surprise air attack on the U.S. Naval Base at Pearl Harbor, damaging or sinking 21 ships and destroying more than 188 aircraft.

History Timeline of the 20th Century
A timeline of the major, interesting, and intriguing events of the 20th century.

Mona Lisa Was Stolen
It was unbelievable -- someone stole the most famous painting in the world. Follow this two year long caper that shocked the world.

Mona Lisa Was Stolen! -- Page 2
Rumors and theories about the identity and motive of the thief spread like wildfire, but two years went by with no word about the real Mona Lisa. Page 2.

Mona Lisa Was Stolen! -- Page 3
The thief appeared in Italy two years after the theft. How and why did he really steal the Mona Lisa? Page 3.

Interesting Facts About the Channel Tunnel
How much does a ticket through the Channel Tunnel cost? How long are the tunnels? What does rabies have to do with the Channel Tunnel? Find out the answers to these questions and so many more in this list of interesting facts about the Channel Tunnel.

How the Channel Tunnel Was Built and Designed
The Channel Tunnel, often called the Chunnel, is a railway tunnel that lies underneath the water of the English Channel and connects the island of Great Britain with mainland France. The Channel Tunnel, completed in 1994, is considered one of the most amazing engineering feats of the 20th century.

The Assassination of Leon Trotsky
On August 20, 1940, Ramon Mercader slammed a mountaineering ice pick into Leon Trotsky's skull. The following day, Trotsky died of his injuries.

History of the 1940 Olympics
The 1940 Olympics were cancelled because of World War II.

Empire State Building's Mooring Mast
There was once a plan for blimps to land on the top of the Empire State Building, but did any of them actually do it?

History of the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles
Although the Soviet Union, East Germany, Cuba, and fourteen other countries boycotted the 1984 Olympic Games, China made its first appearance at an Olympic since 1932.

George Washington's Second Inaugural Address
On March 4, 1793, George Washington gave the shortest inaugural address in history.

History of the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki
Being the first Olympics that included the Soviet Union, the 1952 Olympic Games were largely a reflection of the Cold War.

History of the 1988 Olympics in Seoul
The 1988 Olympic Games saw the end to the professional vs. amateur debate as well as the reintroduction of tennis as an Olympic sport.

History of the 1976 Olympics in Montreal
The 1976 Olympic Games were marred by boycotts and drug allegations.

Terracotta Army Discovered in China
On March 29, 1974, three farmers stumbled upon one of the greatest archaeological finds of the twentieth century - the discovery of Qin Shihuangdi's ancient terracotta army.

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10 Interesting Facts About Mount Rushmore
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10 Interesting Facts About Mount Rushmore
Ten fascinating facts about Mount Rushmore, including information about the secret room, an extra-long nose, and moving one of the faces.

Jazz Singer Movie - The First Talkie
When Jazz Singer was released as a feature-length movie in 1927, it was the first movie that included dialogue and music on the filmstrip itself. Learn about this famous 'first talkie.'

History of Income Tax in the U.S.
After the ratification of the 16th Amendment to the Constitution in 1913, the U.S. federal government enacted its first, permanent personal income tax.

History of Income Tax in the U.S. - Page 2
In the 1890s, the U.S. federal government was beginning to rethink its general taxation plan. Although the federal government wanted to enact a universal income tax on the population, it had to wait for the ratification of the 16th Amendment to the Constitution to do so. Page 2.

Thanksgiving Date History and Franklin D Roosevelt
Discover the history of Thanksgiving and find out how FDR tried to change it.

Assassination Attempt on Franklin D. Roosevelt
On February 15, 1933, Giuseppe Zangara shot five bullets at President-elect Franklin D. Roosevelt at the Bayfront Park in Miama, Florida. Although all the bullets missed FDR, one did mortally wound Chicago Mayor Anton Cermak.

Nicholas II
Nicholas II was the last czar of Russia. Nicholas' inflexibility and seeming disinterest in his own people, pushed Russia into both a revolution and a civil war.

Nicholas II - Page 2
In the early morning of July 17, 1918, Nicholas II and his family were woken from their sleep and taken into small room where they were murdered. Page 2.

Soviets Change the Calendar
Although Lenin accepted the Gregorian calendar in the Soviet Union in 1918, the Soviets revamped the entire calendar again 1929, creating a Soviet revolutionary calendar that had five-day weeks. Learn more about the history of the calendar and the Soviet calendar reforms.

Kurt Gerstein - A German Spy in the SS
Kurt Gerstein didn't agree with Nazi beliefs and yet he joined the SS and became a witness to the mass killing of Jews. Find out more about this German spy in the SS.

The Bataan Death March
The forced march of American and Filipino prisoners of war by the Japanese starting on April 9, 1942 resulted in as many as 10,000 deaths.

The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill
At 12:04 a.m. on March 24, 1989, the oil supertanker Exxon Valdez hit the submerged Bligh Reef in Alaska, tearing open eight of its cargo tanks. Massive amounts of oil then spilled out, severely damaging the ecosystem of Prince William Sound. Learn more about the Exxon Valdez accident, the spill, the attempts at clean-up, and the major environmental disaster.

The Sinking of the RMS Titanic (1912)
On the night of April 14, 1912, the luxurious ocean liner Titanic hit an iceberg. Just over two hours later, the Titanic sank, losing 1,517 lives.

Kristallnacht - The Night of Broken Glass
On the night of November 9-10, 1938, a progrom known as Kristallnacht rampaged, with synagogues burned, shops destroyed, and Jews beaten.

Montgomery Bus Boycott
The Montgomery Bus Boycott, which challenged segregation on buses, was led by Martin Luther King and began the Civil Rights Movement.

Martin Luther King Jr.
Reverend Martin Luther King Jr., the leader of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, introduced the concept of nonviolence into the fight for equal rights for African Americans. He led the Montgomery Bus Boycott and then brought the struggle into the national arena.

Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks was on her way home from work on December 1, 1955 when the bus driver asked her to give up her seat for a new white passenger. Rosa Parks refused. Rosa Parks' refusal to give up her seat sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott and is considered the beginning of the modern Civil Rights Movement.

Yitzhak Rabin Assassination
On November 4, 1995, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was shot and killed by Jewish radical Yigal Amir at the end of a peace rally in Tel Aviv.

Laika the Dog - First Animal in Outer Space, 1957
Laika became the very first living creature to enter orbit after being launched on board the Soviet's Sputnik 2 on November 3, 1957.

"Dewey Defeats Truman" - The Famously Mistaken Headline
The story behind the wrong newspaper headline about the 1948 U.S. Presidential election, including the history of Harry Truman's presidency and his campaign.

Amelia Earhart
Amelia Earhart was the first woman to ever fly across the Atlantic Ocean and then also became the first woman to fly solo across it. Her fate remains one of the century's greatest mysteries after she disappeared in 1937 while trying to become the first woman to fly around the world.

Howard Hughes
Howard Hughes was a businessman, a movie producer, and an aviator; however, he is perhaps best remembered for spending his later years as an eccentric, reclusive billionaire.

The Balfour Declaration, 1917 (History and Full Text)
The history and complete text of the 1917 Balfour Declaration, which declared that the British favored a Jewish homeland in Palestine.

The Star Spangled Banner Becomes the National Anthem of the United States
On March 3, 1931, U.S. President Herbert Hoover signed an act that officially made

Holocaust Books for Children
An overview of several children's books about the Holocaust.

