Italian Food Sitemap - Page 3 2016-09-26

Dario +, Dario Cecchini's answer to Fast Food
Dario +, Dario Cecchini's answer to Fast Food. Fine eating it is... Page 36.

To Serve with Cheese: Ideas from the Perini Deli
To Serve with Cheese: Ideas from the Perini Deli. Page 3.

Simone Ciattini's Crostini Misti, Mixed Crostini
Simone Ciattini's Crostini Misti, Mixed Crostini. Page 8.

Simone Ciattini's Bollito Misto, Mixed Boiled Meats
Simone Ciattini's Bollito Misto, Mixed Boiled Meats. Page 37.

Simone Ciattini's Sauces for Bollito
Simone Ciattini's Sauces for Bollito. Page 4.

Trippa
Tripe's origins are humble, but it can be quite elegant

Cannelloni & Manicotti
Easy, delicious and elegant -- who could ask for more? From your Mining Co. Guide

Chestnuts: a rare treat, and versatile too. About Chestnuts in Italy
Selecting and roasting Chestnuts

'Nduja, a fiery spreadable Calabrian salami
'Nduja, a fiery spreadable Calabrian salami. Page 13.

A Prosciutto salato from the Casentino, the highlands above Arezzo
A Prosciutto from the Casentino, the highlands above Arezzo. Page 21.

A fresh whole prosciutto, or ham
A fresh whole prosciutto, or ham. Page 26.

Bresaola is a finely sliced cured beef made by curing beef with spices and air drying it for several months.
Bresaola is a finely sliced cured beef made by curing beef with spices and air drying it for several months. Page 2.

Buristo: A rich Sienese pig's blood salami
Buristo: A rich Sienese pig's blood salami. Page 40.

Capocollo, or Coppa: Cured Pork Shoulder
Capocollo, or Coppa: Cured Pork Shoulder. Page 3.

Zampone and Cotechino, stuffed pig's trotter and a sausage made from the same filling: both from Modena
Zampone and Cotechino, stuffed pig's trotter and a sausage made from the same filling: both from Modena. Page 4.

Culatello, the most prized cold cut of Parma
Culatello, the most prized cold cut of Parma. Page 36.

Finocchiona is a Tuscan salami made with fennel
Finocchiona is a Tuscan salami made with fennel. Page 37.

Sopressa Vicentina, freshly made
Sopressa Vicentina, freshly made. Page 6.

Fresh pancetta, or pork side
Fresh pancetta, or pork side. Italian Food. Page 32.

Guanciale: Cured pig's jowl is a considerable delicacy
Guanciale: Cured pig's jowl is a considerable delicacy. Page 27.

Cinta Senese: Siena's classic heirloom pig
Cinta Senese: Siena's classic heirloom pig

Freshly sliced Lardo di Colonnata
Freshly sliced Lardo di Colonnata. Page 28.

Luganega sausages, one with fennel and the other with hot pepper
Luganega sausages, one with fennel and the other with hot pepper. Page 16.

Mortadella di Bologna
Mortadella di Bologna. Italian Food. Page 14.

Pancetta Arrotolata: Rolled up pancetta
Pancetta Arrotolata: Rolled up pancetta. Page 35.

Pancetta tesa, or rigatino, or carne secca
Pancetta tesa, or rigatino, or carne secca. Page 31.

Artisinal prosciutto salato
Artisinal prosciutto salato. Italian Food. Page 20.

Prosciutto dolce di Modena
Prosciutto dolce di Modena is quite similar to Prosciutto di Parma. Page 17.

Finely sliced Prosciutto dolce di Modena
Finely sliced Prosciutto dolce di Modena. Page 18.

Prosciutto San Daniele
Prosciutto San Daniele. Italian Food. Page 23.

Prosciutto Toscano DOP, or Prosciutto Salato
Prosciutto Toscano, or Prosciutto Salato. Page 19.

Prosciutto di Cinghiale: Wild boar prosciutto still has bristles.
Prosciutto di Cinghiale: Wild boar prosciutto still has bristles. Page 24.

The fat of Prosciutto Salato can be rosy
The fat of Prosciutto Salato can be rosy. Page 22.

Salame Felino: a pork salami from the town of Felino, in Emilia Romagna
Salame Felino: a pork salami from the town of Felino, in Emilia Romagna. Page 9.

Salame Milanese: Fine grained, and with a mixture of beef and pork
Salame Milanese: Fine grained, and with a mixture of beef and pork. Page 10.

Salame Toscano
Salame Toscano. Italian Food. Page 5.

Salame Ungherese is a fine-grained mix of pork, pork fat, and beef, lightly smoked
Salame Ungherese is a fine-grained mix of pork, pork fat, and beef, lightly smoked. Page 11.

Salamino Piccante: Pepperoni
Salamino Piccante: Pepperoni. Italian Food. Page 12.

Salsicce Fresche, fresh Italian sausages
Salsicce Fresche, fresh Italian sausages. Page 15.

Sbriciolona
Sbriciolona: A crumbly fennel-flavored Tuscan salami. Page 38.

Seasoned Sopressa Vicentina
Seasoned Sopressa Vicentina. Italian Food. Page 7.

Slicing Lardo di Colonnata, fresh from the tub
Slicing Lardo di Colonnata, fresh from the tub. Page 30.

Soppressata: The Tuscan version is made with pork cuttings, and cooked
Soppressata: The Tuscan version is made with pork cuttings, and cooked. Page 39.

Speck, the Alto Adige's smoked Prosciutto
Speck, the Alto Adige's smoked Prosciutto. Page 25.

Tarese, A Variation on Pancetta from the Valdarno: Sliced to show texture
Tarese, A Variation on Pancetta from the Valdarno: Sliced to show texture. Page 34.

Tarese, A Variation on Pancetta
Tarese, A Variation on Pancetta from the Valdarno. Page 33.

Wild Boar Salamino and Lonzino, Cured Pork Loin
Wild Boar Salamino and Lonzino, Cured Pork Loin. Page 8.

Lardo di Colonnata, on display in a shop in Colonnata
Lardo di Colonnata, on display in a shop in Colonnata. Page 29.

Piatti: Italian Restaurant Dishes
In Italian, the word

Piatti: Italian Restaurant Dishes
In Italian, the word

Piatti: Italian Restaurant Dishes
In Italian, the word

Piatti: Italian Restaurant Dishes
In Italian, the word

Piatti: Italian Restaurant Dishes
In Italian, the word

Salumi - Italian Cold Cuts
Salumi is the Italian word for cold cuts, which include salame (salami in English), prosciutto, pancetta, cured lard, and all cuts of meat.

Salumi - Italian Cold Cuts
Salumi is the Italian word for cold cuts, which include salame (salami in English), prosciutto, pancetta, cured lard, and all cuts of meat.

Salumi - Italian Cold Cuts
Salumi is the Italian word for cold cuts, which include salame (salami in English), prosciutto, pancetta, cured lard, and all cuts of meat.

Salumi - Italian Cold Cuts
Salumi is the Italian word for cold cuts, which include salame (salami in English), prosciutto, pancetta, cured lard, and all cuts of meat.

Ham Hocks, or: Stinco di Maiale
Pork shanks, and pork hocks are quite tasty and quite economical, and perfect for slow-cooking in the winter months, when they will bring warmth to home and table.

A Tomatoless Pizza Bianca with Prosiuctto Cotto, Cooked Ham
A Tomatoless Pizza Bianca with Prosiuctto Cotto, Cooked Ham, from the Pizzeria Cotto a Puntino in Florence. Page 17.

Pizza Capricciosa: A Simple Interpretation
Pizza Capricciosa: A Simple Interpretation. Page 5.

