Italian Food Sitemap - Page 6 2016-09-26

A Tuscan Antipasto Misto - Crostini ai Fegatini Di Pollo
Fegatini are chicken livers, and I can say from personal experience that even those who are not great fans of liver greet chicken liver crostini with a smile: the process of transforming the liver into paté works a magical transformation on the liver, which retains its livery accents but becomes somehow addictive too. Page 3.

A Tuscan Antipasto Misto - Crostini Verdi
There was a certain debate at our table about what these were, and we eventually decided they were based on broccoli. And quite good. I don't have a recipe for the broccoli paté, but one could achieve a similar effect with dried fava bean paté, or one could make crostini with spinach and anchovies. Page 4.

A Tuscan Antipasto Misto - Prosciutto
People have written books about Northern Italy's cured raw hams. Broadly speaking, prosciutto can be divided into two categories: dolce (sweet), and salato, casalingo, or Toscano (salty, home made, or Tuscan). Here we have the latter. Page 5.

A Tuscan Antipasto Misto - Salame
A Salame (plural salami, while cold cuts in general are called salumi -- note the u) is a cured sausage generally made by grinding lean pork with pork fat to make a paste, and stuffing the paste into a casing, generally pig's intestine. The salame is then aged in a cool dark, well ventilated place until it's ready. Like prosciutto, Italian salami is raw, with the meat being cured by the salt in the spice mix. Page 6.

A Tuscan Antipasto Misto - Finocchiona
Finocchiona is a variation on salami that supposedly owes its origins to a thief at a fair near the town of Prato, who stole a fresh salami and hid it in a stand of wild fennel. When he returned for it he discovered it had absorbed the aromas of its hiding place and had become fit for the Gods. Page 7.

A Tuscan Antipasto Misto - Capocollo
Also known as coppa, this is cured pork shoulder but. Again raw, and prepared with salt, herbs, and spices. Page 8.

A Tuscan Antipasto Misto - Pecorino Toscano
Pecorino Toscano is a mildly flavored, firm sheep's milk cheese that looks and tastes quite similar to Pecorino Sardo (and is quite different from the much saltier Pecorino Romano). Page 9.

Classic Italian Dishes: Vegetables
Classic Italian dishes : classic italian dishes caponata siciliana caponata recipe hard boiled egg eggplant parmesan

Classic Italian Puddings, Gelato & other Spoon Desserts
Classic Italian dishes : budino di cioccolato budino di riso classic italian dishes bianco mangiare bavarian cream

Classic Italian Dishes: Risotto
Classic Italian dishes : classic italian dishes risotto alla milanese layer cakes pizza pasta pasta soup

A Selection of Classic Italian Stuffed Pasta Dishes
Classic Italian dishes : pasta dishes stuffed pasta national cuisine italian communities sans serif

Classic Vegetable-Based Pasta Sauces
Classic Italian dishes: Pasta : zesty tomato sauce pasta sauces boscaiola sauce primavera sauce signature dish

Classic Italian Stews
Classic Italian dishes : classic italian dishes veal shanks david downie herbs and spices pizza pasta

Classic Italian Poultry Dishes
Classic Italian dishes : classic italian dishes recipe for chicken cacciatore pollo alla griglia italian poultry poultry dishes

Classic Italian Pork Dishes
Classic Italian dishes : classic italian dishes grilled pork chops recipe for spare ribs pork dishes layer cakes

Classic Italian Lamb Dishes
Classic Italian dishes : classic italian dishes lamb dishes lamb recipes baby potatoes abbacchio alla romana

Classic Italian Pies & Tarts
Classic Italian dishes : cassata alla siciliana classic italian dishes torta di tagliatelle torta di ricotta tagliatelle pasta

Classic Italian Cakes
Classic Italian dishes : classic italian dishes cassata alla siciliana panettone milano panettone ripieno layer cakes

A Selection of Cream & Cheese Based Pasta Sauces
Classic Italian dishes: Pasta : classic italian dishes aglio e olio pasta sauces sauce alfredo pasta dish

Clear & Light Soups, some with Pasta and some Without
Soup, Glorious Soup!: italian wedding soup egg drop soup amp light meat balls sans serif

Vegetable-Based Pasta Sauces
Pasta and Pasta Sauces: pasta sauces pasta fish boscaiola sauce sauce pasta pasta primavera

Biscotti & Other Cookies
Biscotti, fritters & more : almond biscotti anise cookies sicilian almond tasty coffee struffoli

Frittelle, Cenci and other Fried Delights
Biscotti, fritters & more : apple fritters struffoli christmas treat classic christmas sans serif

Italian Vegetables & Side Dishes: Eggplant
Vegetables & Side dishes: caponata siciliana caponata recipe italian vegetables eggplant parmesan side dishes

Contorni: Vegetables and other Side Dishes
Vegetables & Side dishes: bulb fennel vegetable pies sans serif side dishes brown gold

Sauce the Pasta
Season your pasta with the sauce. Page 10.

Flip the Ossibuchi to Brown their other Sides
Flip the ossibuchi to brown them on both sides. Page 2.

Make your Battuto
A battuto is the finely chopped mixture of herbs that flavor an Italian dish. In this case carrot, celery, onion, and parsley. Page 3.

Don't overchop it, and what to do next
If you overchop a battuto, the texture of the dish suffers. Page 4.

Add the Wine
Add the wine. Italian Food. Page 5.

Add the tomato
Tomato paste adds flavor, but also thickens a sauce. Page 6.

And then the Ossibuchi
Next, add the shanks, which will have lost a fair amount of fat by this time. Page 7.

Two Hours Later: Done!
Two Hours Later: Done! Italian Food. Page 8.

Remove the Ossibuchi to a Platter...
Remove the Ossibuchi to a Platter... Page 9.

In Italy They Call It Gravy
In Italy They Call It Gravy. Italian Food. Page 10.

No Tomato? Not Italian
No Tomato? Not Italian. Italian Food. Page 2.

Italian Cooking Is Heavy
Italian Cooking Is Heavy. Italian Food. Page 3.

Italian Meals Go On For Hours
Italian Meals Go On For Hours. Italian Food. Page 4.

Spaghetti With Meatballs Is An American Invention
I got a note the other day saying

In Italy, Everyone Has a Seven Fishes Dinner on Christmas Eve
In Italy, Everyone Has a Seven Fishes Dinner on Christmas Eve. Page 6.

The Chinese Invented Pasta and Ravioli
The Chinese Invented Pasta and Ravioli. Page 7.

Risotto Is Difficult To Make
Risotto Is Difficult To Make. Italian Food. Page 8.

Veal Francese is Italian
Veal Francese is Italian. Italian Food. Page 9.

La Cucina Siciliana
Sicilian cuisine is tremendously varied, drawing from the traditions of the many peoples who have settled the island. Page 2.

La Cucina Sarda
Though Sardegna is a major island, the cuisine is distinctly continental, with an emphasis on meats and vegetables. Page 3.

Making a Cheese Basket: Done!
Making a Cheese Basket: Done! Italian Food. Page 10.

Making a Cheese Basket: What You'll Need
Making a Cheese Basket: What You'll Need. Page 2.

Making a Cheese Basket: The Cheese?
Making a Cheese Basket: The Cheese? Gated cheese, either Parmigiano Reggiano, Grana Padano, Montasio, or Romano will work. Page 3.

Making a Cheese Basket: Sprinkle the Cheese
To make a cheese basket heat the skillet over a medium flame for 2-3 minutes. You want it to be hot but not searing. Sprinkle the cheese evenly over the pan. Page 4.