2000 Presidential Election - Unclear Winner in U.S. Presidential Election
Although some thought the 2000 presidential election between Al Gore (Democrat) and George W. Bush (Republican) would be close, no one imagined that it would be that close.

World War II Japanese Soldier Lt. Hiroo Onoda
Unaware that World War II had ended, Lt. Hiroo Onoda of the Japanese Army spent 29 years hiding on remote Philippine island Lubang.

Lt. Hiroo Onoda - WWII Survivor 30 Years in Hiding
Unaware that World War II had ended, Lt. Hiroo Onoda of the Japanese army spent 30 years hiding on the remote Philippine island of Lubang. After years of living in a jungle surviving on coconuts and bananas, Onoda finally surrendered in 1974. Page 2.

The U.S. Presidents - List
A list of the U.S. presidents, starting with George Washington (1789-1797), organized chronologically.

Auschwitz Facts
Thirty facts that help you learn about Auschwitz, the largest and deadliest Nazi concentration and death camp.

Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Holocaust Museum in New York
The Museum of Jewish Heritage, located in Manhattan's Battery Park in New York, is a fantastic museum dedicated to the Holocaust. Find out how to plan your visit and what you will find inside the museum.

Chunnel Timeline - A Timeline of the Building of the Chunnel
The idea for a tunnel under the sea to connect France and the United Kingdom goes back all the way to 1802. Discover how the idea for the Chunnel evolved.

Warsaw Ghetto Uprising
Beginning on April 19, 1943 and lasting for 27 days, the Jews remaining in the Warsaw Ghetto fought back against the Nazis. With limited weapons, they held off the Nazis for longer than some countries had. Learn more about the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, from the establishment of the ghetto to the last residents deported.

Holocaust Timeline - 1939 to Present
The plan for the Final Solution morphed from guns to gas chambers. Follow its evolution in this section of the Holocaust Timeline.

The New England Holocaust Memorial in Boston
The New England Holocaust Memorial, located just off the Freedom Trail in Boston, consists mainly of six, tall pillars of glass. The memorial is definitely worth a visit.

Warsaw Ghetto
For 2 1/2 years, the Warsaw Ghetto held 400,000 Jews in cramped, squalid conditions during the Holocaust. It was destroyed when the Nazis razed it to end the uprising.

The Holocaust Museum in Washington DC
The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM), located in Washington DC, is a wonderful museum and definitely worth a visit. Learn more about the museum and how best to plan your trip.

The History of the Peace Symbol
The peace symbol, the circle with three lines within it, was originally designed in 1958 by British artist Gerald Holtom. Learn more about the history of the peace symbol.

Wannsee Conference
On January 20, 1942, fifteen men joined together in Wannsee, Germany to plan the implementation of the

Treblinka Death Camp
From July 23, 1942 to October 1943, an estimated 870,000 people were killed at the Nazi death camp Treblinka in northern Poland.

Stalin Joins the Allies During World War II
After Nazi Germany's invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941, Stalin sought help by joining with the Allies. Learn more about the relationship between Stalin and the West during World War II.

Stalin's Death
After 26 years of having been dictator of the Soviet Union, Stalin died on March 5, 1953. Find out more about his plans for another purge, his death, and his embalming.

Joseph Stalin's Cult of Personality
Since many of the Soviet public didn't know about Stalin's murderous policies, they adored him. Stalin built upon this adoration and promoted himself to nearly god-like status in the minds of many Soviet citizens. Find out how Stalin created this cult of personality. Page 7.

Stalin's Great Terror - Joseph Stalin Biography
In 1934, Stalin discovered that there were party leaders who were starting to criticize his policies. Unwilling to tolerate opposition, Stalin began a massive purge of the political party, killing anyone and everyone who might have disagreed with him. Find out more about the Great Terror. Page 9.

Stalin and Hitler
Stalin didn't want to fight Nazi Germany; instead, he signed a pact with Hitler agreeing to peace. That didn't stop Hitler from attacking the Soviet Union in 1941. Find out more about the pact and the attack.

Stalin and the Cold War - Joseph Stalin Biography
After the end of World War II, tensions between the Soviet Union and the United States escalated to the point there was a Cold War. Stalin often taunted the West, trying to get territory or goals without actually coming to a physical war. Find out more about Stalin's actions during the Cold War. Page 12.

Stalin's Legacy
Stalin's legacy was complex since he had paradoxically inspired great love and great terror. Find out how the Soviet people handled the news when they found out about the atrocities Stalin committed.

Stalin and the 1917 Russian Revolution
Stalin actually missed the February 1917 Russian Revolution, but made it back to Russia in time to help orchestrate the October Russian Revolution of 1917 with Lenin.

Stalin vs. Trotsky - Joseph Stalin Biography
After Lenin's death in 1924, Leon Trotsky and Joseph Stalin both vied to be the new leader of the Soviet Union. Unfortunately for Trotsky, Stalin had spent his years creating a strong support base. Find out what happened. Page 5.

Stalin's Five Year Plans - Joseph Stalin Biography
No one was prepared for the brutality that accompanied Stalin's first Five Year Plan, which began in 1928. In an attempt to reorganize industry and agriculture, Stalin's cruel tactics killed millions of his own people. Page 6.

Profile of Joseph Stalin's Wife Nadya
Joseph Stalin married Nadezhda (Nadya) Alliluyeva in 1919 and the couple went on to have two children. Yet living with Stalin was difficult. Find out what eventually happened to Nadya. Page 8.

Stalin as a Young Revolutionary
Joseph Stalin left seminary to become a revolutionary. Arrested and exiled seven times, Stalin rose in the ranks of the Bolsheviks and helped orchestrate the Russian Revolution of 1917.

Stalin's Childhood - Joseph Stalin Biography
Even dictators are born as babies, have mothers and fathers, and grow up with friends and ambitions. Find out more about Joseph Stalin's family and his early life.

Biography of Joseph Stalin
As the dictator of the Soviet Union from 1927 to 1953, Joseph Stalin cultivated a Communist regime that was as distrustful of its own people as it was the West.

Andy Warhol, Iconic Pop Artist
One of the most important artists of pop art, which became extremely popular in the second half of the twentieth century. Though he is best remembered for his paintings of Campbell's soup cans, he also created hundreds of other works including commercial advertisements and films.

Why Is Roe v. Wade So Important?
In 1973, the U.S. Supreme Court decided in a vote of 7 to 2 in favor of a woman's right to seek an abortion in the landmark Roe v. Wade decision. Find out where and how this court case began as well as what happened when Roe v. Wade was heard by the Supreme Court.

Holocaust Glossary
Have you been studying the Holocaust and keep coming across unfamiliar terms? This Holocaust glossary is here to help!

About The Deadly Tangshan Earthquake
At 3:42 a.m. on July 28, 1976, a magnitude 7.8 earthquake hit the sleeping city of Tangshan, in northeastern China. The very large earthquake obliterated the city of Tangshan and killed over 240,000 people - making it the deadliest earthquake of the twentieth century.

Tangshan - The Deadliest Earthquake - Page 2
At 3:42 a.m. on July 28, 1976, a magnitude 7.8 earthquake hit the sleeping city of Tangshan, in northeastern China. The very large earthquake obliterated the city of Tangshan and killed over 240,000 people - making it the deadliest earthquake of the twentieth century. Page 2.

Timeline Of The Tet Offensive of the Vietnam War
A major turning point of the Vietnam War, on January 30, 1968, the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong staged a major offensive against South Vietnam.

Aswan High Dam
The Aswan High Dam in Egypt, which was completed on July 21, 1970, was built to control the frequent cycles of flooding and drought within Egypt.