Pizza Margherita
Pizza Margherita. Italian Food.

Pizza Vegetariana
Pizza Vegetariana. Italian Food. Page 6.

Pizza Vera Napoli, With Anchovies & More
Pizza Vera Napoli, With Anchovies & More, From Florence's Pizzaria Cotta a Puntino. Page 3.

Pizza ai Quattro Formaggi, with Four Cheeses
Pizza ai Quattro Formaggi, with Four Cheeses, From Florence's Pizzaria Cotta a Puntino. Page 4.

Pizza Shots From Italian Pizzerie
Pizza Shots From Italian Pizzerie: Margherita, Capricciosa, Quattro Formaggi, Contadina... Tremendous Variety!

A Calzone, stuffed with all sorts of good things
A Calzone, stuffed with all sorts of good things. Page 7.

Another Pizza Margherita
Another Pizza Margherita. Italian Food. Page 2.

Pizza Brie e Prosciutto, with Arugola Too
Pizza Brie e Prosciutto, with Arugola Too. Page 11.

Pizza Prosciutto e Gorgonzola
Pizza Prosciutto e Gorgonzola. Italian Food. Page 12.

Pizza Vulcano
Pizza Vulcano. Italian Food. Page 8.

Pizza Campagnola
Pizza Campagnola. Italian Food. Page 13.

Pizza Rustica
Pizza Rustica. Italian Food. Page 14.

Pizza Shots From Italian Pizzerie
Pizza Shots From Italian Pizzerie: Margherita, Capricciosa, Quattro Formaggi, Contadina... Tremendous Variety!

Havana: A Rolled up Pizza with Pancetta and Stracchino Cheese
Havana: A Rolled up Pizza with Pancetta and Stracchino Cheese. Page 9.

Pane Arabo: A Pizza Disk Split, and Stuffed With...
Pane Arabo: A Pizza Disk Split, and Stuffed With... Page 18.

Pane Arabo: The stuffing is Proesciutto, and a Tasty Salad
Pane Arabo: The stuffing is Proesciutto, and a Tasty Salad. Page 19.

Pizza Bacio: Onions, Gorgonzola, and Pepperoni
Pizza Bacio: Onions, Gorgonzola, and Pepperoni. Page 16.

Pizza Vellutata, With Zucchini Cream, Tomatoes and More
Pizza Vellutata, With Zucchini Cream, Tomatoes and More. Page 15.

Pizza Siciliana, in a Pizzeria in Alba (Piemonte)
Pizza Siciliana, in a Pizzeria in Alba (Piemonte). Page 10.

A Recipe for Red Radicchio and Burrata Risotto
A recipe for risotto made with red Treviso radicchio and fresh burrata cheese.

La Cucina Marchigiana
Le Marche, or The Marches, on the Adriatic side of Italy, has a rich, veried cuisine that grows out of frugality and the need to draw the best from what little there was. In short, rustic, tasty recipes from one of Italy's less well-known regions.

La Cucina Abruzzese
Recipes froma wild and beautiful land

Fresh Tuna - Tonno Fresco
Fresh tuna is a wonderful treat, especially in the summer. About Italian tuna fishing traditions, and lots of tasty fresh tuna recipes.

Walnut Oil... Italy's Other Oil
Walnut oil, which was once the everyday oil in much of Northwestern Italy, is making a comeback. It's tasty, and versatile. About it, and recipes too.

What to Do With Walnut Oil - Italian Food
Walnut oil, which was once the everyday oil in much of Northwestern Italy, is making a comeback. It's tasty, and versatile. About it, and recipes too. Page 2.

Oh, Fiorentina! Or, How to Cook and Serve a Steak
Tuscany's signature dish is the Bistecca alla Fiorentina, a thick, succulent porterhouse cut. Depending upon how thick it is, there are a number of ways to present it, and here are a few.

La Fiorentina Cut Up
Though one can simply set a Fiorentina before the diner, it will likely be too big ofr one person. So you cut it up.

And a Thick Fiorentina?
Though the bistecca alla fiorentina you'll find in a supermarket is usually 1-1 1/2 inches thick, if you go to a good butcher they can be much larger.

La Fiorentina: How Dario Cecchini Cooks It
How to cook a thick porterhouse cut steak

Stand the Steak Upright
After you have grilled both sides, if the steak is thick enough you can stand it upright

La Fiorentina: Getting It Ready To Serve
You can simply set a steak in front of your diner, but there are other options as well. Here are a few.

And Serve It
Serving a Bistecca alla Fiorentina.

A Braciola! And Cooking It...
A Braciola! And Cooking It... Italian Food.

Preparing the Meat to Cut a Braciola
Preparing the Meat to Cut a Braciola

Cutting a Braciola
Cutting a Braciola. Italian Food.

What, Exactly, Is a Braciola?
What, Exactly, Is a Braciola? Italian Food.

Another Easy Way to Cook a Braciola
Another Easy Way to Cook a Braciola

The Cut For Braciole (in Tuscany): Groppa
The Cut For Braciole (in Tuscany): Groppa

Favorite Red Sauces For Pasta - Or, Tomato Sauce And Pasta Is Hard To Beat!
If you visit an Italian market during the summer months, you will find tomatoes: Red shot with green for salads, cherry for salads and sauce, and... San Marzano, or plum tomatoes. Bins and bins of them, and people buy them to take home and make tomato sauce -- what's called pomarola in Italy, and Marinara in the US -- to enjoy straight off, and also to set aside for the winter months. Here are some of my favorite tomatoey pasta sauces.

A classic thick soup (or thin risotto) made with rice and green peas.
A classic Venetian recipe for

A quick and easy recipe for a vegetarian lasagne dish.
A quick and easy recipe for authentic Italian-style Spinach and Ricotta Lasagne.

Step-by-Step: How to Make Besciamella (White Sauce)
Step-by-step instructions (with photos) for making besciamella (béchamel), a simple white sauce used in many Italian recipes.

Italian Food
Italian Food.

Italian Food
Italian Food.

Italian Food
Italian Food.

Step-by-Step: How to Make Besciamella (White Sauce)
Step-by-step instructions (with photos) for making besciamella (béchamel), a simple white sauce used in many Italian recipes.

Italian Food
Italian Food.

Italian Food
Italian Food.

Meltingly tender beef stewed in red wine with garlic and black pepper
A history of and recipe for Peposo, a traditional Tuscan beef stew with red wine, garlic, and black pepper.

Italian Food
Italian Food.

Step-by-Step: How to Make Soffritto
Step-by-step instructions (with photos) for making

Italian Food
Italian Food.

Italian Food
Italian Food.

What To Do With Leftover Pasta: Make a Frittata!
How to Make a Pasta Frittata: A great solution for giving new life to leftover pasta.

Tasty Sweet Treats
Crespelle, fritters, marmalades and more.

A Hearty Winter Vegetable Minestrone
Winter Minestrone: A hearty vegetable soup with Tuscan kale, black-eyed peas and winter root vegetables.

Italian Yule-Log Christmas Cake
A recipe for an Italian yule-log cake for the holidays.

One-Pan Pasta with Tomatoes, Basil, and Zucchini
A version of an easy pasta dish -- spaghetti with a tomato, zucchini, garlic, and basil -- that all cooks in one pan.

11 Ways to Eat Like an Italian
How to Eat Like an Italian: 11 Italian dining rules and traditions.

Spicy Spaghetti with Tomatoes and Arugula
A quick and easy recipe for Spicy Spaghetti with Tomatoes and Fresh Arugula

10 Essential Italian Ingredients
The Basic Italian Pantry: 10 essential ingredients for Italian cooking.

11 "Italian" Foods You Won't Find in Italy
A list of 'Italian' dishes not typically found in Italy.

