Italian Food Sitemap - Page 7 2016-09-26

A Visit to Prato's Biscottificio Mattei - Where Biscotti Began!
It's strange to think that the popularity of biscotti -- the flat twice-cooked almond cookies that have taken the world by storm in recent decades -- can be traced to one man, but it's true: In 1858 Antonio Mattei, a pastry chef who lived in the city of Prato, not far from Florence, opened a shop in what is now Via Ricasoli, and began to sell biscotti. They quickly attracted a following, and the rest is history...

A Tuscan Antipasto Misto: What's On The Plate
Tuscan festive meals usually start with a mixture of antipasti, consisting of cold cuts, crostini, and generally something else, either pickles or cheese or perhaps both, and perhaps a sauce or two. If you're in a home the antipasti will be presented in platters, which people pass about, picking and choosing. In a restaurant this is obviously less practical, and you will likely get a plate of antipasti like the one shown here.

Spicy Salt-Roasted Pork Loin, Illustrated
Since salt roasting draws moisture (and fat) from unprotected meats, you will need to lardon the loin with pancetta. The result is a delightfully moist pork roast, and a spicy horseradish sauce.

Boiling Potatoes? Save the Water!
When you boil potatoes you get starchy water, which can be quite useful.

Favorite 2004 Roero and Barbaresco
This spring I was invited to Alba Wines, the annual vintage presentation of Southern Piemonte's great Nebbiolo-based red wines, Barolo, Barbaresco, and Roero. Barolo was frankly difficult -- the 2003 vintage was not good -- but 2004 is a different story, and there are some very fine interpretations of Roero and Barbaresco that are by now reaching wineshops. Here is what impressed me the most, the Roero first and then the Barbaresco.

Ribolla Gialla: White Wines from Friuli Venezia Giulia
Ribolla Gialla is an ancient varietal from Friuli Venezia Giulia. A selection of Ribolla Gialla wines tasted at vinitaly.

Ribolla Gialla: White Wines from Friuli Venezia Giulia
Ribolla Gialla is an ancient varietal from Friuli Venezia Giulia. A selection of Ribolla Gialla wines tasted at vinitaly.

The 2009 Chianti Rufina and the 2008 & 2007 Chianti Rufina Riserva: What Impressed me
This year the Chianti Rufina Consorzio presented the 2009 Chianti Rufina d'Annata, and the 2008 Chianti Rufina Rieserva, as well as several 2007 Chianti Rufina Riserva wines. Here are the wines that impressed me the most.

The 2011 Chianti Classico Presentation: What Impressed Me
The 2011 Chianti Classico Presentation: What Impressed Me. This year the Chianti Classico Anteprima was structured differently, with only one day of formal tastings. Therefore, rather than discuss the Vintage and Riserva wines separately, I am grouping them together. Here are the wines that impressed me the most.

Bardolino Chiaretto: Fine Summer and Cookout Wines From the 2010 Vintage
Bardolino may be known for its red wine, but is is also home to Chiaretto, which is made from the same grapes: It's a light rosÚ that is ideally suited to summer dining, be it indoors or out doors. I spent the first day of the 2010 Bardolino vintage presentation tasting Bardolino Chiaretto, which is a light rosÚ, and here are the wines that impressed me the most.

Bardolino Chiaretto: Fine Summer and Cookout Wines From the 2010 Vintage
Bardolino may be known for its red wine, but is is also home to Chiaretto, which is made from the same grapes: It's a light rosÚ that is ideally suited to summer dining, be it indoors or out doors. I spent the first day of the 2010 Bardolino vintage presentation tasting Bardolino Chiaretto, which is a light rosÚ, and here are the wines that impressed me the most.

2005 Barbaresco and Roero: What Impressed Me The Most
This year the 2005 Roero and Barbaresco vintages were presented at Alba Wines. These are the wines that impressed me the most.