Biography of the First Man in Space - Yuri Gagarin
On board Vostok 1, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin made history on April 12, 1961 when he became both the first person in the world to enter space and the first person to orbit the Earth.

Yuri Gagarin - Page 2
How did Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, die? Page 2.

The History of the Credit Card
Though the concept of credit has existed longer even than money, it wasn't until 1950 that the modern credit card was invented.

First Credit Card -- Part 2
Though the concept of credit has existed longer even than money, it wasn't until 1950 that the modern credit card was invented. Page 2.

The Red Baron - Part 5
On April 21, 1818, the day after he had shot down his 80th enemy aircraft, Manfred von Richthofen climbed into his bright red airplane. Page 5.

The Red Baron: Manfred von Richthofen Biography
Baron Manfred von Richthofen liked to fly in a blazing red airplane and shoot down plane after plane - 80 credited victories. He became a legend in the air.

The Red Baron - Part 2
On board a train heading for Metz, Richthofen entered the dining car, found an empty seat, and sat down. He then noticed a familiar face at another table. Richthofen introduced himself and found that he was talking to the famous fighter pilot Lieutenant Oswald Boelcke. Page 2.

The Red Baron - Part 3
Why the color red? Though several other flyers had painted different sections of their planes special colors, Richthofen noticed that it was difficult to see these during a battle. To get noticed, from the ground and from the air, Richthofen decided to paint his plane bright red. Page 3.

The Red Baron - Part 4
On June 24, 1917, it was announced that Jastas 4, 6, 10, and 11 were to join together into a large formation called Jagdgeschwader I and Richthofen was to be the commander. J.G. 1 came to be known as The Flying Circus. Page 4.

Assassination Attempt on Mussolini
On April 7, 1926, Italian Fascist leader Benito Mussolini had just given a speech in Rome when a bullet nearly ended his life. Find out more about this near miss by Violet Gibson.

Who Was Margaret Thatcher?
Margaret Thatcher, a member of the Conservative Party, became the very first female Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in 1979, making her also the first female leader of any Western country. Margaret Thatcher served three terms (from 1979 to 1990) as prime minister, making many economic changes, winning the Falklands War, and helping to end the Cold War. Learn more about this amazing woman.

Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Term and Death
President Franklin D. Roosevelt led the United States during both the Great Depression and World War II. Paralyzed from the waist down after suffering a bout of polio, Roosevelt overcame his disability and was elected president of the United States an unprecedented four times. Page 2.

The Life and Presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt
President Franklin D. Roosevelt led the United States during both the Great Depression and World War II. Paralyzed from the waist down after suffering a bout of polio, Roosevelt overcame his disability and was elected President of the United States an unprecedented four times.

Great White Shark Attacks Five Times Off Jersey Shore
In July 1916, there were five shark attacks along the Jersey Shore within just 12 days, causing a fear of great white sharks that continued for a century.

Disneyland Opens in 1955
On July 17, 1955, Disneyland opened. Children and adults alike were able to enter the magical land and leave their problems behind while they enjoyed rides and shows in Adventureland, Fantasyland, Frontierland, and Tomorrowland.

Zyklon B
Zyklon B, commonly known as hydrogen cyanide (HCN), was the poisonous gas used to kill Jews and others in gas chambers during the Holocaust.

History Quotes
A collection of history quotes made by famous or influential people of the 20th century.

Jane Goodall Biography - Chimpanzee Researcher
Jane Goodall has spent over five decades studying chimpanzees at the Gombe Stream Reserve in what is now Tanzania. She has made several important discoveries about chimpanzees and has become famous world-wide for her research and her activism. Learn more about the life of Jane Goodall.

Dian Fossey -- Gorilla Expert
Dian Fossey went into the jungle to study gorillas and ultimately became their biggest advocate, fighting against poachers and publicizing the gorillas' plight

1936 Olympic Games in Berlin, Germany
In 1936, Nazi Germany hosted both the Winter and Summer Olympic Games. Despite Nazi Germany's obvious antisemitism, no country successfully boycotted the Games. Find out more about why the attempts to boycott failed and what happened at the 1936 Olympic Games.

History of 1924 Olympic Games in Paris
The 1924 Olympic Games saw the first Olympic Village and the elimination of tennis. Find out what else made the 1924 Olympic Games special.

History of the 1906 Olympics in Athens, Greece
The plan to implement additional Olympic Games in Greece did not continue after the 1906 Games; thus the 1906 Olympics is considered unofficial.

History of the 1900 Olympics in Paris
Because of the World Exhibition, which was held at the same time, the 1900 Olympics were poorly organized and poorly publicized.

Jakob the Liar - Movie Review
The movie Jakob the Liar is about a Jewish man who must decide whether or not to keep up a pretense that has given hope to the ghetto residents.

Wedding of Lady Diana and Prince Charles
On July 29, 1981, Lady Diana Spencer married Prince Charles at St. Paul's Cathedral in London. It was the wedding of the century.

SOS - The Universal Distress Signal
After being agreed upon at the 1906 Radiotelegraphic Conference, the Morse code went into effect as the international signal for distress on July 1, 1908.

Struma -- A Ship Filled With Jewish Refugees
Attempting to escape the Nazis, 769 Jews attempted to flee to Palestine on board the Struma. But instead of finding freedom, their ship was torpedoed.

The Long Way Home - A Movie Review
This movie, the Long Way Home, continues the story of Jewish Holocaust survivors during the harrowing, yet heroic and inspirational, period of 1945 to 1948.

Josef Mengele
Dr. Josef Mengele was the notorious SS doctor that performed pseudoscientific medical experiments on twins and others at Auschwitz.

Abba Kovner and Resistance in the Vilna Ghetto
Abba Kovner led resistance fighters in both the Vilna Ghetto and in the Rudninkai Forest against the murderous Nazi enemy during the Holocaust

History of the Yellow Star
The yellow star, inscribed with the word Jude, has become a symbol of Nazi persecution. Discover the history of the badge and learn how the visual labeling of Jews led to organized persecution.

Yellow Star -- Part 2
The yellow star, inscribed with the word 'Jude'

Yellow Star -- Part 3
The yellow star, inscribed with the word 'Jude'

Voyage of the St. Louis
In 1939, 937 Jews tried to escape persecution in Germany by boarding a ship, the St. Louis, headed for Cuba. Their trip did not go as planned.

Magic Johnson
Playing 13 seasons with the Lakers, Magic Johnson was one of basketball's greatest players, ultimately leaving the game because he contracted HIV.

Lodz Ghetto - Page 2
Beginning on January 6, 1942, the residents of the Lodz Ghetto were sent to Chelmno to be gassed. The Lodz Ghetto was officially liquidated in August 1944. Page 2.

Lodz Ghetto
On February 8, 1940, the Jews of Lodz, Poland were forced to live in a very small area of the city and then sealed off from the rest of the world.

Muselmann in Nazi Concentration Camps
With glazed eyes and a zombie-like walk, a Muselmann in a Nazi concentration camp was a prisoner that had lost all hope -- and was soon to die.

History Day - How to Choose a Great Topic
The official rules say you need to choose a topic related to the theme. But what makes a History Day topic a good one rather than just okay?

Cold War Glossary
A glossary of significant and key terms related to the Cold War, the hostilities between the Soviet Union and the United States following World War II.

World War II Starts
When Germany attacked Poland on September 1, 1939, Britain and France felt they had to declare war on Germany two days later, thus starting World War II.