6 Unspoken Italian Coffee Rules
Six rules for ordering and drinking coffee like a local in Italy.

Italian Fava Bean and Fennel Soup
Recipe for a traditional Sicilian fava bean soup.

New Year's Food Traditions in Italy
Traditional New Year's foods in Italy, with recipes.

Build-Your-Own Italian Christmas Menu
Traditional Christmas dishes and desserts from around Italy.

Italian-Style Carrot Cake (Torta Camilla)
A recipe for Italian-style

Spaghetti with Browned Butter and Ricotta Salata Cheese
A super quick, easy, and delicious recipe for Spaghetti with Browned Butter and Ricotta Salata Cheese (or Mizithra cheese).

Italian "Bones of the Dead" Cookies (Ossa di morti)
A traditional Italian recipe for

Pasta with Ham and Peas (Pasta con prosciutto cotto e piselli)
A simple, flavor-packed recipe for pasta with ham and peas in a creamy sauce.

An 'alternative' pesto of zucchini, mint, and pistachios
Recipe for a version of pesto made with zucchini, mint, and pistachios.

Tuscan-Style Salt Cod in Tomato Sauce
A traditional Tuscan recipe for Livorno-Style Fried Salt Cod in Tomato Sauce (Baccala' alla livornese).

Foods for the Feast Day of San Giuseppe (St. Joseph)
An article about the traditional foods associated with the Italian Feast Day of Saint Joseph (San Giuseppe) on March 19.

Roast-Pork Sandwiches from the Lazio region
A recipe for Roman-style porchetta (roast pork) sandwiches.

Italian-Style Sauteed Spinach with Pine Nuts
A quick and easy Italian recipe for sauteed spinach with pine nuts.

Italian-Style Lentils with Pancetta and Wine
A quick and easy recipe for Italian-style lentils with pancetta and wine.

30-Minute Stovetop Lasagna (Lasagne in padella)
A simple recipe for no-bake, stovetop lasagna that you can have on the table in 30 minutes or less!

Limoncello-Ricotta Cake
Recipe for a lemon and ricotta cake from Naples, traditionally made during Carnival time.

Spaghetti alla Carbonara
How to make classic Spaghetti alla Carbonara, with information on the dish's origins and wine pairing suggestions.

A Sicilian pasta recipe with fried eggplant and ricotta salata
A recipe for Sicilian-style Pasta alla Norma, with fried eggplants and ricotta salata cheese.

A Recipe for Italian-Style Chard-Gorgonzola Crepes
A recipe for Italian-style crepes (crespelle) made with Swiss chard and Gorgonzola cheese.

A Year-Round Recipe for Burrata with Fresh Fruit Coulis
A simple, no-cook recipe for a dessert made with fresh burrata cheese and a fresh, seasonal fruit coulis.

A recipe for puff-pastry shells with burrata and amarena cherries
A quick and easy recipe for puff-pastry shells filled with fresh burrata cheese and amarena cherries.

Pasta with Prosciutto and Porcini Mushrooms
A recipe for pasta with prosciutto and porcini mushrooms.

A Recipe for Tuscan-Style Beef Fillets in Green Peppercorn Sauce
A quick and simple recipe for Tuscan-style beef fillets with green peppercorn sauce.

Pizzoccheri della Valtellina (Buckwheat Pasta with Savoy Cabbage)
A traditional Italian recipe for Pizzoccheri della Valtellina - buckwheat pasta with Savoy cabbage, melted cheese, and potatoes.

Stuffed Zucchini (Zucchine ripiene)
A classic Italian recipe for stuffed zucchini (Zucchine ripiene).

Pumpkin or Winter Squash Jam
Some varieties of Italian winter squash are sizable, and when friends gave us one close to a yard long we started off with squash soup. One can only eat so much squash soup, however. Pouring through cookbooks turned up several other ideas, including squash jam, which gains from the addition of apples and pears. Quite good, in fact, and perfect over toast.

Castagnaccio -- A Traditional Tuscan Chestnut Cake
A recipe for traditional Tuscan chestnut cake -- a fall favorite -- with ideas for variations, including chocolate-and-cherry castagnaccio.

Pumpkin Risotto (Risotto di zucca gialla)
A warm and comforting autumn recipe for a classic Italian-style pumpkin risotto.

Pumpkin Roman-Style Semolina Gnocchi with Gorgonzola
A recipe for baked pumpkin 'gnocchi alla romana' (Roman semolina gnocchi) with a gorgonzola topping.

A Recipe for Classic Panna Cotta
Recipe for the classic Italian dessert panna cotta.

Roman Rice Fritters (Suppli')
Recipe for Roman Rice Fritters Stuffed with Mozzarella, Sausage and Tomato Sauce (Suppli').

Pugliese-Style Potato, Tomato and Ham Casserole
Traditional recipe for a potato-tomato casserole from the Salento region in Puglia, Italy.

Green Spring Vegetables Pasta Salad
Italian recipe for a pasta salad made with fresh, green springtime vegetables (Insalata di pasta al verde).

Easy Pasta with Broccoli Sauce (Pasta ai broccoli)
The pasta and broccoli cook together in the same pot -- for a self-made sauce!

Nicoise-Style Stuffed Bread (Pane alla nizzarda)
Nicoise-Style Stuffed Bread (Pane alla nizzarda), made with a baguette and fresh vegetables.

The original aperitivo cocktail from Harry's Bar in Venice.
A recipe for (and the story behind) the iconic aperitivo cocktail invented at Harry's Bar in Venice.

Tuscan-Style White Beans with Sausage (Fagioli all'uccelletto)
A recipe for traditional Tuscan-style cannellini beans with sausage (Fagioli all'uccelletto).

'Forbidden' Black Rice with Artichokes
An Italian recipe for black

Sage and Hazelnut Pesto (Pesto di salvia e nocciole)
A quick, no-cook recipe for unique take on pesto, made with fresh sage leaves and toasted hazelnuts.

A Recipe for Sicilian-Style Stuffed Eggplants
A quick and easy recipe for Sicilian-style stuffed eggplants (melanzane a barchetta).

Pasta with Pesto, Potatoes and Green Beans (Pasta al pesto avvantaggiato)
A recipe for 'pesto avvantaggiato,' a traditional pasta with pesto, potatoes and green beans dish from Liguria.

Minestrone Soup with Pesto
An Italian recipe for minestrone soup with pesto sauce.

Roast chicken breast rolls stuffed with fresh mozzarella and pesto
A quick and easy Italian recipe for roast chicken breast rolls stuffed with fresh mozzarella and pesto sauce -- ready in just about 20 minutes!

Pressing Olive Oil The Traditional Way: The Pressure Gauge
Olive presses squeeze hard. This isn't wine making, where one hears about soft pressing and people wince at the idea of more than two atmospheres. Rather, the press cranks up to 400 atmospheres (400 k/square cm, close to 900 pounds) and maintains that pressure by continuing to lift the floor of the press as the oil seeps out. It takes about a half hour to press the stack, after which Frencesco's assistant releases the pressure, removes the pressed paste and starts the cycle anew.

Pressing Olive Oil the Traditional Way
With a modern olive press the olives enter at one end, and the oil emerges from the other. Traditional presses are more labor intensive, but when carefully used give wonderful, richly aromatic olive oils. Francesco Nardi's press is one of the oldest in Tuscany, and his extravirgin olive oil is superb.