Making a Cheese Basket: By the Time You're Done Sprinkling...
By the time you have finished sprinkling the cheese it will have begun to melt, especially around the edges. Page 5.

Making a Cheese Basket: Continue Heating...
By the time you have finished sprinkling the cheese it will have begun to melt, especially around the edges. Continue heating, and the cheese will begin to bubble. Page 6.

Making a Cheese Basket: Continue Heating, And When it Begins to Brown Around the Edges...
Use the tongs to separate the cheese a little from the sides of the pan. Page 7.

Making a Cheese Basket: The Middle Will Begin to Tan
Making a Cheese Basket: The Middle Will Begin to Tan. Don't let it brown! Page 8.

Making a Cheese Basket: Drape the Cheese
At this point, tip the skillet so the cheese flows out -- it will come as a sheet -- and drape it, browned side up, over a bowl or cup. Mirko used a round straight-sided cup 2 inches (5 cm) in diameter and about the same high, but you can use any shape you want. The sheet will set in about 15 seconds, at which point you can lift it off the cup. Page 9.

A Peposo Recipe - And then Salt
Salt is important; it flavors the Peposo and balances the pepper. Page 5.

A Peposo Recipe - Followed by Tomato Sauce
Tomato sauce is an addition to Peposo -- Don't go overboard. Page 6.

A Peposo Recipe - Stir...
Stir the pot and set it on the stove. Page 7.

A Peposo Recipe - Almost Done!
Two pots of Peposo, one cooked and the other just set on the stove. Page 8.

A Peposo Recipe - Peposo: Serve it With?
Peoposo is quite nice with boiled beans, or spinach, and will go well with either red wine or beer. Page 9.

A Peposo Recipe - Begin with Garlic
Peposo calls for quite a bit of garlic! Page 2.

A Peposo Recipe - Prepare the Meat
You'll want a cut that has some gristle, which will become gelatinous as it cooks, and contribute to the texture of the stew. Page 3.

A Peposo Recipe - Add the Pepper
Peposo's name is well deserved: it definitely packs a punch! Page 4.

Salting Anchovies The Ligurian Way
The anchovies must be quite fresh. One begins by beheading them. Page 2.

Salting Anchovies The Ligurian Way
A clean break will result in the clean curve of the mandibular arch shown here. Page 3.

Salting Anchovies The Ligurian Way
Layer the fish, orienting them all the same way. And then salt them. Page 4.

Salting Anchovies The Ligurian Way
After 40 days they're ready! Italian Food. Page 5.

Making a Sformato: The Molds, Buttered and Breadcrumbed
To make 10 muffin-sized sformati, or fill a 10-inch (25 cm) ring mold, you'll need:. Page 2.

Making a Sformato: Start Making the Batter
Making a Sformato: Start Making the Batter. Page 3.

Making a Sformato: Grate The Nutmeg
Making a Sformato: Grate The Nutmeg. Page 4.

Making a Sformato: Add the Eggs
Alessio called for 5 eggs when he drew up the recipe, but decided to use only 4 because they were quite large, and he finds that too much egg makes for a tougher sformato. Therefore he cracked in 4 eggs and mixed well. Page 5.

Making a Sformato: The Batter Is Ready
Making a Sformato: The Batter Is Ready. Page 6.

Making a Sformato: Fill the Molds
Making a Sformato: Fill the Molds. Page 7.

Making a Sformato: They're Done!
Making a Sformato: They're Done! Page 8.

Making a Sformato: Enjoy!
Sformato agli Spinaci: Enjoy! Italian Food. Page 9.

Roast Piglet: Buon Appetito!
Roast piglet, served with pan-roasted potatoes. Page 10.

A Gutted Piglet
When roasting a piglet, you begin the day before, marinating it. Page 2.

Make Cuts in the Rind
While the fire heats the oven, prepare the piglet and set it in the roasting pan. Page 3.

Next? Into the Oven!
The oven is hot and the piglet ready: The roasting begins. Page 4.

Patience...
At this point the pig roasts, and you're free to do other things. Page 5.

Roasting a Piglet: Add the Potatoes
After about 2 1/2 hours, add peeled cubed potatoes to the roasting pan and return the pan to the oven. Page 6.

The Roasted Piglet: Begin Carving
Start by removing the head. Italian Food. Page 7.

Carving the Piglet: Split It Lengthwise
After removing the head, cut the piglet lengthwise. Page 8.

Carving a Piglet: Cut It Into Portions
Cut the piglet into portions. Italian Food. Page 9.

Making Zuccotto: Make The Cake
You can used commercially prepared sponge cake to make a zuccotto. Or you can follow Alessio's lead and make sponge cake to start off. Page 2.

Making Zuccotto: Cut Strips of Cake
Cut strips of cake with which to line the bowl. Page 3.

Making Zuccotto: Line the Bowl
Line the bowl with strips of cake. Page 4.

Making Zuccotto: Make the Filling and Fill the Bowl
Next, make the filling for the zuccotto and fill the bowl. Page 5.

Making Zuccotto: Brush the Zuccotto
Before serving the zuccotto, brush it with syrup. Page 6.

Making Zuccotto: Slice It
Slice the Zuccotto. Italian Food. Page 7.

Making Zuccotto: Plate the Slices
Plate the Slices. Italian Food. Page 8.

Making Zuccotto: Ready!
A little decoration, and enjoy! Italian Food. Page 9.

Making Panzanella: Enjoy!
Making Panzanella: Enjoy! Italian Food. Page 10.

Making Panzanella: The Ingredients for Panzanella
Making Panzanella: The Ingredients for Panzanella. Page 2.

Making Panzanella: Acidulate the Water
Making Panzanella: Acidulate the Water. Page 3.

Making Panzanella: Slice the Bread
Making Panzanella: Slice the Bread. Page 4.

Making Panzanella: Soak the Bread
Making Panzanella: Soak the Bread. Page 5.

Making Panzanella: Squeeze the Bread
Making Panzanella: Squeeze the Bread. Page 6.

Making Panzanella: The Proper Texture
Making Panzanella: The Proper Texture. Page 7.

Making Panzanella: The Panzanella is almost ready...
Making Panzanella: The Panzanella is almost ready... Page 8.

Making Panzanella: Mix Well...
Making Panzanella: Mix Well... Italian Food. Page 9.

Sew up the Chicken
When you have finished stuffing the chicken, sew it shut. Page 6.

Bag the Chicken
To keep the chicken from falling apart as it cooks, put it into a mesh bag. Page 7.

Cook the Chicken
You can either roast or boil your stuffed chicken. In this case I prefer to boil it. Page 8.

Buon Appetito!
When the chicken is done, slice it and arrange it on a platter. The stock left in the pot will be an excellent broth. Page 9.

When you come to the legs, dislocate the hips
When you come to the legs, dislocate the hips: this makes it easier to cut through them. Page 10.

Cut the Wing Tips
The first step to boning a bird is trimming the wing tips. Page 2.

Work the skin back to the shoulders
After you have removed the wing tips, it's time to take care of the shoulders. Page 3.

Cut through the shoulder joint.
After exposing the shoulder, cut through the joint to separate the wing bones from the carcass. Page 4.

Scrape the meat from the bones
After you have freed the wing bones, scrape and trim the meat from them using the knife. Page 5.

Pull the bone out and cut it free
Remove the wing bones by pulling them out and cutting them free. Page 6.

Pull the skin a little further back over the breast, to expose the wishbone
Pull the skin back over the breast until the wishbone area is exposed. Page 7.