Madagascar Plan
The Nazis were responsible for killing millions of Jews during the Holocaust, but before that they considered forcing Jews to move to Madagascar.

1927 - 1928 Academy Awards
A look at the very first Academy Awards ceremony, held on May 16, 1929. Find out who won the very first Academy Award.

Rubik's Cube - A History of the 1980s Puzzle
The Rubik's Cube, a simple-looking cubed puzzle, has stumped millions of people around the world and become an icon of the 1980s.

Der Stuermer - The Nazi Newspaper
Circulated from 1923 until 1945, Der Stuermer was a weekly, Nazi newspaper used to spread propaganda and incite hatred.

Lech Walesa - Poland's Solidarity Leader
Despite living under the harsh Soviet regime, Lech Walesa helped organize millions of workers in Poland to get better working conditions.

John Glenn
Astronaut John Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth on February 20, 1962. But John Glenn was an amazing, accomplished man both before and after that flight as well. Learn more about John Glenn in this short biography.

Elizabeth Arden - A Biography of the Cosmetics Pioneer
Although Elizabeth Arden was a high-school dropout, she was extremely business savvy. After opening her first beauty salon, she created a line of cosmetics that were soon sold around the world. Find out more about Elizabeth Arden and how her rivalry with Helena Rubinstein spurred both women to achieve amazing things.

Balto and the Serum Relay to Nome, Alaska
In February 1925, Balto and his driver, Gunnar Kaasen, braved a blizzard to bring serum to Nome, Alaska to save the city's children from a diphtheria epidemic.

Theodore Roosevelt
Full of energy and vigor, it seemed like nothing could stop Theodore Roosevelt. He wrote books, took down trusts, battled corruption, and became the president of the United States.

World War II Memorial in Washington D.C.
After years of discussion and over half a century of waiting, the United States finally honors the Americans who helped fight World War II with a memorial.

Truman Capote - Author of In Cold Blood
Short, with a soft voice, and homosexual, Truman Capote was not easy to forget. In the limelight as much for being the author of Breakfast at Tiffany's and In Cold Blood as his lively personality, Truman Capote was a very popular celebrity in his lifetime.

We Are the World - The Story Behind the Song
The song We Are the World was recorded by 45 of the top artists to help end famine in Africa.It was so catchy that it quickly became one of the most popular songs of 1985.

Columbine Massacre - A List of Those Killed
A list of those killed during the Columbine Massacre on April 20, 1999.

Columbine Massacre - A List of Those Killed
A list of those killed during the Columbine Massacre on April 20, 1999.

Brief Biography of Sharpshooter Annie Oakley
Annie Oakley, a sharpshooter, wowed audiences of Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show with theatrical antics that showed off her amazing precision and skill. Perhaps her most famous stunt was shooting backwards while using only the reflection of a table knife as guidance. Annie Oakley was one of the most famous female performers of her time.

This Day in History
Discover what happened today or any day in history through the plethora of today in history resources available online.

Holocaust Poetry
With beauty and with sadness, poetry is a form of emotional expression, which makes this a good medium for describing the horrors of the Holocaust.

Kapos
Kapos were prisoners in the Nazi concentration camps that helped their captors brutally control the general prisoner population in exchange for privileges.

The Number of Jews Killed During the Holocaust by Country
A chart showing the number of Jews who died in each country during the Holocaust

Lebensraum
Germany's foreign policy during the Third Reich was based on expansion. Learn about the ideology behind Lebensraum

Empire State Building Trivia and Cool Facts
Ever wondered how many stairs are in the Empire State Building? Or how many windows there are? Find out the answers to these questions plus learn a lot more interesting Empire State Building facts.

Empire State Building
When the Empire State Building opened on May 1, 1931, it was the tallest building in the world. How did this gigantic icon get built? It started with a race to the sky.

Empire State Building - Page 2
How did they make the steel skeleton so high in the air? How did the riveters work on just beams? How do you get people up to a 102nd floor quickly? When was the Empire State Building finished? Page 2.

Empire State Building - Page 3
How did the builders organize everyone to get the Empire State Building built so quickly? Page 3.

The Panama Canal
After decades of work and many difficulties along the way, the Panama Canal officially opened on August 15, 1914. Find out how it was constructed.

Holocaust Timeline - 1914 to 1932
In this section of the Holocaust Timeline, follow the path that led from the German's loss of World War I.to the growth of the Nazi Party.

Holocaust Timeline - 1914 to 1932
In this section of the Holocaust Timeline, follow the path that led from the German's loss of World War I.to the growth of the Nazi Party.

Bhopal, India Poison Gas Leak Disaster, 1984
During the night of December 2-3, 1984, poisonous gas from the Union Carbide pesticide plant leaked into Bhopal, India, killing an estimated 3,000 to 8,000 people.

WWI Timeline - 1914 to 1918
World War I was sparked by the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in 1914. Find out what happened after this momentous event in this WWI timeline.

Mary McLeod Bethune
Mary McLeod Bethune was a famous black spokesperson for education, equal rights, civil rights, and women's rights during the first half of the 20th century.

Nelson Mandela - A Biography
Nelson Mandela, an anti-apartheid activist, spent 27 years in prison. Only four years after his release, Mandela became South Africa's first black president.

The Scopes Trial
On July 10, 1925, the Scopes Trial began, featuring two famous lawyers battling to decide whether creationism and evolution should be taught in schools.

Muhammad Ali Becomes World Heavyweight Champion
On February 25, 1964, Muhammad Ali, then still known as Cassius Clay, fought Charles Sonny Liston for the world heavyweight title in Miami, Florida.

Man Laying Down at the New York Docks During the Great Depression
A man laying down at the New York docks during the Great Depression.

View of a Hooverville During the Great Depression
A view of a migrant worker's camp, known as a Hooverville during the Great Depression.

Breadlines in New York City During the Great Depression
Breadline in New York City during the Great Depression.

A Young Girl Standing Next to an Outdoor Stove During the Great Depression
A young girl standing next to an outdoor stove during the Great Depression.

A Migrant Worker Standing Next to His Lean-To During the Great Depression
A migrant worker standing next to his lean to, which is basically a place for him to sleep, during the Great Depression.

18-Year-Old Mother From Oklahoma Now a Migrant Worker in California
An 18-year-old mother and her young child sit at the entrance of their temporary shelter in California during the Great Depression.

Arkansas Squatter Near Bakersfield, California During the Great Depression
A temporary housing structure built by a migrant worker near Bakersfield, California during the Great Depression.

Packed and Ready for the Long Trip to California During the Great Depression
A woman and her young child sitting next to their over-filled car, ready to head to California during the Great Depression.

Migrants Living Out of Their Car During the Great Depression
A migrant and his family living out of their car as they try to find work during the Great Depression.

Temporary Housing for Migrant Workers During the Great Depression
A picture of a mother and her children standing next to their temporary shelter during the Great Depression.

Okies Driving to California During the Great Depression
A close-up picture of two

A Homeless Tenant-Farmer Family Walking Along a Road During the Great Depression
A homeless tenent-farmer family walking along a road during the Great Depression.

Migrant Worker Walking Alone on a California Highway During the Great Depression
A migrant worker walking along the a California highway during the Great Depression.

A Man Standing in a Dust Storm During the Great Depresssion
A man standing in a dust storm, holding his hat, during the Great Depresssion.

A Farm Foreclosure Sale During the Great Depression
A picture of a farm foreclosure sale during the Great Depression.

Dust Storm in Oklahoma During the Great Depression
A huge Dust Storm hits Oklahoma during the Great Depression.