Making Olive Oil The Traditional Way: Gramolatrice and onto Fiscoli, Round Mats
The paste goes into a second tub called a gramolatrice, where it is stirred by several rotating paddles. The stirring breaks up the water-oil emulsion derived from the grinding process, and thus forms droplets of oil that can be more easily extracted from the paste during the subsequent pressing. Again, the stirring phase -- simple mechanical action with no heat or addition of water -- takes about a half hour.

Pressing Olive Oil The Traditional Way: The Oil Begins To Drip
Olive oil begins to drip down the sides of the stack, collecting in a trough at the base of the press, from whence it drains into a holding tank.

Pressing Olive Oil the Traditional Way: Into the Grinder
Traditional olive presses employ grindstones to grind the olives, reducing them to a paste from which the oil can be extracted. Unlike the grindstones of a mill, which are horizontally mounted, with one turning atop the other, the grindstones of an olive press are vertically mounted and rotate in a tub, crushing the olives against the floor of the tub.

Pressing Olive Oil The Traditional Way: The Press, Loaded
With the press loaded -- this volume of olive paste will yield 25-30 kilos, or a bit more than 30 liters (30 quarts) of oil -- Francesco turns on the hydraulics, and the floor of the press begins to rise, pressing the pads against the top of the press.

Pressing Olive Oil The Traditional Way: And here we have it!
Francesco Nardi's traditionally pressed extravirgin olive oil!

Pressing Olive Oil the Traditional Way: Rotating Grindstones
The grindstones of Francesco's press are made of granite, about 4 feet in diameter, and a bit more than a foot thick. They weigh about 1.5 metric tons each, and are turned by an electric motor. The paste is ready for the next step when it becomes oily, Francesco says. It takes about a half hour of grinding to reach this stage.

Pressing Olive Oil The Traditional Way: Stacking the Press
The fiscoli, with their layers of olive paste, are stacked in the press, in five-pad stacks separated by steel plates.

Pressing Olive Oil The Traditional Way: Into the Centrifuge
The oil that emerges from the press is anything but pure -- there's still quite a bit of solid matter in it, and also a fair amount of water. So Francesco pumps it though two settling tanks, where some of the solid material settles out, and them into a centrifuge that separates the water from the oil.

A light pasta with prawns, zucchini, arugula and mint.
A summery Italian pasta dish made with fresh prawns, zucchini, lemon, mint, capers and arugula.

A Fresh Porcino Mushroom
Il Fungo Porcino, Boletus edulis, is one of God's great gifts to humanity: a rich, heady, meaty mushroom that is amazingly versatile, delicate enough to give grace to an elegant stew or sauce, and yet vigorous enough to stand up to something as flavorful as a thick grilled steak accompanied by a good Brunello or Barolo. Page 43.

Basilico: Fresh Basil
Basilico, Fresh Basil: Since I live in Italy, despite claims that basil originated in the Far East I associate it with Italian cooking, and especially Ligurian cuisine. It has in any case been grown in Southern Europe for a long time: According to legend, Saints Constantine and Helen found a clump of the herb growing where the True Cross was buried, and its European name, which derives from the Greek Basileus, or King, refers to this event. Page 7.

Fichi d'India: Prickly Pears
Fichi D'India, or Prickly Pears:If you go for a drive in the Italian countryside, from Tuscany on south, you will see, where there are sun-bleached stone walls and little else, broad-leafed cactuses with (if the season's right) prickly pears. The pears are good to eat, but harvesting them requires considerable care: In addition to the clearly evident spines and tufts of tiny spines, prickly pears are covered with hair-like horrors called glochids that penetrate the skin and smart terribly... Page 39.

Funghi Coltivati: Champignons, or Button Mushrooms, or White Mushrooms
Many Italian recipes call for wild mushrooms, in particular porcini, finferli and ovoli. However, these mushrooms are all strongly flavored, and tend to take center stage. While this is fine in, say, a mushroom risotto, it's not so good in a delicate creamed chicken with mushooms, and in these cases Italians turn to Agaricus bisporus, the classic cultivated mushroom known the world over as Champignons. Page 46.

Mele Golden e Gala: Golden Delicious & Gala Apples
Mele Golden e Gala: Golden Delicious & Gala Apples. Page 54.

Mele Renette: Gray Pippin Apples or Perhaps Gray Pearmain Apples
Mele Renette: Gray Pippin Apples or Perhaps Gray Pearmain Apples. Though people do eat mele renette raw, they are primarily baking apples, and are rather tart, with slightly lemony acidity, and grainy, almost mealy, in texture. They're also quite good, and one of the more eagerly awaited apples each fall. Much of the Italian production comes from Trentino Alto Adige, and in particular the Val di Non (one of Europe's most important apple-producing areas). Page 55.

Mikawa, A Cross Between Mandaranci & Grapefruit
If you drive out into the country from just about any place south of Rome you'll soon find yourself driving through citrus groves: Oranges, bitter oranges, lemons, tangerines, clementines, grapefruit... And, since citrus fruit easily cross breed, new things such as the Miyagawa, which is, as its name suggests, a Japanese development: A cross between grapefruit and clementines or mandaranci. Page 57.

Ovoli Mushrooms (Amanita caesarea)
Don't let the appearance of these mushrooms sway you: Ovoli are perhaps the most eagerly sought out Italian mushroom. Though I have found recipes for grilled ovolo caps, which strike me as an example of wretched excess, one generally hears ovoli should be transformed into an Ovolo salad. Page 42.

Pera (or Mela) Cotogna
Pera (or Mela) Cotogna: The word Cotogna (pronounced cotonia) translates as quince, though it's not quite that easy in Italian markets. In Tuscany quinces of the sort pictured here can be labeled either Pera Cotogna or Mela Cotogna (Pear-Quince & Apple-Quince, respectively), and you may find one term used in one stand at a market, and the other at another. Page 65.

Pere Abate: Abate Pears
Pere Abate, Abate Pears: The Abate pear derives its name from Abbé Fetel, the French Abbot who developed the cultivar in 1866, and outside of Italy you may also find it called the Fetel pear or the Abbe Fetel. In Italy, it has proven ideally suited to the orchards of Emilia Romagna, and much of the Italian Pera Abate crop comes from this region. Page 66.

Pere Coscia: Coscia Pears
Pere Coscia, Or Coscia Pears: The Pera Coscia is a small, precocious pear that first appears in late summer, and continues through the beginning of autumn. Though it grows in much of Italy, the finest are said to be Sicilian, from the flanks of Mount Etna. Page 67.

Pere Williams: Williams, or Bartlet Pears
Pere Williams, or Bartlet Pears: The Williams Pear is, as one might guess from the name, of English origin: the cultivar was developed sometime between 1765 and 1770 by a schoolmaster named either Mr. Stair or Mr. Wheeler, who sold his pear to a nurseryman named Williams. At present it is one of the most widely grown pears in the world. Page 68.

Porcini Freschi: Fresh Porcini Mushrooms
Il Fungo Porcino, Boletus edulis, is one of God's great gifts to humanity: a rich, heady, meaty mushroom that is amazingly versatile, delicate enough to give grace to an elegant stew or sauce, and yet vigorous enough to stand up to something as flavorful as a thick grilled steak accompanied by a good Brunello or Barolo. Page 44.

Una Treccia d'Aglio: A Garlic Braid
Treccia D'Aglio, a Garlic Braid: Italian cooking is less garlicky than many think, though it does play a vital roll in Italian kitchens, and there are some tremendous exceptions to this generalization.

Uva Bianca e Nera: White & Red Table Grapes
Uva Bianca e Nera, or White & Red Table Grapes: Table grapes differ considerably from wine grapes: they're larger, less sweet, softer skinned, and -- most importantly -- are much less seedy. Much of the Italian table grape crop comes from the South, in particular Puglia and Sicily, but you will find the occasional vine in people's yards further north. Page 88.