Italian Bubbly for Valentine's Day 2009
This year I returned to Spumantia, Viareggio's presentation of sparkling wines: It's an interesting event, because rather than focus on a particular kind of wine, there was everything from light, spritzy Prosecco through much more serious, well aged Franciacorta and Champagne. I had a great time, and here is a selection of wines: Some will be perfect for Valentine's Day or other romantic occasions, while others will be nice with friends at table or while talking far from food.

Gavi, Piemonte's Great White Wine: What Impressed Me
Gavi is white wine made from the Cortese grape, which is often referred to as Piemonte's white analog to Nebbiolo in wine books (especially the older ones). Gavi tends to be on the crisp side, ranging from decidedly tart to round with citrus overtones; though some Gavi will work as an aperitif many are food wines that will give their best at table.

Gavi, Piemonte's Great White Wine: What Impressed Me
Gavi is white wine made from the Cortese grape, which is often referred to as Piemonte's white analog to Nebbiolo in wine books (especially the older ones). Gavi tends to be on the crisp side, ranging from decidedly tart to round with citrus overtones; though some Gavi will work as an aperitif many are food wines that will give their best at table.

Gavi, Piemonte's Great White Wine: What Impressed Me
Gavi is white wine made from the Cortese grape, which is often referred to as Piemonte's white analog to Nebbiolo in wine books (especially the older ones). Gavi tends to be on the crisp side, ranging from decidedly tart to round with citrus overtones; though some Gavi will work as an aperitif many are food wines that will give their best at table.

2005 Barbaresco and Roero: What Impressed Me The Most
This year the 2005 Roero and Barbaresco vintages were presented at Alba Wines. These are the wines that impressed me the most.

Franciacorta: Fine Bollicine
Though some other Italian sparkling wines are better known -- spritzy dry Prosecco and lasciviously sweet Asti, in particular -- none can match Franciacorta's depth or elegance, and indeed pundits often liken Franciacorta to French Champagne. In short, it's an excellent wine for a special occasion, especially Valentine's Day, or a party if you decide to go all out. Any of these wines, which I tasted at the Franciacorta Festival this fall, will bring great enjoyment.

Franciacorta: Fine Bollicine
Though some other Italian sparkling wines are better known -- spritzy dry Prosecco and lasciviously sweet Asti, in particular -- none can match Franciacorta's depth or elegance, and indeed pundits often liken Franciacorta to French Champagne. In short, it's an excellent wine for a special occasion, especially Valentine's Day, or a party if you decide to go all out. Any of these wines, which I tasted at the Franciacorta Festival this fall, will bring great enjoyment.

Benvenuto Brunello: The 2004 Brunello Riserva
For Brunello di Montalcino, 2004 offered a very nice change of pace after two extremely difficult vintages, and the Brunello 2004 Riserva, presented in 2010, included many fine wines. Here you will find those that impressed me the most. As is always the case with Brunello di Montalcino, they are very young now (2010), and will profit from more bottle age -- on their sides in a cool, dark, still place for as long as you can bear to wait. 15 years, even.

Vernaccia Di San Gimignano, Tasted 2009: What Impressed me the Most
Vernaccia di San Gimignano's origins are shrouded in the mists of time: Some even suggest that the grapes used to make it were brought by the Etruscans. In any case, over the centuries the vines adapted superbly to the soil, and by the Renaissance Vernaccia was considered Italy's finest white wine, fit to fire the imaginations of poets, artists and Popes. Because of its historical renown, it was the first Italian wine to be awarded DOC status, in 1966. Here are the wines tasted in 2009.

Vernaccia Di San Gimignano, Tasted 2009: What Impressed me the Most
Vernaccia di San Gimignano's origins are shrouded in the mists of time: Some even suggest that the grapes used to make it were brought by the Etruscans. In any case, over the centuries the vines adapted superbly to the soil, and by the Renaissance Vernaccia was considered Italy's finest white wine, fit to fire the imaginations of poets, artists and Popes. Because of its historical renown, it was the first Italian wine to be awarded DOC status, in 1966. Here are the wines tasted in 2009.