Cut the Wishbone Free
Cut the wishbone free and add it to the stock pile. Page 8.

Trim the meat from the carcass
You are now ready to trim the meat from the carcass. Page 9.

Preparing the Stuffing: Grind the Meat
Italian poultry stuffings tend to be meat-based. SO you start by grinding the meat. Page 2.

Add the other ingredients and mix well
Use herbs and spices to give your stuffing a special touch. Page 3.

Prepare the Chicken
To keep the stuffing from leaking, sew the neck hole shut. Page 4.

Stuff the chicken.
Stuffing the chicken is easy. Do press the stuffing down, however. Page 5.

Biscotti Served The Traditional Way, With Vinsanto
And at home? The younger generation's new biscotti are popular in Italy too. However, mention the word biscotto, and most Italians will still think of Antonio Mattei's traditional Biscotto di Prato, in its characteristic blue bag, and pour a drop of Vinsanto, the traditional Tuscan dessert wine to go with it. Page 10.

Checking the Biscotti
The freshly sliced biscotti are checked, and those that aren't perfect are removed. Though the word biscotto means twice cooked, Francesco says theirs are small enough that a second passage through the oven is not necessary. Page 7.

Bagging The Biscotti
The packaging is done by hand: the bags are folded over and then tied. Page 8.

Bags of Biscotti
Blue is an uncommon color for food packaging, and this may be why Antonio decided upon it when he began selling his biscotti -- people notice it, and it stands out. And it still does today: The Biscottificio Mattei ships its Biscotti all over the world. Page 9.

Making Focaccia: Spread the Dough
Oil your pan and spread the dough to a bit less than a half-inch thickness. Page 2.

Continue Spreading and Pulling the Dough
Spread and pull the focaccia dough with your to fill the pan. Don't roll it or the texture will suffer. Page 3.

Dimple the Dough
Focaccia has a dimpled surface. Italian Food. Page 4.

The Dimpler, Close Up
The dimpler with which to dimple a focaccia. One can also use this tool to remove spaghetti from boiling water. Page 5.

Making Focaccia: Toppings
The simplest focaccia topping is olive oil and coarse salt. But you can top a focaccia with many other things. Page 6.

Baking the Focaccia
Italians bake focaccia in a hot oven. Very hot, even; this bread oven was probably above 500 F. Page 7.

Want a Focaccetta?
Focaccette are perfect picnic foods: They split easily, and you can fill them with all sorts of tasty morsels. Page 10.

Making Panigacci and Focaccette: Preparing the Dough
Making panigaccio or focaccetta dough is easy: Simply combine water, flour, cornmeal, and a pinch of salt. No yeast. Page 2.

Making Panigacci and Focaccette: The Dough is Ready
Add water to the flour mixture, and knead. Page 3.

Making Panigacci and Focaccette: Heat the Testine
Panigacci are cooked un hot unglazed terracotta plates, which are stacked to better distribute the heat. The first step is to heat the testine. Page 4.

Making Panigacci and Focaccette: The Testine are Hot
Byt the time the fire burns down the testine will be quite hot. Page 5.

Making Panigacci and Focaccette: Arrange the Hot Testine On a Rack
Remove the testine from the fire using a long set of tongs and put them on a rack. Page 6.

Making Panigacci and Focaccette: It's Time to Bake!
Panigacci are baked between terracotta plates, on the hearth. Simple cooking at its simplest. Page 7.

Making Panigacci and Focaccette: They're Cooked!
When you remove the disk of cooked dough from the testina, you have a panigaccio. The next step is to transform it into a focaccetta. Page 8.

Making Panigacci and Focaccette: To Puff up a Panigaccio
Simple: Return it to the fire. Italian Food. Page 9.

What It Takes to Make Biscotti
Antonio Mattei used simple ingredients for his biscotti: Flour, eggs, sugar, almonds, and pine nuts. Here we also have Artusi's Recipe. Page 2.

Pulling the Dough Sticks to the Proper Length
Now that we've quickly discussed Biscotti, a look at how they're made in Antonio Mattei's shop. They begin by mixing the ingredients to make the dough, shape the dough into logs (for want of a better term), and then use a machine to shape the logs into snakes and put them on the baking sheets; the dough snakes are then pulled to the proper length by hand. Page 3.

The Snakes of Dough are Brushed With Egg
Prior to being baked, the snakes of dough are brushed with egg yolk. Page 4.

Baked Biscotti di Prato
The biscotti emerge from the oven nicely browned and smelling wonderfully of almonds. They cool briefly as they move along the conveyor... Page 5.

Slicing the Biscotti
Biscotti are, of course, sliced, and the next step, after the bars have cooled some, is to put them into a slicer that cuts them up. It's important not to wait too long before cutting the bars, says Francesco, because they become brittle as they cool, and if they're cold shatter rather than cut properly. Page 6.

Capocollo or Coppa
Capocollo, or Coppa, part of a platter of mixed cold cuts, or affettati misti. Page 2.

Mortadella di Bologna
Mortadella is also known as mortadella di Bologna, from whence the name of its American offshoot, Bologna. Mortadella di Bologna is a cooked pork sausage made from pork ground fine in a mortar (hence the Italian name) with spices and cubes of fat. Page 3.

Pancetta Arrotolata
Pancetta is made from a cut called pork side, which is what remains after the loin and spare ribs are removed. This is the same cut used to make bacon, though pancetta is simply cured with salt, spices, and herbs -- no heat, no smoking, and none of the sugar that often goes into bacon. Page 4.

Prosciutto
People have written books about Northern Italy's cured raw hams. Broadly speaking, prosciutto can be divided into two categories: dolce (sweet), and salato, casalingo, or Toscano (salty, home made, or Tuscan). The former is more refined and more expensive, while the latter is more flavorful. Page 5.

Salame
A Salame (plural salami, while cold cuts in general are called salumi -- note the u) is a cured sausage generally made by grinding lean pork with pork fat to make a paste, and stuffing the paste into a casing, generally pig's intestine. Page 6.

Carciofi Sott'Olio, Pickled Artichokes
Pickled artichokes are one of the standard elements in an mixed vegetable antipasto. Page 2.

Funghi Trifolati - Stewed Mushrooms
Antipasti are seasonal, and in the fall you may well find tasty stewed wild mushrooms. Page 3.

Pomodori Secchi - Sun-Dried Tomatoes
Sun-dried tomatoes are more of a southern thing in Italy, in part because the southern climate is more conducive to growing tomatoes, and in part because the tremendous volume of tomatoes produced in the south leads naturally to drying some of them. They are a wonderful addition to an antipasto platter. Page 4.

Cipolline Sotto Aceto - Pickled Button Onions
Pickled button onions add a zesty touch to a platter of mixed antipasti, and are very nice with bland foods too. Page 5.

Giardiniera - A Pickled Vegetable Medley
Giardiniera, a medley of pickled vegetables, is the one thing you can be almost certain of finding in an Italian antipasto misto. Page 6.

Salt Roasting? Preparing Salt Roasted Pork Loin
Since pork loin is lean, you will need to lardon it before putting it in the pan on a bed of salt. Page 2.

Salt Roasting? Covering The Pork Loin With Salt
Cover the loin to an even depth of 3/4 inch (2 cm), using as much of the remaining salt as necessary. Page 3.

Salt Roasting? The Pork Loin Is Done!
Roast the pork loin for an hour and 15 minutes. While it is roasting, squeeze the lemon, collecting the juice in a bowl. Peel and grate the apple, stirring the apple into the lemon juice immediately to keep it from discoloring. Stir in the grated horseradish too, and next lightly whip the cream. Fold it into the sauce too, cover the sauce with plastic wrap, and refrigerate it. Page 4.