Uva Da Vino, Wine Grapes for Schiacciata Con L'Uva
Uva Da Vino, Wine Grapes for Schiacciata Con L'Uva: Uva da Vino are wine grapes; with respect to table grapes they are considerably smaller, have thicker skins, are much sweeter, and are usually quite seedy. Seedy enough to be crunchy, but some people enjoy eating them, and therefore you will find them in the markets for a brief period during the fall. Page 90.

Zucca Napoletana: A Long Squash
Zucca Napoletana: Squash is one of the classic winter vegetables: it keeps very well, and is quite versatile, figuring prominently in pasta dishes, risotti, soups, side dishes, and even desserts. The squash pictured here is a Neapolitan squash, which is about a yard (a meter) long and 8-10 inches (20 cm) thick. Zucca Napoletana tastes rather like butternut squash. Page 96.

Uva Moscato e Uva Nera: Moscato Grapes And Red Grapes
Here we have a mix of grapes: White Moscato grapes, which are wonderful at table (and are also used to make moscato-based wines such as Moscato D'Asti and many passiti (dessert wines), and small red grapes that may be table grapes, or could be wine grapes; to be frank I don't recall, but am tempted to say wine grapes because of their size and inky dark color. If they are wine grapes they will be quite sweet, very tasty, and also seedy, something people either like or do not. Page 89.

Aglio e Peperoncino: Garlic and Hot Peppers
Aglio e Peperoncino: Garlic and Hot Peppers. Page 2.

A Cut Savoy Cabbage
Cabbage is one of the standard Italian winter vegetables, and in much of the North Savoy Cabbage, with its bubbly leaves, is extremely popular. With good reason: It's healthy, nutritious, and tasty besides. Italian markets sell them whole, and cut, like this one. Page 30.

Asparagi Bianchi Del Bassano: White Asparagus From Bassano
Italians have been enjoying asparagus for a very long time: We know that one Roman expression for getting something done quickly was do it in the time it takes to cook asparagus. So they ate it cooked quickly. Page 6.

Asparagi, Fresh Green Asparagus
Italians have been enjoying asparagus for a very long time: We know that one Roman expression for getting something done quickly was do it in the time it takes to cook asparagus. So they ate it cooked quickly. Page 5.

Baby Artichokes for Canning: Carciofini da Sott'Oli
Baby Artichokes for Canning: Carciofini da Sott'Oli. Page 20.

Baby Zucchini, with Blossoms
Zucchini were, in the past, the quintessential Italian summer vegetable: Tiny, flavorful baby zucchini of the sort pictured here (with their blossoms) would appear in the markets in mid-spring, to be joined by larger zucchini by early summer, and both remained a fixture of the Italian table throughout the rest of the summer months. Page 92.

Bietole: Beets
Bietole, also known as rape rosse in Italian, are known as beets or beetroots in English. They belong to the same family as sugar beets, and are rich in fiber and compounds that support both the digestion and liver function. They are also rich in minerals, including magnesium, iron and calcium, and have been shown to be effective in preventing certain cancers. A down side? They also contain oxalic acid, and therefore should be avoided by those prone to kidney or gall stones. Page 8.

Bietoline: Beet Greens or Chard
Bietoline, beet greens, are quite common in Italy, and I was therefore surprised to discover,courtesy of Molly Watson's greens page, that in the US one generally only finds them atop beets in farmers' markets. A pity, because they're delicately flavored and quite versatile,working well as either a side dish (wilted, and sauted the way one might prepare spinaci rifatti) or as an ingredient. You will also find leafy green chard labeled bietoline in Italian markets, and that is what we have here. Page 9.

Borlotti (Cranberry Beans) and Cannellini (White Beans), unshelled
If you visit an Italian market in summer you will find bins overflowing with cannellini and borlotti in their pods. It does take a while to shell them, but it's time well spent, as fresh beans are much tastier than dried. Page 10.

Freshly Shelled Borlotti (Cranberry Beans) and Cannellini (White Beans)
Freshly shelled beans from an Italian market. About beans, cannellini (white beans) and borlotti (cranberry beans) in particular, and serving suggestions too. Page 11.

Broccoli in an Italian market
Broccoli is quite healthy. It's an excellent source of vitamin C, several vitamins of the B group, calcium and iron, and is both high in fiber and low in calories (27 per quarter pound, 100 g). More recent studies also show that broccoli contains compounds that help purify the blood, and thus protect against at variety of maladies including heart disease and cancer. Page 13.

Broccolo Romanesco, a green variety of cauliflower grown in Lazio
Cauliflower is one of the most popular winter vegetables in Italy, and though white cauliflower is the most common kind, there are others too. Broccolo Romanesco is, as one might guess from the name, grown primarily in the region of Lazio (of which Rome is the Capital). Though it looks very different, in terms of taste it is quite similar to regular white cauliflower. Page 12.

Bulb Fennel
Despite its resemblance to an onion, bulb fennel is one of the most delicately flavored winter vegetables, and versatile too -- raw it adds pleasing anise-laced overtones to a salad or is an invaluable addition to a pinzimonio (raw vegetables), especially when the new olive oil is in, and cooked it is a wonderful foil for all sorts of wintry dishes, supporting but never distracting from what it's being served with. Page 14.

Cachi or Diospri: Persimmons
Cachi or Diospri: Persimmons. Though they originated in the Orient, Italy has lots of persimmon trees, both in people's yards and in the gardens of estates. Their popularity is actually not that surprising. The trees are quite pretty, and the fruit, bright golden-orange orbs, adds a pleasing splash of color during late autumn, when most things look rather drab. The fruits themselves are quite firm until they ripen, at which point they become voluptuously soft, and almost gelatinous in texture. Page 15.

Capperi Sotto Sale: Salted Capers
Capers are the unripened buds of the caper plant, Capparis spinosa, which grows spontaneously in cracks in brick or stone walls (or on cliffsides) throughout much of Italy. The buds are harvested by hand, dried, and then either pickled or salted. Here we have Salted Capers. Page 16.

Carciofi Morellini, Morellino Artichokes
Artichokes, the immature flowers of a member of the thistle family, are one of the nicest things about winter in Central Italy; they come in a tremendous variety of shapes and colors, from tiny delicate ones well suited for being eaten raw in pinzimonio, to purplish green medium-sized ones such as the Morellino shown here, which are suitable for sautéing, making spaghetti sauce, and whatnot, to Carciofi Romaneschi, large round artichokes ideally suited for stuffing. Page 17.

Carciofi Romaneschi, Large Round Artichokes Perfect For Stuffing
Carciofi Romaneschi, Large Round Artichokes Perfect For Stuffing. Page 18.

Cardi: Cardoons
When asked to describe cardoons, Elizabeth Faulkner replied,

Cardi Puliti, or Cleaned Cardoons
Cardi Puliti, or Cleaned Cardoons: When asked to describe cardoons, Elizabeth Faulkner replied,

Carote: Freshly Picked Carrots
Carote: Carrots are a fixture in Italian markets. Given their popularity, one might expect them to appear often at table, but they don't: While there are some carrot recipes, Italians generally consider the carrot to be an odore, or scent, i.e. an herb. Though there are some recipes, and they do go into tossed salads. Page 23.

Castagne: Chestnuts
Castagne: The chestnut has long played an important part in the Mediterranean diet: Homer mentions chestnuts, and Pliny even says which kinds of chestnuts were grown in Southern Italy. With time chestnut cultivation spread throughout the peninsula, because they were one of the few food crops that could be grown on steep mountain slopes, and also one of the few crops that could be expected to provide sustenance through the long winter months. Page 24.