Vernaccia Di San Gimignano, Tasted 2009: What Impressed me the Most
Vernaccia di San Gimignano's origins are shrouded in the mists of time: Some even suggest that the grapes used to make it were brought by the Etruscans. In any case, over the centuries the vines adapted superbly to the soil, and by the Renaissance Vernaccia was considered Italy's finest white wine, fit to fire the imaginations of poets, artists and Popes. Because of its historical renown, it was the first Italian wine to be awarded DOC status, in 1966. Here are the wines tasted in 2009.

Bolgheri's Wines Presented in 2009: What Impressed Me
Bolgheri is both a town on the Tuscan coast and its wines, which can be very good. Especially those made with Cabernet, which grows very well in the area. Sassicaia may be the best known of the area's Cabernet-based wines, thanks to a famous tasteoff with Bordeaux wines (which it won), but it's by no means the only. And there are also nice lighter reds, rosÚs, and whites from Bolgheri. Here is what impressed me the most at this year's tasting for the Press.

Bolgheri's Wines Presented in 2009: What Impressed Me
Bolgheri is both a town on the Tuscan coast and its wines, which can be very good. Especially those made with Cabernet, which grows very well in the area. Sassicaia may be the best known of the area's Cabernet-based wines, thanks to a famous tasteoff with Bordeaux wines (which it won), but it's by no means the only. And there are also nice lighter reds, rosÚs, and whites from Bolgheri. Here is what impressed me the most at this year's tasting for the Press.

Bolgheri's Wines Presented in 2009: What Impressed Me
Bolgheri is both a town on the Tuscan coast and its wines, which can be very good. Especially those made with Cabernet, which grows very well in the area. Sassicaia may be the best known of the area's Cabernet-based wines, thanks to a famous tasteoff with Bordeaux wines (which it won), but it's by no means the only. And there are also nice lighter reds, rosÚs, and whites from Bolgheri. Here is what impressed me the most at this year's tasting for the Press.

More Ideas For La Vigilia, Or The Feast Of the Seven Fishes
Many parts of Italy celebrate Christmas Eve with a fish-based dinner, a tradition that lives on in immigrant communities as the Feast of the Seven Fishes. Here are some more Italian ideas for the meal.

Favorite Summer Pasta Dishes
Italian foods are seasonal, with rich foods during the winter to keep the chill at bay, and lighter, more refershing dishes in the summer to help us deal with the heat. Here are some summer pasta dishes I especially like.

Italian Bread Soups
Italy has a rich, and varied tradition of bread soups, Here is a selection of Italian bread soup recipes, some for the summer and others for the winter.

Favorite Green Sauces for Pasta
While red sauces are primarily summer sauces -- they are tomato-based, after all -- green sauces happen year round. Though what makes them green does change considerably. Endless, tasty variety!

Favorite Green Sauces for Pasta
While red sauces are primarily summer sauces -- they are tomato-based, after all -- green sauces happen year round. Though what makes them green does change considerably. Endless, tasty variety!

Got Cabbage? Favorite Italian Cabbage Recipes
Cabbage is the one of the most popular winter vegetables in Italy, and rightly so: It comes into season during the winter months, is inexpensive, is nutritious, is quite tasty, and is also versatile, working well in antipasti, soups, risotti, and main courses. Who could ask for more? Here is a quick rundown of favorite Italian cabbage recipes, starting with antipasti.

Got Cabbage? Favorite Italian Cabbage Recipes
Cabbage is the one of the most popular winter vegetables in Italy, and rightly so: It comes into season during the winter months, is inexpensive, is nutritious, is quite tasty, and is also versatile, working well in antipasti, soups, risotti, and main courses. Who could ask for more? Here is a quick rundown of favorite Italian cabbage recipes, starting with antipasti.