Salt Roasting? Break the Crust Over the Pork Loin
The salt crust will be browned, and may even look burnt because of the reaction between the heat and the juices drawn from the meat. Don't worry, but rather crack it open, remove the pieces of crust, and brush away excess salt. Page 5.

Salt Roasting? Slice the Salt-Roasted Pork Loin
And here we have it. Buon Appetito! Page 6.

Selecting a Fish: Look it in the Eye
look the fish in the eyes. They should look back. Page 2.

Fish with slightly cloudy eyes can be good, but must be approached with care
Fish with slightly cloudy eyes can be good, but must be approached with care. Page 3.

Check the gills. They should be bright red.
A fresh fish has bright red gills. Page 4.

Determining the Cooking Time of a Fish
Determining the Cooking Time of a Fish. Page 5.

Stefano Frassineti's Pappardelle with Rabbit Sauce, For an Artusian Dinner
Stefano Frassineti's Pappardelle with Rabbit Sauce, For an Artusian Dinner. Page 23.

An Antipasto Misto, at the Ristorante Agnoletti in San Godenzo
An Antipasto Misto, at the Ristorante Agnoletti in San Godenzo. Page 3.

Freshly Made Giardiniera, at the Ristorante Agnoletti in San Godenzo
Freshly Made Giardiniera, at the Ristorante Agnoletti in San Godenzo. Page 2.

Frittelle di Riso at the Ristorante Agnoletti in San Godenzo
Frittelle di Riso at the Ristorante Agnoletti in San Godenzo. Page 10.

The Pulpit of the Abbey in San Godenzo
The Pulpit of the Abbey in San Godenzo. Page 11.

Pellegrino Artusi's Baccalà Montebianco, For an Artusian Dinner
Pellegrino Artusi's Baccalà Montebianco, For an Artusian Dinner. Page 2.

Pellegrino Artusi's Pappardelle with Rabbit Sauce, For an Artusian Dinner
Pellegrino Artusi's Pappardelle with Rabbit Sauce, For an Artusian Dinner. Page 4.

Pellegrino Artusi's Passatelli, For an Artusian Dinner
Pellegrino Artusi's Passatelli, For an Artusian Dinner. Page 3.

Pellegrino Artusi's Pasticcio di Lepre
Pellegrino Artusi's Pasticcio di Lepre. Page 3.

Pellegrino Artusi's Cacimperio
Pellegrino Artusi's Cacimperio. Italian Food. Page 2.

Tagliatelle with Mushroom Sauce at the Ristorante Agnoletti in San Godenzo
Tagliatelle with Mushroom Sauce at the Ristorante Agnoletti in San Godenzo. Page 6.

Zuppa Inglese, at the Ristorante Agnoletti in San Godenzo
Zuppa Inglese, at the Ristorante Agnoletti in San Godenzo. Page 9.

Pellegrino Artusi's Roast Rabbit with Potatoes
Pellegrino Artusi's Roast Rabbit with Potatoes. Page 5.

Emma Agnoletti's Tortelli di Patate and Cannelloni
Emma Agnoletti's Tortelli di Patate, with meat sauce, and Cannelloni, with a cheese and spinach filling. Page 93.

Cono Pugliese, a Puglian Ice Cream Cone prepared by Al Fornello da Ricci in Puglia
Cono Pugliese, a Puglian Ice Cream Cone prepared by Al Fornello da Ricci in Puglia. Page 95.

Roast Beef and Salad, at the Masseria Le Fabbriche in Puglia
Roast Beef and Salad, at the Masseria Le Fabbriche in Puglia. Page 96.

Zucchini and Zucchini Blossoms: Two For One!
Zucchini and Zucchini Blossoms: Two For One! Page 97.

Spiedini! Ready to Cook
Spiedini! Ready to Cook. Italian Food. Page 99.

A portrait of Pellegrino Artusi
A portrait of Pellegrino Artusi. Italian Food. Page 89.

Bollito Misto, At the Ristorante al Calmiere
Bollito Misto, At the Ristorante al Calmiere. Page 86.

Cenci, lattughe, bugie... Tasty Carnival pastries!
Cenci, lattughe, bugie... Tasty Carnival pastries! Page 79.

Fish Grilling in a Trattoria in Lazise, on Lake Garda
Fish Grilling in a Trattoria in Lazise, on Lake Garda. Page 81.

Radicchio Variegato di Castelfranco
Radicchio Variegato di Castelfranco. Page 83.

La Gricia, The ancestor of the Amatriciana Sauce
La Gricia, The ancestor of the Amatriciana Sauce. Page 84.

A Beautifully Decorated Jam Crostata
A Beautifully Decorated Jam Crostata. Page 85.

Baccelli, Fresh Fava Beans: Perfect with Pecorino!
Baccelli, Fresh Fava Beans: Perfect with Pecorino! Page 88.

Lamb, Ready for Easter
Lamb, Ready for Easter. Italian Food. Page 87.

Anchovies with Bagnet Vert, at Il Torchio in Dogliani
Anchovies with Bagnet Vert, at Il Torchio in Dogliani. Page 91.

Tomatoes and Cheese: Summer Refreshment!
Tomatoes and Cheese: Summer Refreshment! Page 90.

A Spectacular Fresh Fruit Crostata, made by Simone Ciattini of La Baracchina
A Spectacular Fresh Fruit Crostata, made by Simone Ciattini of La Baracchina. Page 92.

Freshly Made Giardiniera, at the Ristorante Agnoletti in San Godenzo
Freshly Made Giardiniera, at the Ristorante Agnoletti in San Godenzo. Page 94.

Panzanella, Prepared by Simone Ciattini of the Trattoria La Baracchina
Panzanella, Prepared by Simone Ciattini of the Trattoria La Baracchina. Page 98.

A Cotechino and a Zampone
A Cotechino and a Zampone. Italian Food. Page 71.

A Fish Stand in November, with Grouper, Shrimp, Mullet & More
A Fish Stand in November, with Grouper, Shrimp, Mullet & More. Page 64.

Castagne: Chestnuts
Castagne: Chestnuts. Italian Food. Page 66.

Impruneta's Peposo: A Fiery Tuscan Stew
Impruneta's Peposo: A Fiery Tuscan Stew. Page 65.

Lasagne Alla Bolognese
Lasagne Alla Bolognese. Italian Food. Page 69.

Lo Spiedo Bresciano: Roasting on the Spit...
Lo Spiedo Bresciano: Roasting on the Spit... Page 70.

Olive oil, in a terracotta Orcia
Olive oil, in a terracotta Orcia. Page 67.

Pomegranates and more in Rome's Campo dei Fiori Market
Pomegranates and more in Rome's Campo dei Fiori Market. Page 72.

Roasted Rosticciana -- Tuscan Spare Ribs -- and Potatoes
Roasted Rosticciana -- Tuscan Spare Ribs -- and Potatoes. Page 73.

Cannoli Siciliani, a Carnival Treat
Cannoli Siciliani, a Carnival Treat. Page 74.

That's... Chocolate?
That's... Chocolate? Italian Food. Page 75.

Amarone in the Making at the Azienda Bignele in Valpolicella
Amarone in the Making at the Azienda Bignele in Valpolicella. Page 76.

Fresh Ricotta!
Fresh Ricotta! Italian Food. Page 77.

Scorzette al Cioccolato, Chocolate Covered Candied Orange Peel
Scorzette al Cioccolato, Chocolate Covered Candied Orange Peel. Page 78.