Wife and Children of a Sharecropper During the Great Depression
A picture of a wife and children of a sharecropper living in Arkansas during the Great Depression.

Two Children Sitting on a Porch in Arkansas During the Great Depression
Two young boys at a rehabilitation center in Arkansas during the Great Depression.

A Young Girl Making Supper During the Great Depression
A young girl making supper during the Great Depression.

Christmas Dinner During the Great Depression
A man and his children eating Christmas dinner together during the Great Depression.

The Most Famous Great Depression Picture - Migrant Mother
The most famous picture taken during the Great Depression, Migrant Mother, by Dorothea Lange.

A One-Room Schoolhouse During the Great Depression
A one-room schoolhouse in Arkansas during the Great Depression.

Holocaust Timeline - 1933 to 1938
The Nazis spent the pre-war years removing Jews from German society and preparing for war. Follow the path from the first concentration camp to WWII.

How to Write a History Paper
Have you been assigned to write a history paper and don't know where to start? Let this guide to writing history papers will help.

Red Baron's Kills
The Red Baron, the famous flying ace of World War I, is credited with shooting down 80 different aircraft. Here is a list that includes the dates and locations of those kills.

History Dr. Spock's The Common Book of Baby and Child Care
Dr. Spock's book of baby care completely changed the way parents raise their children and is one of the best-selling non-fiction books of all time.

Gypsies During the Holocaust Timeline
Follow the path of persecution to mass slaughter in this timeline of what happened to the Gypsies during the Third Reich.

A List of the Olympic Games
A year-by-year overview of all the modern Olympic Games.

History of the 1920 Olympics in Antwerp
The first Olympic Games held after World War I, the 1920 Olympics lacked both building materials and spectators.

History of the 1948 Olympic Games in London
After the end of World War II, the Olympics resumed in 1948 in London. Although athletes were asked to bring their own food, the 1948 Olympics were extremely popular.

History of the 1960 Olympics in Rome, Italy
The 1960 Olympic Games were held in Rome and featured the star athletes Abebe Bikila (who ran and won the marathon while barefoot) and Cassius Clay (better known as Muhammad Ali).

Dunkirk Evacuation
From May 26 to June 4, 1940, the British sent both military and civilian ships to evacuate the British Army and other Allied troops from Dunkirk.

Booker T. Washington Biography
Despite being born a slave, Booker T. Washington went on to found the Tuskegee Institute and became one of the most famous African Americans of his time.

The Rainbow Warrior Bombing
On July 10, 1985, Greenpeace's flagship Rainbow Warrior was sunk by French secret agents while it was berthed in Auckland, New Zealand.

First Peanuts Cartoon Strip
The very first Peanuts comic strip, written by Charles M. Schulz, appeared in seven newspapers on October 2, 1950.

Wiley Post and Will Rogers Killed in Plane Crash
On August 15, 1935, Wiley Post and Will Rogers were killed in a plane crash. Traveling through Alaska, their engine stalled and the plane nose-dived.

Mt St Helens 1980 Eruption
On May 18, 1980, Mt. St. Helens erupted, leaving in its wake death and destruction.

Marilyn Monroe Sings Happy Birthday to JFK
On May 19, 1962, Marilyn Monroe sang a sultry, provocative rendition of Happy Birthday to celebrate President John F. Kennedy's 45th birthday.

Skylab
Skylab, launched unmanned on May 14, 1973, was America's first space station.

Churchill's "Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat" Speech
Read the full transcript of Prime Minister Winston Churchill's call-to-arm speech known as Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat, given in the House of Commons on May 13, 1940.

Iron Curtain Speech by Winston Churchill
On March 5, 1946, Winston Churchill spoke at a small college in Fulton, Missouri. This famous speech, officially called The Sinews of Peace but more commonly called the Iron Curtain speech, described the split of Europe into democratic and Communist spheres.

Dr. Charles Drew
Dr. Charles Drew was a famous African-American surgeon responsible for creating the first blood banks.

Bigfoot - The First Monster Truck
In April 1981, Bob Chandler made automotive history when he took his huge Ford F-250 named Bigfoot over two junk cars, making Bigfoot the first monster truck.

Milli Vanilli Lip-Synch Scandal
The pop-music duo Milli Vanilli were extremely popular, selling 14 million albums. Then it was revealed that the lead singers had really lip-synched.

Murder of Emmett Till
On August 28, 1955, two white men abducted young Emmett Till, beat him, shot him, and dumped his body in the river. Everyone knew who did it and yet the crime went unpunished.

The Titanic - Timeline Of Its First and Only Voyage
A timeline of the fateful voyage of the RMS Titanic, including dates about the Titanic's construction and its sinking in 1912.

New Coke
On April 23, 1985, the Coca Cola Company announced that it was going to change the formula of their most popular soda. The public was outraged at the idea of New Coke.

The Great Gatsby - Published April 10, 1925
F. Scott Fitzgerald's masterpiece, The Great Gatsby, was first published on April 10, 1925. It did NOT have a successful start.

The First McDonald's
The very first of Ray Kroc's McDonald's opened on April 15, 1955 in Des Plaines, Illinois.

The Youngest Presidents in U.S. History - List
A list of the U.S. Presidents from the youngest when they took office (number 1 was Theodore Roosevelt) to the oldest

Teddy Roosevelt Simplifies Spelling
In 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt directed the Government Printing Office to change the spelling of 300 specific words in all executive correspondence. In so doing, Roosevelt was supporting a new movement of simplified spelling. However, many were very unhappy with this change.

History of Sliced Bread
We have all heard, and perhaps even personally used, the phrase, the greatest thing since sliced bread! Yet, when was sliced bread invented and why was it so amazing? Find out more about the history of sliced bread.

U.S. President William McKinley Assassinated, 1901
At 4:07 p.m. on September 6, 1901, Leon Czolgosz shot U.S. President William McKinley twice. Although many expected the President to recover after having emergency surgery, President McKinley died at 2:15 a.m. on September 14, 1901 from gangrene.

The Gardner Heist
On March 18, 1990, two thieves entered the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and stole 13 pieces of art that are worth approximately $500 million.

The Assassination of Malcolm X
On February 21, 1965, Malcolm X was shot and killed at a meeting in the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem. Who killed Malcolm X?

The Firebombing of Dresden
The Firebombing of Dresden (February 13-14, 1945) only lasted 15 hours and yet destroyed much of this historic, beautiful city.

Birth of a Nation
Birth of a Nation (1915), directed and produced by D.W. Griffith, was one of the most influential and controversial movies of all time.

Billie Holiday
Billie Holiday (1915-1959) was one of the greatest jazz singers of all time. Her light and untrained voice was amazing, but her hard early life haunted her.

Madam C.J. Walker
Madam C.J. Walker was truly a remarkable woman. She started out life as a child of slaves, was orphaned at age 7, married at age 14, a mother by age 17, and then a widow by age 20. She then spent 18 years as a laundress before starting her own hair-care business that grew exponentially, ultimately making her the first female, self-made millionaire.

Princess Diana - Biography
Diana, Princess of Wales was called the People's Princess, her life like a fairytale until the realities were exposed. Her death shocked the world.

Eleanor Roosevelt - Biography
Eleanor Roosevelt was a beloved figure of the 20th century. She fought tirelessly for the rights of the underprivileged throughout her lifetime, especially during her tenure as First Lady of the United States and while serving as a delegate to the United Nations.

The First Playboy Magazine, December 1953
The first issue of Playboy Magazine, which featured Marilyn Monroe, was published in December 1953..