Cavolfiore, Cauliflower
Cauliflower is one of the most popular winter vegetables in Italy. About 40% of the crop is grown in Campania, while Tuscany and the Marches are also major suppliers. The season begins in October and extends until May, with a variety of cultivars coming to market as the season progresses; in addition to the classic white cauliflower there are specialty cultivars, including a lime green version grown around Rome and a purple variety grown in Sicily. Page 25.

Cavolo Cappuccio Bianco: Green Cabbage
Cavolo cappuccio is the firm, round, smooth-leaved head cabbage that can be either purplish red or pale green. It's one of the more abundant Italian cabbages, grown throughout the land, and in particular in Lombardia and the Veneto. Here we have green cabbage. Page 26.

Cavolo Cappuccio Rosso: Red Cabbage
Cavolo cappuccio is the firm, round, smooth-leaved head cabbage that can be either purplish red or pale green. It's one of the more abundant Italian cabbages, grown throughout the land, and in particular in Lombardia and the Veneto. Here we have red cabbage. Page 27.

Cavolo Nero: Black Leaf Kale
Cavolo Nero: In the English-speaking world some call Black Leaf Kale Cavolo Nero, while others call it dinosaur kale or laciniato kale or cabbage (laciniato is a botanical term that means uneven, like a fringe, and refers to the leaves). You may have better luck finding it in an organic produce market than in a larger less specialized market. If you simply cannot find it, seeds are readily available on the Internet, and it is easy to grow. Page 28.

A Head of Savoy Cabbage in an Italian Market
Cabbage is one of the standard Italian winter vegetables, and in much of the North Savoy Cabbage, with its bubbly leaves, is extremely popular. With good reason: It's healthy, nutritious, and tasty besides. Page 29.

Cedri: Citrons
Canaroni: Citron, Citrus medica, is one of the oldest types of citrus fruit, and was introduced to Europe from Central Asia thousands of years ago: Pliny the Elder calls it Assyrian Apple in his Naturalis Historia. At that time citrons were used primarily as a mosquito repellent (and to this day a bright yellow citrussy repellent called citronella is common in Italy). Page 3.

Cime di Rapa, Broccoli Raab
Broccoli Raab or Rapini (Brassica rapa var. cymosa), which are also known as cime di rapa in Italy, are a wilder member of the broccoli family with small, fairly loose florets intermingled among the leaves of the plant; by comparison with broccoli, broccoli raab are much leafier and one eats the entire plant. They first appear in Italian markets in late November/early December, and they persist through March, or even April if it stays cold. Page 31.

Cipolle Bianche, White Onions
Onions are perhaps the universal vegetable; they occur in almost every cuisine across the globe, and it comes as no surprise that they were one of the first vegetables to be planted: The Egyptians grew (and worshiped) them, the Israelites mourned their absence during the Exodus (Numbers 11:5), and the Romans, who consumed them avidly, made certain that they were readily available throughout the Empire. Page 32.

Cipolle Rosse: Red Onions
Onions are perhaps the universal vegetable; they occur in almost every cuisine across the globe, and it comes as no surprise that they were one of the first vegetables to be planted: The Egyptians grew (and worshiped) them, the Israelites mourned their absence during the Exodus (Numbers 11:5), and the Romans, who consumed them avidly, made certain that they were readily available throughout the Empire. Page 33.

Cipolle di Tropea, Sweet Onions from Tropea
Cipolle di Tropea, These are sweet onions, much like American Vidalias, and are especially prized for salads and such. Page 34.

Fagioli Serpenti, Tuscan Snake Beans
Fagioli Serpenti, Tuscan Snake Beans. Page 36.

Fagiolini: String, or Green Beans
Fagiolini: String, or green beans are one of the most popular summer vegetables in Italy. Page 35.

Fava Bean Pods
Though peas are the most unequivocal proof that spring is arriving, fresh Fava beans are one of the first things to appear in the markets after the winter's chill. They're distinctive, with a vegetal bitterness you will or will not like -- there's no middle ground -- and are wonderful served raw with chewy fresh Pecorino cheese. Page 37.

Though there are many recipes for fava beans, the classic Italian way to enjoy them is with not too sharp pecorino cheese.
Fava Beans and Cheese. Italian Food. Page 38.

Finferli or Gallinacci: Chanterelle Mushrooms
Finferli are fairly bright yellowish orange wild mushrooms that are known by a variety of names, including Gallinacci or galletti in Italy, and Chanterelles in France. They're about 2 inches tall at the most, and their caps expand out of their stalks, rather like trumpet bells. They dry well, and will keep for months after they have been dried, in a tightly closed jar. Page 41.

Fiori di Zucca, Squash Blossoms
If you visit an Italian market in the spring you will almost certainly find zucchini blossoms, generally attached to the bases of baby zucchini, or squash blossoms. They're one of the great delights of late spring/early summer, and while the most common use for them is frying, there are many other options as well. Page 91.

Fragole: Freshly Picked Strawberries!
Fragole, or Freshly Picked Strawberries: Time was that strawberries were a rare treat, tiny bursts of flavor gathered in the forests when the conditions were right. And the best strawberries still are, in my opinion, the wild ones you occasionally come across as you hike in the woods. Problem is, they're so good the chances are you'll eat them on the spot.... Page 40.

Friggitelli or Friarelli: Mild Frying Peppers
Friggitelli, which are also known as Friarelli, are small sized, slender, thin-walled, mild south Italian peppers that are perfect for frying. In their absence use something similarly shaped; bell peppers would be too meaty and also too large. As I said, friarelli are mild; if you want you could use something hotter, but some of your diners may run into problems if you do. Page 63.

Lattuga Iceberg: Iceberg Lettuce
Lattuga Iceberg: Iceberg Lettuce. Page 47.

Lattuga Romana: Romaine Lettuce
Lattuga Romana, or Romaine Lettuce: Lattuga Romana is said to have been introduced to Europe through Rome, a very long time ago. The French call it Laitue Romaine, from hence its English name. It is low in calories, and rich in vitamins K, A and C; it also has significant amounts of a number of other vitamins and minerals, and is rich in fiber. In short, it's good for you. Page 48.

Lattughe Rosse e Verdi: Red and Green Lettuces
Lattughe Rosse e Verdi translates as Red and Green Lettuces. If you visit an Italian market, you will find, in addition to the various heads of lettuce such as Iceberg or Romaine, a great many salad greens, some picked in the fields and others grown in vegetable patches. I found this box labeled Lattughe Rosse e Verdi in Florence's Mercato di Sant'Ambrogio. Pretty, and they do add color and flavor to a tossed salad. Page 49.

Limoni di Sorrento, Sorrento's Fantastic Lemons
You'll find lemons growing most everywhere in Italy -- potted trees that people move into their greenhouses (or simply indoors) for the winter in the north, and in the ground in the south. The most famous Italian lemon regions are the Peninsula Sorrentina and the Costiera Amalfitana, which are the source of Limoncello. The lemons pictured here are from Sorrento. Page 4.

Melanzane: Eggplant, or Aubergines
In introducing eggplant in La Scienza in Cucina, Pellegrino Artusi said the vegetable was hard to find in Florentine markets when he was young (the 1830s), and that most people hesitated to try it because it was

Melograni, or Pomegranates
Melograni, or Pomegranates: According to legend, as Persephone was leaving the Underworld, Hades, who really did love her, offered her a pomegranate from one of the trees in his garden. She ate some seeds and his joy knew no bounds: Those who eat the fruits of Death can never return to life... Page 56.