Broccolo Romanesco
Broccolo Romanesco. Italian Food. Page 80.

The Battuto, or Herb mix behind many Italian dishes
The Battuto, or Herb mix behind many Italian dishes. Page 82.

Basilico: Fresh Basil
Basilico: Fresh Basil. Italian Food. Page 52.

At the Consorzio Produttori Vini Maestri in Primitivo
At the Consorzio Produttori Vini Maestri in Primitivo Page 58.

Finocchio, Bulb Fennel
Finocchio, Bulb Fennel. Italian Food. Page 57.

Impruneta's Peposo: A Fiery Tuscan Stew
Impruneta's Peposo: A Fiery Tuscan Stew. Page 59.

Panna Cotta
Panna Cotta. Italian Food. Page 56.

Piadine: Ready to Serve. Enjoy!
Piadine: Ready to Serve. Enjoy! Italian Food. Page 53.

Polenta Con Gli Osei
Polenta Con Gli Osei. Italian Food. Page 61.

Pomodori San Marzano: Neapolitan plum tomatoes
Pomodori San Marzano: Neapolitan plum tomatoes. Page 51.

Porchetta: The Head
Porchetta: The Head. Italian Food. Page 62.

Provolone Scolpito, A Provolone Horse
Provolone Scolpito, A Provolone Horse. Page 63.

Risotto allo Zafferano, or Risotto alla Milanese
Risotto allo Zafferano, or Risotto alla Milanese. Page 60.

Soaking Baccalà
Soaking Baccalà. Italian Food. Page 68.

Spaghetti alle Vongole, With Clams
Spaghetti alle Vongole, With Clams. Page 55.

Tris di Sughi
Tris di Sughi. Italian Food. Page 54.

A thick fiorentina, on the grill
A thick fiorentina, on the grill. Page 48.

Aglio e Peperoncino: Garlic and Hot Peppers
Aglio e Peperoncino: Garlic and Hot Peppers. Page 40.

An Antipasto Misto Toscano with Cold Cuts, Crostini & Pecorino Toscano Cheese
An Antipasto Misto Toscano with Cold Cuts, Crostini & Pecorino Toscano Cheese. Page 37.

Baby Zucchini, with Blossoms
Baby Zucchini, with Blossoms. Italian Food. Page 49.

Basilico: Fresh Basil
Basilico: Fresh Basil. Italian Food. Page 41.

Giving Time Its Due: Barrel Aging at Isole e Olena
Giving Time Its Due: Barrel Aging at Isole e Olena, in Chianti Classico Page 36.

Immigrant Chicken: Add Potatoes
Immigrant Chicken: Add Potatoes. Italian Food. Page 46.

Lardo di Colonnata, on display in a shop in Colonnata
Lardo di Colonnata, on display in a shop in Colonnata. Page 35.

Melone e Prosciutto, Cantaloupe with Prosciutto
Melone e Prosciutto, Cantaloupe with Prosciutto. Page 42.

Peperoni Verdi, Green Bell Peppers
Peperoni Verdi, Green Bell Peppers. Page 47.

Piero, of Verona's Il Calmiere, Serving Bollito Misto
Piero, of Verona's Il Calmiere, Serving Bollito Misto. Page 38.

Pizza Vera Napoli, With Anchovies & More
Pizza Vera Napoli, With Anchovies & More, From Florence's Pizzaria Cotta a Puntino. Page 43.

Risotto alla Marinara: Enjoy!
Risotto alla Marinara: Enjoy! Italian Food. Page 39.

Salvia Fritta, Fried Sage
Salvia Fritta, Fried Sage. Italian Food. Page 45.

Zucchini Frittata
Zucchini Frittata. Italian Food. Page 44.

Italian Food
Italian Food. Page 25.

An Antipasto Misto: Focaccia Integrale, Caciocavallo and Salamino
An Antipasto Misto: Focaccia Integrale, Caciocavallo and Salamino. Page 34.

Bicerin, Torino's Winter Pick-Me-Up
Bicerin, Torino's Winter Pick-Me-Up. Page 20.

Cavolo Cappuccio Bianco: White Cabbage
Cavolo Cappuccio Bianco: White Cabbage. Page 24.

Cavolo Nero: Black Leaf Kale
Cavolo Nero: Black Leaf Kale. Italian Food. Page 27.

Fagioli All'Uccelletto, Tomatoey Tuscan Beans with Sausages
Fagioli All'Uccelletto, Tomatoey Tuscan Beans with Sausages. Page 23.

Fesa di Tacchino: Turkey Breast
Fesa di Tacchino: Turkey Breast. Italian Food. Page 30.

Fesa di Tacchino: Turkey Breast
Fesa di Tacchino: Turkey Breast. Italian Food. Page 22.

Polenta, Cooking in a Copper Paiolo
Polenta, Cooking in a Copper Paiolo. Page 29.

Risotto al Tastasal
Risotto al Tastasal. Italian Food. Page 31.

Risotto al Vino Rosso Con Radicchio, Red Wine Risotto With Radicchio
Risotto al Vino Rosso Con Radicchio, Red Wine Risotto With Radicchio. Page 26.

Roast Veal Shank: The Ingredients
Roast Veal Shank: The Ingredients. Page 21.

Sicilian Salted Sardines, Seen at Florence's Taste Show
Sicilian Salted Sardines, Seen at Florence's Taste Show. Page 33.

Tagliatelle Paglia e Fieno
Tagliatelle Paglia e Fieno. Italian Food. Page 32.

Triglia di Scoglio: Striped Red Mullet, or Reef Mullet
Triglia di Scoglio: Striped Red Mullet, or Reef Mullet. Page 28.

Antonio Mattei's Biscotti: Cut Up
Antonio Mattei's Biscotti: Cut Up. Page 6.

A Fresh Porcino Mushroom
A Fresh Porcino Mushroom. Italian Food. Page 8.

Pasta e Ceci
Pasta e Ceci. Italian Food. Page 9.

Zucca Gialla: Yellow Squash
Zucca Gialla: Yellow Squash. Italian Food. Page 7.

Arista, or Pork Loin, With the Bones
Arista, or Pork Loin, With the Bones. Page 11.

Cavolfiore, Cauliflower
Cavolfiore, Cauliflower. Italian Food. Page 16.

Cavolo Cappuccio Bianco: White Cabbage
Cavolo Cappuccio Bianco: White Cabbage. Page 10.

Fave e Cicoria, Fava Bean Puree and Wild Chicory
Fave e Cicoria, Fava Bean Puree and Wild Chicory. Page 17.

Lo Spiedo Bresciano: Roasting on the Spit...
Lo Spiedo Bresciano: Roasting on the Spit... Page 18.

Making Crespelle: Done!
Making Crespelle: Done! Italian Food. Page 19.

Orata: Gilthead Seabream
Orata: Gilthead Seabream. Italian Food. Page 14.

Pera (or Mela) Cotogna
Pera (or Mela) Cotogna. Italian Food. Page 13.

A Traditional Olive Press: Into the Grinder
A Traditional Olive Press: Into the Grinder. Page 12.

Una Forma di Parmigiano: A Whole Parmigiano
Una Forma di Parmigiano: A Whole Parmigiano. Page 15.

Bistecca alla Fiorentina, Grilling to Perfection
Bistecca alla Fiorentina, Grilling to Perfection. Page 3.

Making Facaccia: In the Oven
Making Facaccia: In the Oven. Italian Food. Page 2.

Mixed Grilled Vegetables
Mixed Grilled Vegetables. Italian Food. Page 4.