What to do with Stale bread?
An Italian meal wouldn't be a meal without a loaf at table, and lots of people even use it to accompany pasta (and then wipe up the drippings with the crust, what's called fare la scarpetta). Because of this love of bread we had 5 bakeries within a 5-minute walk from our house in Florence, and now that we're out in the country we've got 3. Problem is, sometimes we buy too much and some goes stale. Or is this a problem? No, because there are many uses for stale bread.

Favorite Italian Finger And Party Foods
Italy has a long tradition of finger foods, tasty morsels to grab on the go: Arancini, panelle, calzoni, frittelle, or any number of things. These finger foods also make great party foods, while the many spreads and toppings people put on crostini (toasted bread) also make great dips. Much to enjoy!

Summer Tomatoes, Eggplant and Zucchini Blossoms From Giovanna, Giancarlo and Bruno's Vegetable Garden
Summer Tomatoes, Eggplant and Zucchini Blossoms From Giovanna, Giancarlo and Bruno's Vegetable Garden

The Almost Wordless Wednesday Gallery
My wordless Wednesday posts are among the most popular posts I do. And here they are collected, with full size images.

The Almost Wordless Wednesday Gallery
My wordless Wednesday posts are among the most popular posts I do. And here they are collected, with full size images.

The Almost Wordless Wednesday Gallery
My wordless Wednesday posts are among the most popular posts I do. And here they are collected, with full size images.

The Almost Wordless Wednesday Gallery
My wordless Wednesday posts are among the most popular posts I do. And here they are collected, with full size images.

The Almost Wordless Wednesday Gallery
My wordless Wednesday posts are among the most popular posts I do. And here they are collected, with full size images.

The Almost Wordless Wednesday Gallery
My wordless Wednesday posts are among the most popular posts I do. And here they are collected, with full size images.

The Almost Wordless Wednesday Gallery
My wordless Wednesday posts are among the most popular posts I do. And here they are collected, with full size images.

The Almost Wordless Wednesday Gallery
My wordless Wednesday posts are among the most popular posts I do. And here they are collected, with full size images.

The Almost Wordless Wednesday Gallery
My wordless Wednesday posts are among the most popular posts I do. And here they are collected, with full size images.

Alessandro Montini, Fishmonger in Florence's Mercato di San Lorenzo, with a fresh tuna.
Alessandro Montini, Fishmonger in Florence's Mercato di San Lorenzo, with a fresh tuna.

La Galleria del Pesce - Photos from Italian Fish Markets
Photos from Italian fish markets, to help you decide what might work as a substitute if the Mediterranean fish aren't available where you live.

La Galleria del Pesce - Photos from Italian Fish Markets
Photos from Italian fish markets, to help you decide what might work as a substitute if the Mediterranean fish aren't available where you live.

La Galleria del Pesce - Photos from Italian Fish Markets
Photos from Italian fish markets, to help you decide what might work as a substitute if the Mediterranean fish aren't available where you live.

La Galleria del Pesce - Photos from Italian Fish Markets
Photos from Italian fish markets, to help you decide what might work as a substitute if the Mediterranean fish aren't available where you live.

La Galleria del Pesce - Photos from Italian Fish Markets
Photos from Italian fish markets, to help you decide what might work as a substitute if the Mediterranean fish aren't available where you live.

La Galleria del Pesce - Photos from Italian Fish Markets
Photos from Italian fish markets, to help you decide what might work as a substitute if the Mediterranean fish aren't available where you live.

Photos of Italian Foods, Wines, and More
Photographs of Italian foods, wine cellars, and more

Penne Rigate with Peppers and Eggplant Recipe
In winter, penne pasta are perfect with a thick meat sauce. In the summer, on the other hand, this vegetable sauce will be much more refreshing.

Italian Island Cuisines
Italy has two major islands, Sicily and Sardegna. They are very different, both with respect to each other and with respect to the Continent, and both have many delicacies for gourmands to enjoy.