Noci: Walnuts
Noci: Walnuts are said to have originated somewhere to the east -- perhaps China or India -- but have long been popular in Europe as well: The Romans greatly enjoyed them, especially at the end of the meal (as do modern Italians), and they have always played an important role in desserts, either as toppings (chopped or whole) or as principal ingredients. They also occur in savory dishes, though less often. Page 58.

Odori: Scents, or Herbs (Sage, Rosemary, Parsley, Garlic)
The Italian word for herbs is odori, or scents, and if you buy your produce from a vegetable stand, the greengrocer will usually slip a few herbs into your bag before handing it to you. Here we have garlic, with parsly, rosemary and sage. Page 59.

Patate: Potatoes
Patate: Potatoes are nutritious: As one might expect, they're an excellent source of carbohydrates, but they also have high-quality proteins that contain all the essential amino acids, as well as vitamins C and B1, thiamin, and potassium. Moreover, an unseasoned potato has about the same amount of calories as a similarly sized apple, and when they're served plain they're helpful in controlling obesity because they're filling. Page 60.

Peperoni Gialli e Rossi: Yellow and Red Bell Peppers
Peperoni Gialli e Rossi: Peppers are natives of the New World brought home by the Spaniards. We're fortunate that they did; while the tomato is perhaps the vegetable (fruit, actually) that people most associate with Italian cooking, life would be dull and dreary without peppers: Hotter peppers to liven things up and provide zing (they're used extensively in the South, especially Puglia and Calabria), and the milder, sweeter bell peppers in all sorts of recipes. Page 61.

Peperoni Verdi: Green Bell Peppers
Peperoni Verdi: Peppers are natives of the New World brought home by the Spaniards. We're fortunate that they did; while the tomato is perhaps the vegetable (fruit, actually) that people most associate with Italian cooking, life would be dull and dreary without peppers: Hotter peppers to liven things up and provide zing (they're used extensively in the South, especially Puglia and Calabria), and the milder, sweeter bell peppers in all sorts of recipes. Page 62.

Peperonicini, Hot Peppers, Sold by the String in an Italian Market
Hot peppers are extremely popular in some parts of Italy, for example the Abruzo, Puglia, and Calabria. Other regions largely ignore hot peppers, and some include hot peppers in just a few dishes, for example Rome's spaghetti aglio olio e peperoncino, or Livorno's cacciucco. Though the standard Italian for red pepper is peperoncino, the spice has a phenomenal number of local names, many of which either allude to its supposed aphrodesiac properties, or to the devil. Page 64.

Pesche Bianche: White Peaches
Peaches are one of the most popular Italian summer fruits, and you'll find bins of them at markets. The peaches shown here are white peaches. Page 70.

Pesche Gialle: Yellow Peaches
Pesche Gialle: Peaches are one of the most popular Italian summer fruits, and you'll find bins of them at markets. The peaches shown here are yellow peaches. Page 69.

Pesche Noci: Nectarines
Pesche Noci: Nectarines. Italian Food. Page 71.

Petonciani: Eggplant From A Tuscan Vegetable Patch
Petonciano (plural petonciani) is an old Tuscan term for eggplant, and seems fitting for these eggplants from a Tuscan vegetable patch. In introducing eggplant, Pellegrino Artusi said the vegetable was hard to find in Florentine markets when he was young (the 1830s), and that most people hesitated to try it because it was

Pomodori Costoluti: Tuscan heirloom tomatoes
Pomodori Costoluti: Tuscan heirloom tomatoes. Page 73.

Pomodori Merinda
Pomodori Merinda are a Sicilian heirloom tomato that's best when still shot with green. They're also best when they're not too large, and people generally eat them raw, finely sliced because they're thick-skinned, in salads or simply seasoned with olive oil, salt, and vinegar. Page 74.

Pomodori Pachino: Sicilian cherry tomatoes
Pomodori Pachino: Sicilian cherry tomatoes that are very nice in salads, though they can also be cooked -- for example, they make a fine addition to a pizza. Page 75.

Pomodori San Marzano, or Pomodori Perini: Plum tomatoes
These are Pomodori San Marzano if they're from the San Marzano production area on the flanks of Monte Vesuvio, or pomodori perini if they're not, and are in any case plum tomatoes: The classic canning and sauce tomato. Page 76.

Pomodori Secchi, Sun Dried Tomatoes
Pomodori Secchi, Sun Dried Tomatoes: Sun dried tomatoes are a standard South Italian antipasto and ingredient, and are also easy to make. They're less common in northern Italy: I once bought some in a deli in Florence and asked what to do with them; the guy shrugged and said he had no idea. Page 77.

Pomodori a Grappolo: Salad Tomatoes
These are Pomodori a grappolo, tomatoes sold by the bunch mostly destined towards salads, which are standard market fare, sun ripened in summer and (I expect) hothouse in winter. Page 72.

How to Cook with dried Porcini Mushrooms
Dried porcini mushrooms are a great substitute for fresh porcini mushrooms, which are only available after a period of rain in autumn or winter. Page 45.

Porri: Leeks
Leeks are a much more delicate relative of the onion, and very nice in the kitchen. Page 78.

Puntarelle: Roman Chicory
Puntarelle are a Roman variety of chicory, and despite their rather threatening appearance are quite good. The word puntarelle is Roman argot, and until fairly recently there was a certain amount of discussion outside of Rome as to what puntarelle are. Turns out they're chicory shoots of a variety known as Catalogna, picked while still young and tender. Page 79.

Radicchio Rosso di Treviso Precoce
Radicchio Rosso di Treviso Precoce: Radicchio Rosso di Treviso is one of the most distinctive Italian vegetables: Wine-red leaves, and bone-white ribs. It's produced only around Treviso, where the happy combination of abundant water, proper temperatures, and soil allow the farmers to apply the techniques also used to whiten Belgian Endive, with memorable results. Page 80.

Radicchio Rosso di Treviso Tardivo
Radicchio Rosso di Treviso Tardivo: Radicchio Rosso di Treviso is one of the most distinctive Italian vegetables: Wine-red leaves, and bone-white ribs. It's produced only around Treviso, where the happy combination of abundant water, proper temperatures, and soil allow the farmers to apply the techniques also used to whiten Belgian Endive, with memorable results. Page 81.

Radicchio Variegato di Castelfranco
The Marca Trevigiana, the countryside around Treviso, in the Veneto (Northeast of Venice) produces one of Italy's most distinctive vegetables: Radicchio Rosso. Radicchio rosso is red, or rather the leaves are, while the ribs are white. Radicchio Variegato di Castelfranco, which comes from a neighboring town, is a cross between a round-headed endive and Radicchio Rosso. It's known as The Edible Flower and is primarily used in salads. Page 82.

Ravanelli: Radishes
Ravanelli: One might not think of radishes as particularly Italian, but they are present in Italian produce markets. As one might expect, they are primarily used in salads, or as garnishes. And they are generally consumed raw, though Jen Hoy, About's Guide to Macrobiotic cooking, points out that their pungency can be softened considerably if they are briefly sauteed. Page 83.

Susine Regina Claudia: Regina Claudia Plums
Plums are Eastern in origin, but were already being grown in Syria before the arrival of the Romans. Pompey introduced them to Rome in 65 BC, and with time they entered the popular imagination as a sort of cure-all; plum trees were considered good luck, while the fruit was given to the sick to help them recover, and to the irascible to calm their minds. The Regina Claudia plum was introduced to Europe by returning Crusaders. Page 86.