Zuppa Inglese, English Trifle
Zuppa Inglese, English Trifle. Italian Food. Page 5.

Misto Sugo: The Beginnings of Fish Sauce for Pasta or Rice
Misto Sugo: The Beginnings of Fish Sauce for Pasta or Rice. Page 50.

Porchetta Panini, Ready to Go!
Porchetta Panini, Ready to Go! Italian Food. Page 6.

A Larger Nasello: A Larger European Hake
Nasello, European hake, comes in a considerable variety of sizes, and while some are best suted to being cooked whole, larger ones -- this, for example -- will yield very nice fillets. Page 33.

Cefalo, or Muggine: Gray Mullet
Mullet are coastal fish, and a number of closely related species swim the Mediterranean, inhabiting sea, estuaries, and even coastal lakes. They eat organic matter, says Alan Davidson, who notes that exactly what organic matter a given mullet has eaten (for example bottom muds or free-floating algae) is important, because said organic matter will affect its flavor. In other words, it's a fish to buy from a trusted fishmonger, but not from a huge market with many suppliers. Page 19.

Occhiata: Saddled Bream
Thanks to their large eyes and the dark band bordered by white at the juncture between body and tail, saddled bream are easy to recognize. And good, too, especially in the spring. According to Alan Davidson, their best end is on the grill. Page 34.

Paganello: Bronze Bream
The bronze bream closely resembles the Pandora, but is slightly drier, and therefore not as well suited to the grill unless it is previously marinated for a couple of hours in a mixture of olive oil and chopped herbs, for example rosemary and sage. Page 38.

Filetti di Pesce Persico, or Perch Fillets
Filetti di Pesce Persico, or Perch Fillets. Page 40.

Spatola, or Pesce Sciabola: Scabbard Fish
Spatola, or Pesce Sciabola: Scabbard Fish. Page 41.

Razza Quattrocchi: Ray
Razza Quattrocchi: Ray. Italian Food. Page 45.

Ricciola: Amberjack
Younger specimens of the amberjack can show vertical stripes, though none of those Alessandro Montini eagerly pointed out to me, saying

Salpa: Salema
Thanks to its brilliant yellow stripes the salema is quite distinctive. They live in stands of algae, which are also one of their preferred foods, and are of varying quality depending upon what else they eat in addition to algae and the time of year. Page 50.

Anguilla: Eel
Anguilla: Eel is quite fatty as fish go, but if cooked in a way that drains the fat from the fish quite delicately flavored. Wild eel are caught from late summer though autumn, whereas eel farmers time their catch to coincide with Christmas, when eel is in great demand for the Vigil dinner. Page 7.

Capitone: Eel
Capitone: Eel is quite fatty as fish go, but if cooked in a way that drains the fat from the fish quite delicately flavored. Wild eel are caught from late summer though autumn, whereas eel farmers time their catch to coincide with Christmas, when eel is in great demand for the Vigil dinner. Page 16.

Cernia, or Dusky Grouper: A Smaller Grouper
Groupers can be quite large, and even smaller ones such as this tend to stand out in the fish market because of their their livery. And well they might; they're also quite tasty, with relatively few bones to cause problems. Groupers like this one, found in the Pescheria Ultima Spiaggia in Florence's Mercato di San Lorenzo, are quite nice grilled, baked, or poached. Got a smaller grouper? You might want to try Crouper with Bell Peppers:. Page 21.

Bottarga di Muggine, Salted Mullet Roe
Bottarga di Muggine, Salted Mullet Roe. Page 11.

Bottarga di Tonno, Salted Tuna Roe
Bottarga di Tonno, Salted Tuna Roe. Page 12.

Acciughe, Fresh Anchovies
Acciughe, Fresh Anchovies, are very common, and though much of the catch is salted or canned, they are also good fresh. And inexpensive, too! Page 4.

Aguglie, Gar-fish, or Needle Fish
Aguglie, Garfish, or Needle Fish: an unusual, very tasty fish, and a recipe for grilled gar-fish with a tasty lemony sauce. Page 5.

Alici, or Anchovies
Alici, or Anchovies, and an anchovy frittata. Page 6.

Baccalà: Salt Cod
Baccalà, salt cod, for sale in Florence, and a recipe for baked baccalà. Page 8.

Bagiggi: A local name for some sort of small fry
Bagiggi: A local name for some sort of small fry, and how to fry them. Page 9.

Boghe, or Bogues, and a tomato sauce for them.
Boghe, or Bogues, and a tomato sauce for them. Page 10.

Branzino, European Sea Bass
Branzino, or European Sea Bass. In England it's simply called bass. Also, a recipe for Filetti Di Branzino in Crosta di Patate - Sea Bass Fillets in a Mashed Potato Crust. Page 13.

Calamari, or Common Squids, and a recipe for squid stewed with artichokes
Calamari, or Common Squid, and a recipe for stewed squid with artichokes. Page 14.

Canocchie, or Mantis Shrimp
Canocchie, or mantis shrimp. In many parts of Italy they're called Panocchie. Also, a simple canocchia or mantis shrimp antipasto. Page 15.

Cappesanta, or Pilgrim Scallop
Cappesanta, or Pilgrim Scallop: The classic bivalves, the shells that the petroleum people took as their symbol, are quite good, and versatile too. Here they are closed, and the recipe os for baked scallops. Page 17.

Cappesante, or Mediterranean Scallops, opened at the market, and a recipe for grilled scallops
Cappesante, or Mediterranean Scallops, opened at the market, and a recipe for grilled scallops. Page 18.

Cernia, or Dusky Grouper, and baked grouper with potatoes.
Cernia, or Dusky Grouper, and baked grouper with potatoes. Page 20.

Coda di Rospo or Rana Pescatrice, in English Anglerfish, monkfish, or goosefish (a North American cousin). Seen from above.
Coda di Rospo or Rana Pescatrice, in English Anglerfish, monkfish, or goosefish (a North American cousin). Seen from above. Also, a recipe for Anglerfish medallions in wine. Page 22.

Coda di Rospo or Rana Pescatrice, in English Anglerfish, monkfish, or goosefish. Skinned and ready for sale.
Coda di Rospo or Rana Pescatrice, in English Anglerfish, monkfish, or goosefish. Skinned and ready for sale, and a recipe for Anglerfish alla Cacciatora. Page 23.

Cozze, Mitili, or Muscoli: Mussels, and a recipe for breaded mussels
Cozze, Mitili, or Muscoli: Mussels, and a recipe for breaded mussels. Page 24.

Dentice, or Common Dentex, and a Dentex Risotto
Dentice, or Common Dentex, and a Dentice Risotto, or Risotto al Dentice. Page 25.

Filetti di Salmone: Salmon Filets
Filetti di Salmone: Salmon Filets, and a recipe for Salmon Filet with Champagne. Page 49.

Gamberoni, or Jumbo Prawns
Gamberoni, Jumbo Prawns, or large Red Shrimp, and a recipe for roasted prawns. Page 26.

Mazzancolle or Spannocchie: Caramote Prawns or Triple-Grooved Shrimp
Mazzancolle: Caramote Prawns or Triple-Grooved Shrimp, and a recipe for sauteed prawns. Page 27.

Mazzole, Capone Gallinella, or Gallinella: Tub Gurnard or Tub Fish
Mazzole, Capone Gallinella, or Gallinella: Tub Gurnard or Tub Fish, and a recipe for Tub Gurnard with Tomatoes and Capers, or Capone con Pomodori e Capperi. Page 28.