How to Roast a Whole Piglet
The best known Italian roast pig is porchetta: A boned whole pig very well seasoned and spit roasted for hours. It's classic festival food, and a standby at markets and fairs. But unless you're feeding a huge gathering, and have quite a bit of experience managing a fire pit, roasting it's not practical. A piglet is, on the other hand, if you're feeding a large group -- say 20-30 people.

Making a Cheese Basket
A cheese basket is a bowl or dish made out of cheese that you can fill with pasta (with a not-too-liquid sauce), risotto, gnocchi, or even stew. They're easy to make, and make for a beautiful presentation; they're nice for a change of pace, and perfectly suited to a romantic occasion.

La Cucina Abruzzese
The Abruzzo is one of the wilder regions of Italy, with craggy mountains inland and beautiful coastlines. It was isolated in the past, but has become a mecca for hikers, skiers, and vacationers, who come to enjoy both the foods and the land.

La Cucina Calabrese
Calabrian cooking is rich and quite varied, nicely balancing fish, meats and vegetables. Because of the climate Calabresi are adept at preserving foods too.

Tomato - Pomodoro, in Italian
The tomato is now one of the most popular Italian vegetables, especuially in the south. Tomatoes have not always been this popular, however, and still aren't in some parts of Italy. You will find many more tomato based dishes in south Italy than in north Italy.

Cabbage - Cavolo In Italian
Cabbage is Cavolo in Italian. Cabbage is one of the staple winter vegetables in Italy, and Italians enjoy many kinds of cabbage, including red cabbage, green cabbage, savoy cabbage, black leaf kale, and the flowering relatives as well.

Cooking Pasta: How Much Water?
Given the crisis, people are looking for ways to save, and cooking pasta in less water is one possibility. It works, though the texture of the pasta cooked this way is less chewy than that cooked in the standard gallon of boiling water per pound of pasta.

Favorite Fall Recipes
As September flows into October the days shorten, temperatures drop off, and all sorts of new foods come to the market, from apples to chestnuts to black leaf kale. Italian cooking reflects these changes, becoming richer and heartier as fall advances into winter.

Favorite Winter Vegetables
Winter is the time for leafy greens -- arugola, salads, kale, and cabbages and their relatives, among others. Earthier that what one finds in summer, perhaps, but delicious and tremendously satisfying when properly prepared.

Mountains Outside Rufina, on the way to Pontassieve
Mountains Outside Rufina, on the way to Pontassieve

San Giovanni Valdarno: Palazzo Arnolfo, The Town Hall
San Giovanni Valdarno: Palazzo Arnolfo, The Town Hall

Mushroomy Valdostan Bread Pudding Recipe - Tortino Di Pane Valdostano Ai Funghi
The Valle D'Aosta is a small, heavily forested Alpine region tucked in between Piemonte and France, and is blessed with both forests and moisture, the two primary requirements for wild mushrooms. This savory bread pudding is best with fresh porcini, though any flavorful wild mushroom will work.

Trends and Observations: Food
Thoughts on cooking and food: karst region virgin honey culinary philosophy grana padano cheesemonger

Alessio's Baked Pasta with Artichokes Recipe - Fusilli Con Carciofi E Formaggio - Baked Pasta With Artichokes
Baked pasta is a universe, and though Lasagna is what comes to mind first, there are a great many other options. Artichokes, for example, work very well with a creamy cheese sauce, and when baked with pasta yield an extremely tasty dish.

Cooking of the Abruzzo
The Abruzzo is a wild and craggy region with small fishing hamlets along the Adriatic and pastures in the highlands inland, where until quite recently shepherds lived with their flocks for much of the year. The cooking is frugal, simple peasant food, and wholesome too.

Rice Zuccotto - Zuccotto di Riso
Most zuccotti are made with a creamy filling that's put into a bowl lined with pasta Genovese (or pound cake) and chilled well. Here, instead, we have a combination of rice and crema pasticcera, or pastry cream. The effect is different, but equally good, and as is the case with other zuccotti the recipe is easy and results impressive.