Sedano: Celery
Sedano: Celery is quite common in Italy, and you'll find stacks of it in almost every Italian market. You might therefore be surprised to discover that it's not that common as a vegetable. Rather, Italians consider celery to be primarily an herb, and use it, with carrot and onion, in the battuto, the mixture of chopped herbs (what the French call a Mirepoix) that provides the flavor base for many stews and sauces. Page 84.

Spinaci: Spinach
Spinaci, or Spinach: one of the most popular winter vegetables in Italy, and now that it's available year round its popularity has only increased. The simplest thing to do with spinach is wilt it and then saute it with olive oil, garlic, and seasonings to make spinaci rifatti: As easy and simple a side dish as one could hope for, and healthy too. Page 85.

Susine Rosse, Red Plums
Plums are Eastern in origin, but were already being grown in Syria before the arrival of the Romans. Pompey introduced them to Rome in 65 BC, and with time they entered the popular imagination as a sort of cure-all; plum trees were considered good luck, while the fruit was given to the sick to help them recover, and to the irascible to calm their minds. Red Plums are one of the treats of summer. Page 87.

Zucca Gialla: Yellow Winter Squash
Squash is one of the classic winter vegetables: it keeps very well, and is quite versatile, figuring prominently in pasta dishes, risotti, soups, side dishes, and even desserts. Page 95.

Zucchine Tonde: Round Zucchini To Be Stuffed
Most Zucchini are elongate. Zucchine tonde are, instead, well, the word tondo means round, and that's what they are. And ideally suited for stuffing. Page 94.

Zucchini, With Blossoms
Zucchini were, in the past, the quintessential Italian summer vegetable: Tiny, flavorful baby zucchini would appear in the markets in mid-spring, to be joined by larger zucchini of the sort pictured here by early summer, and both remained a fixture of the Italian table throughout the rest of the summer months. Page 93.

Trimmed Artichokes, in Rome's Campo dei Fiori Market
Trimmed Artichokes, in Rome's Campo dei Fiori Market. How to prepare them, and carciofi alla romana. Page 19.

Striped Eggplant, in Florence's Mercato di San Lorenzo
Eggplant are native to India and the Far East, and though the standard European eggplant is a uniform purple in color, there are many other cultivars that grow in a variety of colors. Which are starting to appear in Italian markets; this striped eggplant is from the Mercato di San Lorenzo in Florence. Page 52.

Lenticchie di Mormanno, a Calabrian Heirloom Lentil
Lenticchie di Mormanno, a Calabrian Heirloom Lentil. Page 50.

Frutta e Verdura: Italian Fruits and Vegetables
Frutta e Verdura: Photos of fruits and vegetables from Italian produce markets

Frutta e Verdura: Italian Fruits and Vegetables
Frutta e Verdura: Photos of fruits and vegetables from Italian produce markets

Frutta e Verdura: Italian Fruits and Vegetables
Frutta e Verdura: Photos of fruits and vegetables from Italian produce markets

Frutta e Verdura: Italian Fruits and Vegetables
Frutta e Verdura: Photos of fruits and vegetables from Italian produce markets

Frutta e Verdura: Italian Fruits and Vegetables
Frutta e Verdura: Photos of fruits and vegetables from Italian produce markets

Frutta e Verdura: Italian Fruits and Vegetables
Frutta e Verdura: Photos of fruits and vegetables from Italian produce markets

Frutta e Verdura: Italian Fruits and Vegetables
Frutta e Verdura: Photos of fruits and vegetables from Italian produce markets

Frutta e Verdura: Italian Fruits and Vegetables
Frutta e Verdura: Photos of fruits and vegetables from Italian produce markets

Calabrian Octopus Salad Recipe
Octopus Salad, or Insalata di Polipi: While we're on the subject of octopus, here's a Calabrian recipe for octopus salad that will be a nice antipasto.

Florentine Easter Cake Recipe
Schiacciata alla Fiorentina is a traditional orangy Florentine Easter cake. It's wonderful filled with whipped cream, crema pasticcera, or or chantilly.

A refreshing summer treat with dark chocolate "seeds."
How to make a refreshing chilled watermelon and jasmine jelly, Sicilian-style.

Traditional toasted bread rounds topped with chicken-liver pate.
A recipe for a classic Tuscan antipasto: rich and savory chicken-liver pâté crostini.

Flavor-packed Italian foods you should be using
An introduction to six underrated or little-known Italian ingredients that you should be using in your cooking.

Under-the-radar Italian wines to seek out and try
An introduction to five underrated or lesser-known Italian wines.

Make Sicilian-style Italian ice from espresso.
How to make Sicilian-style coffee granita (Italian ice) at home.

Friselle
Friselle - whole-grain breads from Puglia. Page 9.

Italian Cold-Cut Platter
Italian mixed cold-cut platter. Italian Food. Page 2.

Strawberries with Balsamic Vinegar
Strawberries with Balsamic Vinegar. Page 18.

Fennel, Grapefruit and Arugula Salad
Fennel, Pink Grapefruit and Arugula Salad. Page 16.

Beef Carpaccio
Beef carpaccio from Harry's Bar in Venice. Page 12.

Bresaola with Arugula and Parmesan
Bresaola with arugula, parmesan, and lemon. Page 11.

Mixed Antipasti
Italian antipasto misto platter. Italian Food.

Peaches, Nectarines or Oranges in Marsala Wine
Peaches, Nectarines or Oranges in Marsala Wine. Page 19.

Bruschetta
Classic bruschetta topped with diced tomatoes, garlic, olive oil and basil. Page 7.

Pinzimonio
Pinzimonio - Italian raw vegetable crudite salad. Page 10.

Panzanella - Tuscan Bread Salad
Panzanella - Tuscan Bread Salad. Italian Food. Page 8.

Caprese Salad
Classic italian caprese salad. Italian Food. Page 4.

Sgroppino
Sgroppino - an Italian cocktail with prosecco, vodka and lemon sorbet. Page 20.

Chickpea, Caper and Tuna Salad
Chickpea, Caper and Tuna Salad. Italian Food. Page 15.

Buffalo Mozzarella with Cherry Tomatoes and Arugula
Buffalo Mozzarella with Cherry Tomatoes and Arugula. Page 5.

Italian-Style Beef Tartare
Italian-Style Beef Tartare. Italian Food. Page 13.

Prosciutto and Melon or Prosciutto and Figs
Prosciutto with cantaloupe or figs. Page 3.

Puntarelle
Puntarelle - Roman Chicory Salad. Page 14.

Crostini
Fresh ricotta crostini with lemon zest and black pepper. Page 6.

Burrata with Fresh-Berry Coulis
Burrata with Fresh-Berry Coulis. Italian Food. Page 17.

No-Cook Summer Dishes
Simple Italian meals for hot summer days that don't require any cooking.

How to make your own lemon liqueur -- the perfect summer digestivo!
How to make limoncello, Italian lemon liqueur.

A sweet, dessert salami made with chocolate and crisp biscuit pieces.
A traditional Italian recipe for dessert salami made with chocolate and cookies.

A rich, pink tomato-cream sauce made with vodka.
A recipe for Penne alla Vodka, also discussing the dish's origins and the role that vodka plays in the sauce.

Learn about Aperol's history and how to make an Aperol Spritz.
A brief history of the Aperol aperitivo and the popular Venetian cocktail, Aperol Spritz, with the recipe.

Sott'Oli & Sotto Aceti: Capturing Summer for the Winter Months
Sott'oli & Sotto Aceti: Pickling vegetables or packing them in oil: preserving summer bounty for the winter months.

Polpette & Polpettoni
Polpette & Polpettoni, meatballs and meatloaves

Cucina Milanese
Millano may attract many of Italy's best chefs, but the home cooking is fine too