Raoul Wallenberg
Raoul Wallenberg, a businessman turned Swedish diplomat, was one of the most successful rescuers during the Holocaust, rescuing an estimated 30,000 to 100,000 Hungarian Jews.

First Transcontinental Telephone Call
On January 25, 1915, Alexander Graham Bell made the very first transcontinental telephone call when he called from New York to San Francisco.

Murders of Czar Nicholas II of Russia and His Family
At 2:00 am on the morning of July 17, 1918, Czar Nicholas II, his wife, and their five children were taken to a small room downstairs and brutally murdered. Find out how and why.

Harry Houdini - The Great Escape Artist
Learn more about the life of Harry Houdini, the great escape artist and one of the most famous magicians in history.

Harry Houdini
What were Houdini's most famous escapes? What films did Houdini appear in? Why did many Spiritualists hate Houdini? How did Houdini die? Find out the answers to these questions and more in the biography of Harry Houdini. Page 2.

Prehistoric Art Found in the Caves of Lascaux
Found by four boys and their dog, the Lascaux cave complex holds 2,000 images of prehistoric art, dated from the Upper Paleolithic era.

Heinrich Himmler
Heinrich Himmler, leader of the dreaded SS in Nazi Germany, was a bespectacled bureaucrat who organized the Holocaust. Learn more about the man who killed millions.

Blog


A History of the Boxer Rebellion (1900)
In 1900, a group known as the Boxers murdered thousands of foreigners, especially missionaries, in an attempt to rid China of all foreign influence.

Princess Elizabeth Becomes Queen at Age 25
After suffering from lung cancer for several years, King George VI died in his sleep on February 6, 1952 at age 56. Upon his death, his oldest daughter, Princess Elizabeth, became queen. Elizabeth was 25 years old.

Vietnam War Timeline
A timeline from 1858 to 1982 that looks at the origins, major events, and aftermath of the Vietnam War.

Great Depression - Photography Collection
Links to a large compilation of pictures of dust storms, farm foreclosures, migrant workers, unemployed, breadlines, soup kitchens, etc.

History of the Olympics - Creating the Modern Games
After 1500 years with no Olympics, the modern Olympic Games were established. Learn how and why the Games began again.

Russian Revolution Timeline
Follow the events of the Russian Revolution of 1917 as they unfolded in this timeline of the Russian Revolution.

Poem by Bonnie Parker Called the Story of Suicide Sal
Bonnie Parker wrote two poems while she and Clyde Barrow were on the run from the law. This poem, the Story of Suicide Sal, was the first of the two. It was written by Bonnie while she was held in the Kaufman jail in spring 1932. The poem was published in newspapers after it was found during the raid on Bonnie and Clyde's hideout in Joplin, Missouri on April 13, 1933.

Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster, 1986
On April 26th, 1986, reactor four at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded, releasing massive amounts of radiation into the environment.

The Eichmann Trial
After being found and captured in Argentina, Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann, known as the architect of the Final Solution, was put on trial in Israel in 1961. Eichmann was found guilty and sentenced to death. At midnight between May 31 and June 1, 1962, Eichmann was executed by hanging. Learn more about the capture of Eichmann and the Eichmann Trial.

LEGO Toy Bricks First Introduced (1958)
For over half a century, the small, plastic bricks known as LEGO have sparked the imagination of children around the world. Discover the history of LEGO toys.

Nobel Prize History - How the First Nobel Prizes Were Awarded
A newspaper mistakenly ran an obituary for Alfred Nobel which called him the merchant of death. Not wanting to go down in history with such a horrible epitaph, Nobel created a will that shocked his relatives but established the Nobel Prizes.

Mahatma Gandhi
Mahatma Gandhi, the father of the Indian independence movement, spent 20 years in South Africa working to fight discrimination and then returned to India.He spent his remaining years working diligently to both remove British rule from India as well as to better the lives of India's poorest classes.

Biography of Mahatma Gandhi - Life in South Africa
Gandhi spent twenty years in South Africa against discrimination. It was there that Gandhi transformed from a shy and quiet man into a potent leader. Page 2.

Biography of Mahatma Gandhi - Part 3: Back to India
In 1915, Gandhi finally traveled back to India after having spent twenty years in South Africa. Although he was eager to fight discrimination, Gandhi spent his first year back traveling through India, learning about the people and their troubles. Page 3.

Gandhi - Part 4
On March 12, 1930, Gandhi began his March to the Sea to protest the British tax on salt. Page 4.

World War II Timeline - 20th Century History
World War II (WWII) was a long and bloody war that lasted for six years. Officially beginning on September 1, 1939 when Germany invaded Poland, World War II lasted until both the Germans and the Japanese had surrendered to the Allies in 1945. Find out what happened in this timeline of World War II.

Anne Frank Goes Into Hiding, 1942
Anne Frank and her family went into hiding on July 6, 1942, which was ten days earlier than they had planned.

History of Bubble Gum and Chewing Gum
Chewing gum has a history that spans as far back as the ancient Greeks; however, bubble gum, a type of chewing gum that allows the chewer to make bubbles, has a much more recent history. Find out who invented bubble gum and why it has that pink color.

Clyde Barrow's Letter to Henry Ford
On April 10, 1934, Clyde Barrow wrote a letter to Henry Ford thanking him for the wonderful cars he builds. Learn more about the letter and why cars were so important to Clyde.

Major Battles of World War II
There were numerous battles in World War II. Some of these battles lasted only days while others took months or years. Some of the battles were notable for the material losses such as tanks or aircraft carriers while others were notable for the number of human losses. Although this is not a comprehensive list of all battes of WWII, it is a list of the major battles of World War II.

Pictures of the Attack on Pearl Harbor, 1941
On the morning of December 7, 1941, Japanese forces attacked the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The surprise attack destroyed much of the United States' fleet, especially the battleships. This collection of pictures of Pearl Harbor includes pictures of planes caught on the ground, battleships burning and sinking, explosions, and bomb damage.

Quotes by Albert Einstein
A collection of quotes by Albert Einstein, the most famous scientist of the twentieth century.

World War II - Death Marches From Concentration Camps
As World War II drew to a close, the Nazis evacuated their concentration camps and forced the prisoners on long marches - death marches.

Death Marches - Page 2
As World War II drew to a close, the Nazis evacuated their conentration camps and forced the prisoners on long marches - death marches. Page 2.

Jackie Kennedy
Jackie Kennedy, as wife of John F. Kennedy, was the First Lady of the United States from 1961 to 1963. She is remembered for her style, grace, and efforts to restore the White House.

Betty Friedan Publishes The Feminine Mystique
In 1963, Betty Friedan's book, The Feminine Mystique, challenged the 1950s image of the happy, suburban housewife.

Bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 Over Lockerbie
On December 21, 1988, Pan Am Flight 103 exploded over Lockerbie, Scotland, killing all 259 people on board as well as 11 on the ground. Though it was almost immediately evident that a bomb had caused the disaster, it took more than eleven years to bring anyone to trial. What happened to the plane? Why would someone plant a bomb on Flight 103? Why did it take eleven years to have a trial?

Iqbal Masih, Pakistani Martyr - Biography
Iqbal Masih was a young Pakistani boy who was forced into bonded labor at age four. After being freed at age ten, Iqbal became an activist against bonded child labor. He became a martyr for his cause when he was murdered at age 12.

Iqbal Masih - Page 2
Iqbal Masih was a young Pakastani boy who was forced into bonded labor at age four. After being freed at age ten, Iqbal became an activist against bonded child labor. He became a martyr for his cause when he was murdered at age 12. Page 2.