Merlani, also known as Moletti: Whiting
Merlani, also known as Moletti: Whiting, and Whiting Palermo Style, or Merlani alla Palermitana, a tasty baked fish recipe for them. Page 29.

Misto Sugo: The Beginnings of Fish Sauce for Pasta or Rice
Misto Sugo: The Beginnings of Fish Sauce for Pasta or Rice. Page 30.

Mormora or Pagro: Striped Sea Bream or Red Porgy
Mormora or Pagro: Striped Sea Bream or Red Porgy, and a recipe for mormora baked in a packet. Page 31.

Naselli: European Hake
Naselli: European Hake, and a simple recipe for Nasello in Agrodolce, chilled marinated sweet-and-sour hake. Page 32.

Ombrina: Shi Drum
Ombrina: Shi Drum, and a recipe for ombrina with sundried tomatoes. Page 35.

Orata: Gilthead Seabream
Orata: Gilthead Seabream, and a recipe from Bari, for sea bream with raisins. Page 36.

Ostriche: Oysters
Ostriche: Oysters, and a recipe for baked oysters Taranto Style. Page 37.

Parago, Pagello, or Fragolino: Pandora
Parago, Pagello, or Fragolino: Pandora, and a recipe for baked fish with olives. Page 39.

Pesce San Pietro: John Dory
Pesce San Pietro: John Dory, and a recipe for John Dory fillets in Marsala. Page 42.

Polpetto: A Little Octopus
Polpetto: A Little Octopus, and a recipe for whole small octopus simmered in tomato sauce. Page 44.

Polpo: Octopus. These are medium-sized, about 16-18 inches long (30-40 cm).
Polpo: Octopus. These aremedium-sized, about 16-18 inches long (30-40 cm), and a stewed octopus reicpe. Page 43.

Rombo Chiodato: Turbot
Rombo Chiodato: Turbot, and a recipe for turbot stewed with tomatoes: Turbot in Guazzetto, or Rombo in Guazzetto. Page 47.

Salmone: Salmon
Salmone: Salmon, and a recipe for salmone in crosta, in a pastry crust. Page 48.

Saraghina: European Sprat
Saraghina: European Sprat, and a recipe for Stuffed Sprat, Saraghine Ripiene. Page 51.

Scorfano - Scorpion Fish
Scorfano, or Scorpionfish, and a tasty recipe for stewed scorpion fish. Page 55.

Stoccafisso: Stock Fish, or Dried Cod
Stoccafisso: Stock Fish, or Dried Cod. Page 60.

Suro: Scad, or Horse Mackerel
Suro: Scad, or Horse Mackerel. Italian Food. Page 62.

Common Techniques for Cooking Fish
When you buy fish, make sure the gills are red. Also, a quick rundown of common techniques for cooking fish. Page 3.

Pesce Spada: A Swordfish Head
Pesce Spada: A Swordfish Head. Italian Food. Page 2.

Sarde: Sardines
Sarde: Sardines, and a recipe for Gnocchi with Sardines, or Gnocchetti con le Sarde. Page 52.

Sarde Sfilettate: Filleted Sardines
Sarde Sfilettate: Filleted Sardines, and a chilled sardine antipasto. Page 53.

Scampi
Scampi, and a very simple Scampi on Ice recipe for them. Page 54.

Seppie: Cuttlefish
Seppie: Cuttlefish, and a recipe for grilled cuttlefish. Page 56.

Sgombero or Maccarello: Atlantic Mackerel
Sgombero or Maccarello: Atlantic Mackerel, and a recipe for pickled mackerel that will be a good antipasto or main course on a hot day. Page 57.

Sogliola: There are many closely related species; This is Adriatic Sole, laid out upside down by the fishmonger.
Sogliola: There are many closely related species; This is Adriatic Sole, laid out upside down by the fishmonger. Also, a recipe for sole with black olives. Page 58.

Spigola: European Seabass
Spigola: European Seabass, and a simple baked fish recipe. Page 61.

Totani, or Broadtail shortfin squid: The bodies, cut into rings for frying.
Totani, or Broadtail shortfin squid: The bodies, cut into rings for frying. Page 67.

Trancia di Pesce Spada: Swordfish Steaks
Trancia di Pesce Spada: Swordfish Steaks, and a simple Sicilian recipe for grilled swordfish steaks. Page 59.

Tombarello or Tonnetto: There are many kinds of small tunafish called tonnetti in Italian waters. These are Bullet Tuna.
Tombarello or Tonnetto: There are many kinds of small tunafish called tonnetti in Italian waters. These are Bullet Tuna. Also, a recipe for Sicilian stewed tuna, agghiotta di tonno. Page 63.

Tonno: Fresh Tuna Filets
Filetti di Tonno: Fresh Tuna Filets, and a recipe for Tunnu Ammuttanatu, zesty tuna with onions. Page 64.

Tonno: Fresh tuna ready to become tuna steaks
Trancia di Tonno: Fresh tuna ready to become tuna steaks, and a recipe for tuna with peperonata, stewed peppers. Page 65.

Totani: Broadtail Shortfin Squid, or Flying Squid
Totani: Broadtail Shortfin Squid, or Flying Squid, and a recipe for squid with potatoes. Page 66.

Triglia di Scoglio: Striped Red Mullet, or Reef Mullet
Triglia di Scoglio: Striped Red Mullet, or Reef Mullet, and a recipe for triglie alla livornese, mullet stewed with tomatoes. Page 68.

Trota: Lake Trout
Trota: Lake Trout, and a recipe for beaking them at the hearth. Page 69.

Vongole: Striped Venus Clams
Vongole: Striped Venus Clams. Italian Food. Page 70.

A bunch of grapes, carved into a pumpkin
A bunch of grapes, carved into a pumpkin. Page 2.

Grapefruit, Pineapples, Grapes and More
Grapefruit, Pineapples, Grapes and More. Page 7.

A Watermelon Basket, Filled With Grapes and Surrounded By Fruit
A Watermelon Basket, Filled With Grapes and Surrounded By Fruit. Page 8.

All Kinds Of Beautifully Arranged Fruit
All Kinds Of Beautifully Arranged Fruit. Page 9.

Cantaloupe in a Cantaloupe Basket
Cantaloupe in a Cantaloupe Basket. Page 11.

Grape and Strawberry Kebabs, or Spiedini
Grape and Strawberry Kebabs, or Spiedini. Page 12.

Grapes, Currants, and Berry Fruit
Grapes, Currants, and Berry Fruit. Page 16.

Strawberries, Papayas, and Carambola Stars
Strawberries, Papayas, and Carambola Stars. Page 13.

Strawberries in a Cantaloupe Basket
Strawberries in a Cantaloupe Basket. Page 10.

San Giovanni Valdarno's Carnival Dinner: Stufato Sangiovannese
San Giovanni Valdarno's Carnival Dinner: Stufato Sangiovannese. Page 11.

San Giovanni Valdarno's Carnival Dinner: The Antipasti
San Giovanni Valdarno's Carnival Dinner: The Antipasti. Page 8.

Monna Tancia: Alone with the baby
Monna Tancia: Alone with the baby. Page 4.

Monna Tancia: The Virgin Hears her Prayers
Monna Tancia: The Virgin hears her prayers, and gives her milk. Page 5.

Monna Tancia gives thanks
Monna Tancia gives thanks for her milk. Page 6.

San Giovanni Valdarno: The Basilica
San Giovanni Valdarno: The Basilica. Page 3.

San Giovanni Valdarno: More Carnival Masks
San Giovanni Valdarno: More Carnival Masks. Page 2.

Wine for the Carnival Dinner
Wine for the Carnival Dinner. Italian Food. Page 7.

Venezia, A Carnival Mask, and Cenci -- Wonderful Fritters
Venezia: A Carnival Mask, and a recipe for Cenci, Carnival fritters. Page 11.

Venezia: A Carnival Mask
Venezia: A Carnival Mask. Italian Food. Page 6.

Venezia: Bridge over a Canal
Venezia: Bridge over a Canal. Italian Food. Page 3.

Venezia: Piazza San Marco on Carnevale, and Zipulas, Sardinian Fritters
Venezia: Piazza San Marco on Carnevale, and a recipe for Zipulas, Sardinian Carnival fritters. Page 14.

Venezia: A Darkened Alley, and a Recipe for Grappa Spirals
Venezia: A Darkened Alley, and a Recipe for Grappa Spirals. Page 16.

Venezia: Fishermen heading out to the mussel grounds, and a recipe for Carnival Tortelli
Venezia: Fishermen heading out to the mussel grounds, and a recipe for Carnival Tortelli. Page 13.

Venezia: Ponte dei Sospiri, and Recipes for Frittelle
Il Ponte dei Sospiri, the bridge of sighs Venice's prisoners would cross after their sentencing, often going to their deaths. Also, a recipes for Carnival fritters. Page 12.

Venice: A Carnival Mask, and a Recipe for Vanilla-Laced Apple Fritters
Venice: A Carnival Mask, and a Recipe for Vanilla-Laced Apple Fritters. Page 18.

Venice: A Carnival Mask, and More About the Holiday
Venice: A Carnival Mask, and More About the Holiday. Page 19.

Venice: A Carnival Mask
Venice: A Carnival Mask. Italian Food. Page 5.

Venice: A Carnival Mask
Venice: A Carnival Mask. Italian Food. Page 2.

Venice: Carnival Masks, and a recipe for Chiacchere, Tasty Fritters
Venice: Carnival Masks, and a recipe for Chiacchere, Tasty Fritters. Page 17.

A Boat Hauled up for a Storm
A fishing boat, hauled up on the beach for a storm. Page 15.

Amarone in the Making!
Amarone, one of Italy's finest red wines, is made in the Valpolicella, the foothills above Verona, by drying the grapes and then pressing the raisins. Page 19.

Cassata Gigante
A huge cassata alla Siciliana -- 3 by 5 feet -- outlined with pasta reale and decorated with candied fruit by the the pastrymasters of Trapani's Antica Pasticceria Fiorino. Page 17.

Fishing Off The Coast In Puglia
Fishermen hauling their nets off the coast in Puglia. Page 13.

Grappa, Anyone?
The equipment used to distill grappa is quite beautiful. Page 11.

La Sicilia
A huge cassata alla Siciliana, decorated with the outline of Sicily in candied fruit, made by Trapani's Antica Pasticceria Fiorino. Page 9.

La Vacca Chianina
A Vacca Chianina, the classic white oxen that wander the Tuscan countryside. Page 3.

Making Grappa: A Distillation Column
A distillation column at the Distillerie Bonollo's greti di Greve in Chianti distillery. The plant is fascinating, and well worth a visit if you come to Tuscany. Page 14.

Pesca in Laguna
Fishermen, setting out into the winter fog in Venice's Lagoon. Page 10.

Sicilian Pasta Reale, Or Almond Paste, From Trapani
Pasta Reale sculptures made by Trapani's Antica Pasticceria Fiorino. Page 6.

The Harvest is In!
After bottling, the harvest comes to town. Page 4.

Under the Streets
Wine aging under the streets of Montepulciano, not far from Siena. It's a beautiful day trip from Florence. Page 20.

The Oxford Companion to Italian Food
This is one of the best books on Italian food and culture I have read, and will also make a wonderful gift come the holidays. But don't flip through it if you're buying it as a gift, unless you buy a second copy, because you'll find yourself keeping the first for yourself.

Italian Cuisine Truisms -- Are They or Not?
I got a note the other day saying

Ossibuchi al Sugo - Stewed Veal Shanks with Meat Sauce
The best known Italian recipe for Ossibuchi, veal shanks, is probably ossibuchi alla milanese, which are slowly cooked, and then seasoned with a heady mixture of chopped herbs just before going to the table. One can do other things with shanks as well. Stew them with ground beef, for example, and this recipe yields an extraordinarily satiny pasta sauce, and a superb main course as well. Winter comfort food of the highest order.

Impruneta's Peposo - An Illustrated Recipe - A Peposo Recipe
Peposo is Impruneta's signature stew, a zesty, peppery beef stew that can easily match any chili out there. And it's easy to make, too!

How to Bone a Chicken, Turkey, or Other Bird
Boning the bird is an important step in many recipes, and though butchers were quite willing to do it in the past, finding someone who will do it in a modern supermarket can be very difficult. Fortunately it's not too difficult. Unlike some techniques, which make a cut down the spine, this technique leaves the skin intact, making the bird much easier to stuff thereafter. The technique will work with chickens, ducks and turkeys.

How to Stuff and Cook a Boned Chicken
Cooking a chicken once you have boned it is easy: you simply prepare the stuffing, stuff the bird, and cook it. But as is true always, there are a few tricks.

How To Select A Fish and Estimate Its Cooking Time
There's nothing worse than overripe fish. Here's how to avoid it, and how to estimate how long you should cook what you buy.

How To Make Panigacci and Focaccette
Panigacci are a simple, quickly cooked flatbread typical of the Lunigiana region along the Tosco-Ligurian border. If you return them to the fire they puff up, and become focaccette. Hearth cooking at its finest!

Italian Thanksgiving Ideas
Italians don't have a Thanksgiving celebration per se, perhaps because the growing season never stops: Even in the midst of winter there's something to harvest, broccoli raab in the south, or kale and cabbage in the north. Of course Italians are happy to celebrate any holiday, and here are some ideas to add to a Thanksgiving meal should you celebrate the holiday.

How To Salt Anchovies The Ligurian Way
The summer anchovy harvest was vital to Ligurian fishermen, who salted much of the catch to carry them through less abundant times. Here is how they salted (and salt) their anchovies. It's not difficult, and the results are superb.

How to make a Spinach (or any other kind of) Sformato
A sformato is similar to a soufflé, but not as airy, and therefore doesn't require the care in preparation its French cousin does -- there's no danger that it will deflate. But a sformato is quite elegant, and also quite tasty, and therefore perfect for either a family meal or when company comes calling.

Making a Zuccotto - An Illustrated Recipe
A zuccotto is a delightful combination of cake and ice cream, that gains verve from just a slight drizzle of liqueur. It's quite refreshing, elegant, and perfect for a when company comes calling. This particular zuccotto has a saffron cream filling.

Making Panzanella: What is Panzanella?
Panzanella is a Tuscan summer bread salad: peasant food, and a way of making stale bread palatable when there was little else to go with it. Panzanella has become considerably richer since the end of the War, because people can now afford to add more of the other ingredients that support the bread, and it is an extremely popular summer dish.

La Cucina del Friuli Venezia Giulia
Friuli Venezia Giulia is quite distinct from much of the rest of Italy: It was an Austro-Hungarian province for many eyars, and as a result has many Mitteleuropean elements in the cuisine, including sauerkraut and strudel. But is is refined, and there's much to enjoy.

How to Make Focaccia - An Illustrated Recipe
Focaccia, or schiacciata, is a simple savory flatbread that's a fine change of pace from regular bread. It's also a wonderful base for a sandwich, and, when made with a topping, is one of the finest nibble-foods there is.