Elvis Presley - Biography
The life of the 20th century cultural icon, sexy singer and charismatic actor who made 33 movies, and sold more than a billion records. Page 1 of 2.

Elvis Presley - Page 2
The biography of one of the biggest music legends in history. Read more about the life of Elvis Presley. Page 2.

History Facts and Trivia from the 20th Century
A collection of interesting facts and trivia about 20th century history.

History Facts - Page 2
Did you know that Einstein designed a refrigerator? Or that tug-of-war used to be an Olympic event? Check out this collection of interesting historical facts. Page 2.

History Facts - Page 3
A collection of interesting facts and trivia about 20th century history. Page 3.

President John F. Kennedy Gives Man on the Moon Speech
On May 25, 1961, U.S. President John F. Kennedy stood in front of a joint session of Congress and stated that the United States should set as a goal the 'landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth' by the end of the decade.

President John F. Kennedy's Man on the Moon Speech - Part 2
On May 25, 1961, U.S. President John F. Kennedy stood in front of a joint session of Congress and stated that the United States should set as a goal the 'landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth' by the end of the decade. Page 2.

President John F. Kennedy's Man on the Moon Speech - Part 3
On May 25, 1961, U.S. President John F. Kennedy stood in front of a joint session of Congress and stated that the United States should set as a goal the 'landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth' by the end of the decade. Page 3.

President John F. Kennedy's Man on the Moon Speech - Part 4
On May 25, 1961, U.S. President John F. Kennedy stood in front of a joint session of Congress and stated that the United States should set as a goal the 'landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth' by the end of the decade. Page 4.

President John F. Kennedy's Man on the Moon Speech - Part 5
On May 25, 1961, U.S. President John F. Kennedy stood in front of a joint session of Congress and stated that the United States should set as a goal the 'landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth' by the end of the decade. Page 5.

Hitler - Hitler's Last Will
In Hitler's last will, written a day before his death, he planned the future for his body and possessions.

Pictures of Events and People From the 20th Century
A large compilation of pictures of fascinating people and important events of the twentieth century, including Franklin D. Roosevelt, the Holocaust, the Vietnam War, and World War I.

History of the Olympics - 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin
Although there was much discussion about boycotting the 1936 Olympic Games because they were being held in Nazi Germany, the Olympics were held as scheduled with Jesse Owens being the star athlete.

A Holocaust Survivor's Story - Introduction
Charlotte Guthmann Opfermann offers a personal account of her life within the Theresienstadt Ghetto, starting with her childhood in Germany. Page 1 of 4.

Interview with a Survivor -- Part 2
Charlotte's personal account of life within the Theresienstadt Ghetto. Page 2.

Interview with a Survivor -- Part 3
Charlotte's personal account of life within the Theresienstadt Ghetto. Page 3.

Interview with a Survivor -- Part 4
Charlotte's personal account of life within the Theresienstadt Ghetto. Page 4.

Mass Murder at Babi Yar Ravine
In retaliation for explosions in downtown Kiev, the Nazis created a place of mass murder in the ravine named Babi Yar.

Babi Yar -- Page 2
As the Red Army was approaching, the Nazis attempted to destroy the evidence of their mass murders by burning the bodies. Page 2.

Babi Yar -- Page 3
The prisoners that were forced to destroy the evidence at Babi Yar planned to escape before they too were killed. Learn more about their plan, how the plan was nearly foiled, and their ultimate escape. Page 3.

History of the Olympics - 1972 Olympic Games in Munich
The 1972 Olympic Games will probably be best remembered for the murder of eleven Israeli Olympians.

Woodrow Wilson's 14 Points Speech
On January 8, 1918, President Woodrow Wilson gave a speech to Congress in which he detailed 14 points that Wilson hoped would not only end World War I, but also prevent another such total war from occurring.

Academy Awards: Interesting Facts and Trivia
Who received the very first Oscar? What was the only X-rated film to win an Academy Award? Find out the answers to those and more in first of two pages.

The Oscars - Academy Awards Trivia and Fun Facts
The Oscars - Academy Awards Trivia and Fun Facts. Page 2.

Hidden Children of the Holocaust
Some children during the Holocaust hid themselves physically. The most famous example of this is Anne Frank, where children physically hid in an annex, attic, cabinet, etc. Page 2.

Hidden Children - Part 3
Some Jewish children during the Holocaust lived within society, but hid their Jewish identity. Page 3.

Hidden Children - Part 4
After the war, hidden children had to cope with the realities of lost families. Page 4.

Hidden Children of the Holocaust - Physical Hiding
After having been forced to wear the yellow badge, forced out of school, taunted and attacked by others their age, disallowed from parks and other public places, Jewish children felt the persecution. Some Jewish children went into hiding to escape the increasing persecution and, most importantly, the deportations. Find out more about hidden children.

The First Crossword Puzzle
On December 12, 1913, the very first crossword puzzle, created by Arthur Wynne, was published in the New York World newspaper.

History Day - Primary and Secondary Sources
Many students have trouble determining if a source is a primary source or a secondary source. Check out these tips to help you decide.

Interesting Olympic Facts
Ever wondered what the five rings on the Olympic flag symbolize? What do gymnasiums have to do with being naked? Find out the answers to these questions plus learn a lot more interesting Olympic facts.

Interesting Olympic Facts
Have you ever wondered why a marathon is 26 miles long? Or women were first allowed to participate in the Olympic Games? Check out this list of interesting Olympics facts. Page 2.

Segregation Ruled Illegal (Brown v. Board of Ed), 1954
On May 17, 1954, the landmark United States Supreme Court decision of Brown v. Board of Education overturned the Plessy v. Ferguson decision by ruling that segregation was inherently unequal.

Sending Children by Parcel Post - A True Story
It's never easy traveling with children and often it can be expensive. In the early 1900s, some people decided cut costs by mailing their children via parcel

The Battle of Britain, 1940 - 1941
Intense air battle between the Germans and the British over Great Britain's airspace-a decisive victory for the British,Germany's first World War II defeat.

Gypsies and the Holocaust - Forgotten Victims
The Gypsies of Europe were registered, sterilized, ghettoized, and then deported to concentration and death camps by the Nazis. Approximately 250,000 to 500,000 Gypsies were murdered during the Holocaust - an event they call the Porajmos.

Gypsies and the Holocaust -- Part 2
The Gypsies of Europe were registered, sterilized, ghettoized, and then deported to concentration and death camps by the Nazis. Approximately 250,000 to 500,000 Gypsies were murdered during the Holocaust - an event they call the Porajmos. Page 2.

1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City Overview
The 1968 Olympic Games were very exciting. The Olympics were both disrupted by protests and surprised by new techniques in the high jump and long jump.

Sobibor Death Camp, 1942 - Introduction
In the Sobibor Death Camp, located in Poland, at least 250,000 prisoners were murdered in the 18 months it operated during World War II. Only 48 survived.

Sobibor - Part 2
The Sobibor Death Camp, located in Sobibor, Poland, was the second of three death camps to be established as part of Aktion Reinhard. Within the Sobibor Death Camp, in operation for only eighteen months, at least 250,000 men, women, and children were murdered. Only 48 Sobibor prisoners survived the war. Page 2.

Sobibor - Part 3
The Sobibor Death Camp, located in Sobibor, Poland, was the second of three death camps to be established as part of Aktion Reinhard. Within the Sobibor Death Camp, in operation for only eighteen months, at least 250,000 men, women, and children were murdered. Only 48 Sobibor prisoners survived the war. Page 3.

A Short History of the American Red Cross
A short history of the American Red Cross, the only congressionally mandated organization to provide aid to victims of disaster.

The Sobibor Revolt - Jew Retaliation During Holocaust
Although the difficulties seemed insurmountable and success improbable, the Jews of the Sobibor death camp attempted a revolt. They made a plan and attacked their captors, but axes and knives were little match for the SS's machine guns. How and why did the prisoners of Sobibor come to the decision to revolt?

Sobibor Revolt - Part 2
Although the difficulties seemed insurmountable and success improbable, the Jews of the Sobibor death camp attempted a revolt. They made a plan and attacked their captors, but axes and knives were little match for the SS's machine guns. How and why did the prisoners of Sobibor come to the decision to revolt? Page 2.

Sobibor Revolt - Part 3
Although the difficulties seemed insurmountable and success improbable, the Jews of the Sobibor death camp attempted a revolt. They made a plan and attacked their captors, but axes and knives were little match for the SS's machine guns. How and why did the prisoners of Sobibor come to the decision to revolt? Page 3.

Sobibor Revolt - Part 4
Although the difficulties seemed insurmountable and success improbable, the Jews of the Sobibor death camp attempted a revolt. They made a plan and attacked their captors, but axes and knives were little match for the SS's machine guns. How and why did the prisoners of Sobibor come to the decision to revolt? Page 4.

Sobibor Revolt - Part 5
Although the difficulties seemed insurmountable and success improbable, the Jews of the Sobibor death camp attempted a revolt. They made a plan and attacked their captors, but axes and knives were little match for the SS's machine guns. How and why did the prisoners of Sobibor come to the decision to revolt? Page 5.

Great Britain History: Winston Churchill's Second Term
Having led Great Britain in World War II, Winston Churchill suffered a surprising electoral defeat in 1945. Six years later, when the Labour Party lost to the Conservatives in the 1951 election, Winston Churchill once again became Prime Minister.

1965 - U.S. Sends Troops to Vietnam
On March 8, 1965, 3,500 U.S. Marines land near Da Nang in South Vietnam; they are the first U.S. troops arrive in Vietnam.

History of the Olympics - 1896 Olympic Games in Athens
The first modern Olympic Games were held in 1896 in Athens, Greece. Learn more about the first Olympic athletes and the events they competed in.

Y2K Bug - A Computer Glitch That Scared the World
The Y2K (Year 2000) problem existed because most dates in computers were programmed to automatically assume the date began with 19 as in 1977. But when the date was to turn from December 31, 1999 to January 1, 2000, it was prophesied that computers would be so confused that they would shut down completely. Find out more about the Y2K bug that scared the world.

Babe Ruth Sets Home Run Record (1927)
On September 30, 1927, in the second-to-last game of the season, Babe Ruth hit his 60th home run in a single season, making a new record that lasted for 34 years.

First Woman on the Supreme Court of the United States
On September 25, 1981, Sandra Day O'Connor officially became the first woman to be a judge on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Stephen Ambrose - The Popular Historian
Popular historian Stephen Ambrose, most well-known for his numerous World War II books, wrote over thirty books and made history a popular pastime.

The Brownie Camera - Changing the Future of Photography
In 1900, the Eastman Kodak Company introduced a low-priced, point-and-shoot, hand-held camera -- the Brownie.

Insulin Discovered
Diabetes used to be a death sentence. Learn more about how medical researcher Frederick Banting and others discovered insulin.

Princess Diana Dies in Car Crash
On August 31, 1997, Diana, Princess of Wales died after being involved in a car accident. Diana had been riding in the Mercedes-Benz with her boyfriend (Dodi Al Fayed), bodyguard (Trevor Rees-Jones), and chauffer (Henri Paul) when the car crashed into a pillar of the tunnel under the Pont de l'Alma bridge in Paris while fleeing from paparazzi.

The First License Plates in the US - History
In order to create order on the roads, Massachusetts became the first U.S. state to issue license plates in 1903.

NAACP - When Was the NAACP Founded?
The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was founded on February 12, 1909.

Gandhi - Part 5
On January 30, 1948, 78-year-old Gandhi was gunned down by Hindu extremist Nathuram Godse. Page 5.

Did You Know...The Nickname "Tin Lizzie"
Priced so that the average American could afford it, Henry Ford sold his Model T from 1908 until 1927. Many also may know the Model T by its nickname, the

Martin Luther King Jr.'s Car Heading to Memphis
A lot had happened to the white 1966 Lincoln Continental used by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during the sanitation workers strike in 1968. The car, one of just a

Did You Know . . . Barbie's Full Name
The Barbie doll, which first appeared on the world-stage in 1959, was invented by Ruth Handler (co-founder of Mattel) after she realized that her daughter liked

Cause of Booker T. Washington's Death Found
The medical records of Booker T. Washington, the famous African-American who founded the Tuskegee Institute, have recently been re-examined during a medical

Did You Know...Gerald Ford's Real Name
Gerald Ford, the 38th President of the United States, was known for most of his life as Gerald

Lighter-Than-Air Craft History
The history of lighter-than-air flight began with the first hot-air balloon built in 1783 but took centuries to evolve into the Hindenburg.

Manhattan Project
From 1942 to 1945, U.S. scientists worked on a secret program called the Manhattan Project in an attempt to beat Nazi Germany to the creation of an atomic bomb.

Vietnam War Stories
A compilation of soldiers' stories about their life and their experiences while serving in the Vietnam War.

USS Cole Bombing
On October 12, 2000, the U.S.S. Cole was bombed after a small craft pulled up beside the Cole while it was at port in Yemen. Find out what happened during and after the Cole bombing.

ILOVEYOU Virus Hit Thousands of Computers
Though the 1999 Melissa virus warned us not to open attachments, we were still unprepared for the ILOVEYOU virus that hit on May 4, 2000.

Elian Gonzalez - The Stirring a Story of a Little Boy Found in an Inner Tube
On November 25, 1999, a little five-year-old boy named Elian Gonzales was found floating in an inner tube in the Atlantic Ocean. The story of this little Cuban boy stirred heated debate - was he a refugee in fear of his life or was he a son who had been torn away from his father? Read the stirring story of Elian Gonzales.

Sarin Gas Attack in Tokyo Subway
On March 20, 1995, members of the Aum Shinrikyo religious cult orchestrated a coordinated sarin gas attack on subway trains in Tokyo, Japan. The sarin gas killed a dozen people, injured thousands more, and is still considered the worst terrorist attack in Japan. Find out what happened.

Communism
Communism is a political ideology that believes the struggles between classes can be solved by eliminating private property. The concept of communism, founded by Karl Marx in 1848, first became a reality when Lenin used it in Russia. Find out more about this history of communism.

The Downfall of Communism
Beginning with the creation of the Soviet Union, communism began to gain footing in many countries around the world, vying for control of the world against capitalism. However, in the second part of the 20th century, communism began to weaken. Find out what happened to bring down communism as a world power.

The My Lai Massacre During the Vietnam War (1968)
On March 16, 1968, U.S. soldiers led by Lt. William Calley entered the Vietnamese village of My Lai and massacred as many as 504 civilians.

1939 Academy Awards
A look at the 12th Academy Awards ceremony, held on February 29, 1940.

Hitler's Statement Before His Suicide - Text
On April 29, 1945, in his underground bunker, as Adolf Hitler readied himself for death. he wrote a political document.